News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Rescue Disk/USB stick

    Posted on DriftyDonN Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Rescue Disk/USB stick

    Topic Resolution: Resolved
    Viewing 17 reply threads
    • Author
      Posts
      • #2141638 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        Would rescue media (disk or USB) be advisable in addition to Macrium Image?

        related topic, I am using ver 1903 HOME currently-is it advisable to get an ISO for 1909 now rather than waiting for it to be pushed on me? (using ‘Pause’ function currently. so updates will be forced when pause date arrives….

        Many Thanks!

        D

      • #2141645 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Would rescue media (disk or USB) be advisable in addition to Macrium Image?

        Yes, you absolutely need the Rescue media. If you need to restore, the only way you can access the backup is to boot from the Rescue media and point Macrium at the image and your HDD/SDD.

        is it advisable to get an ISO for 1909 now

        Again, yes. You can use it to install v1909 offline whenever you want to. Also, down the road when you are on v1909, it will give you a way to reinstall it after v2004 comes out and the image is not available on MS.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2141647 Reply
          DriftyDonN
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks! So I’m clear, in addition to the winpe bootable USB(which I made from Macrium I believe), I should have the windows rescue media also(as a backup of sorts?) I ask because I use this when I have to restore an image. Is the windows rescue usb/disk giving me access to different image?Macrium images are on USB external ssd…is windows rescue on c:/drive?

          Color me confused….snafu

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by DriftyDonN. Reason: clarify
          • #2141651 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            The Macrium Rescue disk has a copy of Macrium on it that allows Macrium to run from the Rescue media to do a backup and a restore. The Windows disk does not have the Macrium program on it. It boots into Macrium

            The Windows Rescue lets you get to utilities on Windows: Command Prompt, Restore points, maybe hardware testing partition, etc. It boots into WinRE

            Other than being able to boot the computer, the two Rescue media are different,

            • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by PKCano.
            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2176445 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          is it advisable to get an ISO for 1909 now

          Again, yes. You can use it to install v1909 offline whenever you want to. Also, down the road when you are on v1909, it will give you a way to reinstall it after v2004 comes out and the image is not available on MS.

          What is an ISO?
          Where does one get an ISO for 1909?
          How is it prepared?
          Can it go on an USB? Or must it go on a CD/DVD?

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

          • #2176506 Reply
            DriftyDonN
            AskWoody Plus

            ISO is a disk image file. see https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

            I was asking about this when I was on 1903 and wanted to get 1909 iso (dl to SSD or HDD for storage before msft did it thru windows update. – use utility-several to choose from-to create the bootable cd/dvd to install- or just store it! you can actually install the software without burning it. Mount from explorer, run setup.exe.)

            Pardon the wandering, dentist today w/ nitrous-still foggier than usual)

            D

      • #2141713 Reply
        Bundaburra
        AskWoody Plus

        With Macrium you can create a boot option (seen by Windows as a second operating system), which will boot you into the recovery environment rather than into Windows.  This option is fine if the system is bootable, but for some reason you want to restore an image.  It does not require the use of a recovery disk.  However, a recovery disk is essential to have if the machine is not bootable or if the recovery environment cannot be accessed.  For peace of mind, have both options available – Other Tasks > Create Rescue Media > Windows Boot Menu AND an external device.

        Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 1909

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2141769 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        Appreciate the clarification PKCano-,Bundaburra

        Now, to find how to create that usb….Control panel=>system repair disk    ??

        Very Appreciative !

        • #2152960 Reply
          DriftyDonN
          AskWoody Plus

          Control Panel=>system repair disk=>yields the following:

          Clipboard01

          No USB available?? USB 3.0 32gb empty stick inserted and ready

          Clipboard02

          winver-1

          Any ideas welcomed. Why is it so b***** hard to find such a basic function??? I do not want to use a disk, dang it!

          D

          Attachments:
      • #2141838 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I only have a boot disk for my backup program. If my system is in need of that much repair that you need a Windows rescue disk, then it’s restore time.

        cheers, Paul

        • #2145340 Reply
          DriftyDonN
          AskWoody Plus

          hi Paul,

          Thats what I thought also but see # #2141651 and #2141713  above. Very helpful. Can’t ever have enough bullets when dealing w/ windows10!!

          DDonN

      • #2153014 Reply
        Lars220
        AskWoody Lounger

        Now, to find how to create that usb….Control panel=>system repair disk ??

        In Windows 10  =  try searching for  ‘ Create a recovery drive ‘  =  see  How-To Geek article for more information about creating the bootable USB stick,  need 8 GB or bigger: –

        https://www.howtogeek.com/131907/how-to-create-and-use-a-recovery-drive-or-system-repair-disc-in-windows-8/

        Article is dated  21 October 2019,  and covers  Windows 10 also.

        Edit by Lars220: Not absolutely certain that  USB  stick is bootable, read article about use.

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Lars220. Reason: usb may not be bootable
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2153025 Reply
          Lars220
          AskWoody Lounger

          My Bad:

          Not absolutely certain that USB stick is bootable, read article about use.

          I read the referenced article  Too Fast  and missed following statement: “The recovery drive is new to Windows 8 and 10. It’s a bootable USB drive that gives you access to the same troubleshooting tools as a system repair disc, but also allows you to reinstall Windows if it comes to that. To achieve this, the recovery drive actually copies the system files necessary for reinstallation from your current PC.”

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2153283 Reply
            DriftyDonN
            AskWoody Plus

            Hi Lars!

            I did finally find the recovery drive choice for USB and it DID take a LONG time!!! After reading that article, I am going to burn a system repair disk tomorrow. I just have a feeling of impending doom regarding microsofts ability to keep this wagon named win10 on the road beacause of the snafu’s every month since release. With macrium images and duplicate ssd’s with these images, MAYBE I’ll not lose my mind!!

            Again, Thanks to all who patiently help us with our varied issues!

            DriftyDonN

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2176441 Reply
              KYKaren
              AskWoody Plus

              I am going to burn a system repair disk tomorrow.

              Can the system repair disk be on an USB? Or does must it on a CD/DVD?

              Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

        • #2176579 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          … about creating the bootable USB stick …

          when I created a bootable USB with Aoemi, it asked me if I wanted to include the WiFi driver and I said “yes”. I also had the option of adding other drivers, but I had no idea of what should/could be added … are there suggestions?

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

      • #2153547 Reply
        Vincenzo
        AskWoody Lounger

        Easy way to find the utility create it:

        Type “Create Recovery Drive” after clicking the Start button

        You also have the option during of telling it to include the necessary files so it can do a clean install of whatever version of Windows is presently installed. It will tell you the size drive it needs.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2172337 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        Sorry that I didn’t mark this resolved a long time ago…

        Thanks some more to all who helped!

        D

      • #2176479 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        System repair disk offers ONLY for disk. I burned that on CD. Then Lars helped w/ the following which helped find the how to create USB .

        https://www.howtogeek.com/131907/how-to-create-and-use-a-recovery-drive-or-system-repair-disc-in-windows-8/

        Article is dated  21 October 2019,  and covers  Windows 10 also.

        Nice day!!

        DiftyDonN

        edit: Guess I’ll have to make new ones for ver 1909 🙁

         

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 3 days ago by DriftyDonN.
        • #2176581 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          yes, the howtogeek URL is very helpful, not only in details and comparisons among and between the various fallbacks, but also helpful not only in overview but also connecting the various pieces of a in-case-bad-things-happen strategy.

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

      • #2176531 Reply
        Carl
        AskWoody Plus

        Because Windows 10 makes me paranoid I have the following:

        1) Macrium recovery USB stick
        2) Macrium recovery boot menu option
        3) Macrium backups and images to separate external drives
        4) Windows 10 recovery disk (USB stick)
        5) Windows 10 on USB stick
        6) Files synced to a fallback computer

        Better safe than sorry.

        Note:
        1) If your computer can boot from USB (often F12), you can use USB sticks for recovery media.
        2) If you have an older computer, keep in mind that the chipset might not have native USB 3.0 support.

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by Carl.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2176575 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          Because Windows 10 makes me paranoid I have the following: …

          2) what is the purpose of this menu? Is it not in any of the others on your list? I am using Aomei BackUpper and this doesn’t seem to be an option there, so I’d like to know more about this one.
          3) what kind of backups .. file backups? system backups?
          4) same thing as a Win10 Recovery Drive?
          5) can you explain further … how do you get Windows 10 on media such as a USB stick?

          no Win10 system repair disk??

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

          • #2176594 Reply
            DriftyDonN
            AskWoody Plus

            KyKaren, what list are you referring to? What is missing? Carls ‘list ‘ is his personal backup/emergency toolbox. He happens to prefer Macrium(as do I) and also the win10 emergency tools (in all win10 iterations) and the How to geek article shows you how to make a USB DRIVE step by step. The drive will contain your windows10 system files so you can reinstall clean version in case of catastrope. This is where your personal file back up would be a happy thing to have unless you dont have any photos , letters etc that you want to keep-hence backup -these can be on any media you choose.

            These tools generally come into play when ,as I said, catastrophe has befallen your PC. In this case , you will use either the Aomei Backupper materials you have prepared – you would insert either bootable disk or bootable USB DRIVE and , at start up press f2  or f12 or esc -depends on your particular PC- this will bring up a boot menu-depending again on your computer- perhaps “boot from”  CD or USB- this also must be set up/enabled in your BIOS or UEFI -it likely is preset from day one at factory but you would have to get into the setup program(BIOS/UEFI) F2 or F12 usually. again based upon your PC. I hope this isn’t sounding condescending. I am confused about what YOU are confused about! 🙂

            In any case, you need or at least should have, 1 a bootable DISK and BOOTABLE USB (redundant but different media) in order to start your PC.  made as per your software of choice. This will then require your external ssd/hdd with image(s) again prepared by same software which you will be able to access and restore to get back to a good place.

            2. A bootable DISK burned using win 10 emergency program. You do not get to choose at this point. It’s a disk. Used the same as the afore mentioned bootable above. This will get you into WINRE environment which you will need to repair your damaged syatem. In tandem with this, you will have a Bootable(!) USB DRIVE prepared from within win10 (see How to geek URL) I have never had to use this option as Macrium has always come thru for me and your software likely will also But, it seems the bootable USB Drive just referred to will have your system (win10) and other tools if needed-I do not know how this works- it appears you may be able to use the BOOTABLE USB for booting and repair. In the end you will have two sets of emergency repair/restore tools to cover most any issues. One set made with Aomi and one set with win10. I hope I understood your question and was of some help.

            Regards,

            DriftyDonN

            (I would be more than happy to have anyone make corrections and point out any errors I may have made.)

            This ‘explanation’ might just exemplify the ‘Drifty” part of my pseudonym!

            • #2176595 Reply
              KYKaren
              AskWoody Plus

              KyKaren, what list are you referring to?

              I was asking Carl about his list. I am familiar with almost everything on his list, except for #2 and #5. I was asking for clarification on #3, because I wasn’t sure if he meant file backups or system backups (see the italics). I think the Win10 Discovery Disk in #4 is the same thing as Win10 Discovery Drive (see the italics), but I asked to be sure. And I thought Carl could tell me more about #5 — is he referring to an iso file? or something else?

              A system repair disk is not on his list. I wondered if he has that on his list, perhaps under another name?

              Yes, I’ve read the HowtoGeek URL, looked at the screenshots, and have also read all of the links in that piece, so most of the things on his list are familiar. I’m just trying to match up terms, mostly, to see if there’s something more that’s not in that URL and associated links–i.e, to find out if there is more there that I have not encountered thus far.

              Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

              • #2176786 Reply
                DriftyDonN
                AskWoody Plus

                Oh now I see….slow on the uptake. Sorry about the rambling explanation that didn’t really apply. I think the initial question about “menu” and “list” were the source of my confusion. Probably I am trying too hard to be helpful …. Hope these other explanations have cleared up your questions!

                DriftyDonN

                Here is a URL that explains what I wanted to in a concise manner that I find clear except Macrium uses Backup and Image almost interchangeably. Also it is a couple years old and does not include the addition of Macrium addition to boot menu, but it is essentially accurate with newest versions. Maybe helpful, but not the same backup software you are using @KyKaren.

                https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/7363/macrium-reflect-is-a-free-and-easy-to-use-backup-utility/

                • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by DriftyDonN. Reason: additional info
          • #2176827 Reply
            Carl
            AskWoody Plus

            In Windows 10, Microsoft calls a system repair disk a “Recovery Drive”. Confusing? Yes. The “drive” part is a holdover from the days before USB sticks could be used for recovery media.

            If you type “recovery” into the Windows search box, at the top of list will be “Recovery Drive”. Select that and follow the GUI to create a USB “Drive” (USB stick) or DVD. When you see the word “recovery”, it implies that the media does not contain a full operating system.

            In the case of backup software, you need two parts (preferably on separate media) to perform a restoration.

            1) Backed-up files or an image (bit by bit duplication of partition or drive)
            2) Bootable media containing the backup software to access above (recovery disk)

            The article that DriftyDonN mentions is worth reading – very easy to understand.

            Macrium has an additional option. It can create a boot menu which is presented when you turn on the computer. Before the operating system loads, a “Choose an Operating System” menu displays with 2 options:

            1) Windows 10
            2) Macrium Reflect System Recovery

            If you select “Windows 10”, the system will boot to the Windows log in screen. If you select the recovery option, you’ll be able to restore from the backup disk(s) you have created.

            This does not take the place of a separate Macrium recovery drive. It won’t be of any use should you have an SSD or hard disk failure, for example.

            In the old days, when you bought a computer retail, you also received a full copy of the operating system (modified to include machine specific drivers) on a DVD. This no longer seems to be the case.

            You can go to the Microsoft website and create a copy of Windows 10 on a USB stick.
            Download Windows 10

            Having this available is just another tool that belongs in your toolbox. For example, if you have a catastrophic drive failure, or you get infected with malware, you may prefer to reinstall from scratch.

            • #2176891 Reply
              KYKaren
              AskWoody Plus

              i.e, to find out if there is more there that I have not encountered thus far.

              in #2716595, the 2nd ‘there’ refers to Carl’s post.

              In Windows 10, Microsoft calls a system repair disk a “Recovery Drive”. Confusing? Yes.

              about this statement in #2176827: “system repair disk” vs recovery drive” A link in the howtogeek url leading to this, recovery drive or system repair disc, indicates that the two are not the same. Under the section “Which Recovery/Repair Tool Should You Create?,” two-reasons-why-you-might-want-both are given.

              Thanks for explaining for me some of the entries in your list.

              Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

              • #2176909 Reply
                Carl
                AskWoody Plus

                Karen, Microsoft really has a way of confusing things. Most of the Windows 7 tools are still available in Windows 10. I use the Windows 7 photo viewer and media player (with h.265 codec support added) for example.

                Likewise Windows 7 backup, restore, and recovery is also present. This was supposedly left there by Microsoft so that people who had files backed up using Windows 7 backup could restore files after upgrading to 10. Using the Windows 7 tools you can create an image or file backup in which case you’d need the Windows 7 “repair disk” for catastrophic restoration.

                Personally, I liked Windows 7 Backup/Restore (because I’m cheap). But, I’m in the minority. You’ll note in Control Panel there’s “Backup and Restore (Window 7)”. This let’s you know that it’s the Win 7 tool.

                My main concern with this is that there is the possibility that Microsoft may remove it or that it isn’t being maintained. I don’t know why MS seems to be taking the position that general users have no need for imaging.

                Anyway, if you can afford it, I’d look for a viable 3rd party backup/recovery solution (cloud, Acronis, Macrium, etc).

                1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2176538 Reply
        Carl
        AskWoody Plus

        After creating recovery media, be sure to test it. Make sure you can boot the media and get into recovery options.

        If I use DVDs for recovery media, I also make more than one. DVDs can be easily scratched and may degrade over time.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2176631 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I also had the option of adding other drivers, but I had no idea of what should/could be added … are there suggestions?

        The drivers are from the PC Aomei is running on. If you store the backup on a USB (hard disk) you don’t need any other drivers.

        2) what is the purpose of this menu?

        MR adds a boot menu to the hard disk. AB doesn’t.

        3) what kind of backups .. file backups? system backups?

        File / data backup so you can restore individual files – make these regularly. Images to recover from Windows / hardware failure – maybe once a month depending on how you feel, 3 months maximum IMO.

        4) same thing as a Win10 Recovery Drive?

        Yup.

        5) how do you get Windows 10 on media such as a USB stick?

        Make an ISO and then use Rufus to put it on USB, or burn a DVD and then make an ISO from that.

        cheers, Paul

        • #2176731 Reply
          bbearren
          AskWoody MVP

          Make an ISO and then use Rufus to put it on USB

          You don’t need Rufus.  Windows 10 can natively mount an ISO file.  Plug in a fat32 formatted USB thumb drive, mount the ISO, then copy the contents of the mounted ISO to the USB thumb drive.

          That’s all it takes.  The USB is bootable simply because the Windows ISO is bootable, and it’s a direct copy.  After the copy, unmount the ISO.

          Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
          "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
          "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

          • #2176768 Reply
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            Thanks for pointing that out. It’s applicable to any UEFI boot programs, W10, Linux etc, but not MBR boot.

            cheers, Paul

          • #2176899 Reply
            KYKaren
            AskWoody Plus

            Windows 10 can natively mount an ISO file. Plug in a fat32 formatted USB thumb drive, mount the ISO, then copy the contents of the mounted ISO to the USB thumb drive. …….After the copy, unmount the ISO.

            1. How do I find out the format of the USB that I have in hand? If it’s not a fat32-formatted USB, is there a way to format it that way?
            2. How large should this USB be?
            3. What does “mount the ISO” mean, operationally? I think it means “download it to a folder,” but I could be wrong.
            4. If the ISO is “mounted”, then I should be able to find it in File Explorer, right?
            5. Can I do the ‘copy’ via Win10 File Explorer? Sometimes when I copy files from one PC to another PC via FE, FE balks–the most familiar complaint being that the filename is too long.
            6. And what does “unmount the ISO” mean, operationally?
            7. I have gone to the MS website for downloading Windows 10. Do I click on the ‘Update Now’ button, under the line that says “The Update Assistant can help you update to the latest version of Windows 10. To get started, click Update now”? Or do I click on “Download tool now” under the heading “Create Windows 10 Installation Media”?

            As you can tell, I am still ‘wet behind the ears’.
            Thanks, @bbearren

            Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

            • #2176933 Reply
              bbearren
              AskWoody MVP

              How do I find out the format of the USB that I have in hand? If it’s not a fat32-formatted USB, is there a way to format it that way?

              Plug the USB stick into a USB port on your PC/laptop, open File Explorer, look for your USB stick in the left pane (it will have a new drive letter assigned by File Explorer).  Right click on the USB stick in the left pane and select Properties.  On the General tab, you’ll see the name of the USB stick, the Type: USB Drive, and the File System: FAT32 (probably).

              If it is not FAT32 (they usually are), close the Properties dialog box, right-click the USB stick in the left pane again, and this time select Format.  Windows default format for USB sticks is FAT32, so all you really need to do is click Start down at the bottom.  But, it should already be formatted FAT32.

              How large should this USB be?

              For a Windows 10 ISO, you’ll need 8GB.

              What does “mount the ISO” mean, operationally? I think it means “download it to a folder,” but I could be wrong.

              In File Explorer, navigate to where you have downloaded your Windows 10 ISO, then double-click it.

              If the ISO is “mounted”, then I should be able to find it in File Explorer, right?

              Windows 10 will mount the ISO to a virtual DVD disc and give it a drive letter in the left pane.  Click that drive in the left pane and you’ll then see all the contents in the right pane.

              Can I do the ‘copy’ via Win10 File Explorer? Sometimes when I copy files from one PC to another PC via FE, FE balks–the most familiar complaint being that the filename is too long.

              Yes, use File Explorer.  With the contents of the virtual DVD in the right pane, left-click on the top object in the right pane, then press and hold the shift key and left-click the bottom item in the right pane.  The entire contents should now be highlighted, and you can release the left mouse button.

              With your mouse pointer over that highlighted area, left click and hold, then drag the contents to the USB stick in the left pane.  You’ll get a dialog box saying that the copy is in progress.

              And what does “unmount the ISO” mean, operationally?

              After all the files and folders have been copied to the USB stick, in the left pane right-click on the virtual DVD drive and in the context menu, select Eject.  The virtual drive will disappear.

              I have gone to the MS website for downloading Windows 10. Do I click on the ‘Update Now’ button, under the line that says “The Update Assistant can help you update to the latest version of Windows 10. To get started, click Update now”? Or do I click on “Download tool now” under the heading “Create Windows 10 Installation Media”?

              Click “Download tool now”.  If you’re given the option to run the tool, select Run, and in the dialog that follows, select Create ISO.  If you download the tool and then run it, you’ll be given the same options.  One of which is to create a USB stick for installation.  For that you’ll need an 8GB stick, minimum, and you’ll need to have it plugged into a USB port.

              If I’ve answered your questions, I would suggest that you let Microsoft/Windows/Media Creation Tool take care of you USB stick.

              Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
              "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
              "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

              • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by bbearren.
        • #2176915 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          If you store the backup on a USB (hard disk) you don’t need any other drivers.

          Are you saying here that a USB is a hard disk? I thought a USB is an external flash drive in the form of a stick that goes in the USB port (like a car key that goes in the ignition aperature), that a hard drive is a set of internal or external mechanically-spinning layers of disks (not just one disk), that a CD is literally a disk, and that a SSD is an internal or external drive, too, kinda like a flash drive, but not in the form of a stick and more structurally complicated because it’s much larger.

          I ask because the kind of media seems to an important factor on where these in-case-bad-things-happen fallbacks are stored.

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

          • #2176989 Reply
            DriftyDonN
            AskWoody Plus

            Hi Karen,

            USB is a type of connection on your computer. It looks like a narrow rectangle on either side, front or rear of your PC. The speed at which data moves back and forth on these ports dependent on version as technology moves ahead the most common today is USB 3.0 (not the fastest)As you stated disks are cd/dvd- but can also be referring to hard disks(drive) SSD(sometimes solid state disk drive)

            The ignition key analogy is correct in that the thumb drive or flash drive (sometimes stick) are one in the same that utilize the USB port(rectangle) to connect to your Pc There are many different peripherals that utilize the USB connection(Universal Serial Bus) ie flash drives, Printers, external Hard Disk Drives, External SSD’s. and many others. Hard disk drives are parallel platters that spin with a read/write tool- its mechanical hence will likely break down eventually, Although I have never had one go down. SSD is Solid State Drive= no moving parts. Can be usb external or internal  VERY fast esp compared to HDD (mechanical)

            As you can see, the terms disk and drive depend on the context.

            USB always refers to the connector type.

             

            • #2177001 Reply
              KYKaren
              AskWoody Plus

              OK, I get it now …
              1. USB-connected thumb=flash=stick drive
              2. USB-connected hard drive=external drive
              3. USB-connected printer
              4. USB-connected Solid State Drive

              Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

              1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2177002 Reply
                DriftyDonN
                AskWoody Plus

                basically, yes. Anything connected via USB is technically external.

                I have found a lot of good tips in tenforum so I thought if you hadn’t been there perhaps you would find it of some use. Bleepingcomputer.com is another very helpful site….

                More sources, more help!!

                …and I need all I can get!

                DriftyDonN

      • #2176927 Reply
        Carl
        AskWoody Plus

        A USB hard disk generally refers to an external drive (spinning rust sata drive in some form of enclosure) that plugs into a USB port. Most do not require any special drivers to be recognized by the operating system.

        Personally, I use USB mechanical drives for backup/imaging (cheap) and never leave them connected to the computer. For my newer Win 10 computers, I keep recovery media on USB sticks for convenience. I also keep a copy of all current drivers (installers unpacked) on a separate USB stick for each computer.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2176963 Reply
        KYKaren
        AskWoody Plus

        I need some clarification:

        I would suggest that you let Microsoft/Windows/Media Creation Tool take care of you USB stick.

        So, the above means skip the instructions to “mount the ISO, then copy the contents of the mounted ISO to the USB thumb drive. …….After the copy, unmount the ISO.” ??

        If so, :

        Click “Download tool now”. If you’re given the option to run the tool, select Run, and in the dialog that follows, select Create ISO. If you download the tool and then run it, you’ll be given the same options. One of which is to create a USB stick for installation. For that you’ll need an 8GB stick, minimum, and you’ll need to have it plugged into a USB port.

        Then these are the instructions that I see at Download Windows 10.
        I think that although it says “on a different PC,” that can mean “on the same PC” (i.e., I am creating the USB media to re-install Windows 10 on the same PC, at some later time. I am talking about the line where the red arrow is.
        download_tool_now

        Opening the circle with the + in it (where the red arrow is), below is what I see. The first red arrow points to the place you mention for “download the tool now” and “select run”. That’s clear. Then, the place where the second red arrow has two bullets, one for USB flash drive and the other for an ISO file. Is this an either-or choice? (in other words, what is on the USB flash drive is the ISO file? Or alternatively, what’s on the USB flash drive will do the same thing as an ISO file would do, if it were mounted, the contents of the mounted ISO were copied to the USB, and the ISO were unmounted. In other words, whichever way it’s done (via a USB flash drive or via an ISO mounted-contents copied-ISO unmounted routine), a copy of Windows 10 is going to go on the USB flash drive.
        using-the-tool-to-create-install-media

        I ask because I want to be sure that 1) I get a copy of Windows 10 that can be re-installed, if I need to turn to this fallback as a last resort if/when updating Windows CU goes south. AND 2) in the process of thinking that I am following these instructions correctly to make a copy of Windows 10, I don’t instead replace the Windows that is currently working fine on my PC!!

        Lastly, A) if I am doing this on a Win10/Pro PC, will the copy on the USB flash drive be Win10/Pro?
        B) Do I need to do this each time I move up to a newer version of Win10. I am on 1909 now.

        Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

        Attachments:
        • #2176971 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          @bbearren — I wanted to add at the end — Thanks for sticking with me on this — but I lost my last chance to edit!!

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

        • #2176975 Reply
          Carl
          AskWoody Plus

          You’re doing everything right. You will be given the choice of:

          1) Creating a bootable USB stick with the full Win 10 OS on it, or
          2) Creating an ISO file that can be saved to disk and later burned to DVD

          I used this tool to create a Win 10 bootable USB stick while using a Windows 7 Ultimate computer. I then used the USB stick to install Win 10 on a computer that didn’t have any operating system installed. I also used it to clean install on another computer that had been upgraded.

          • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by Carl. Reason: typo
          • #2176981 Reply
            KYKaren
            AskWoody Plus

            2) Creating an ISO file that can be saved to disk and later burned to DVD

            But, if I understand the ‘mount an ISO – copy the contents of the mounted ISO to an USB – unmount the ISO’ routine, you can get the Windows 10 copy on an USB instead of a DVD, right?

            Let me ask you this:
            Microsoft has all kinds of safeguards so that people do not pirate Windows, doesn’t it? How can one be assured that one ends up with a licensed copy of Windows 10 when it is re-installed as the last resort after a CU bollixed the O/S that had been working just fine?

            Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

            • #2176988 Reply
              bbearren
              AskWoody MVP

              Microsoft has all kinds of safeguards so that people do not pirate Windows, doesn’t it? How can one be assured that one ends up with a licensed copy of Windows 10 when it is re-installed as the last resort after a CU bollixed the O/S that had been working just fine?

              Your PC contains the license for Windows 10, and Microsoft has a copy of your particular license for Windows 10.  It’s tied to your hardware, not to a Microsoft account or anything like that.

              What that means is that you can install Windows 10 illegally, but it won’t activate.  There’s a short grace period to get it activated, but after that grace period expires, Windows 10 gets severely crippled.

              One more note on doing an in-place upgrade (repair/reinstall), you’ll need to log on as a member of the Administrators group.

              Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
              "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
              "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        • #2176991 Reply
          Carl
          AskWoody Plus

          Also, because you are creating “installation media for another pc”, you needn’t fear that you will damage your currently working system.

          The only residual effect of using the media creation tool is that it creates 1 or 2 harmless, hidden directories on your current installation. Here you’ll find log files and such.

          There are other methods of creating Win 10 installation media, but I think the Microsoft way (media creation tool) is the easiest for most people.

          If your computer is upgraded to a new release (1909 to 2004 for example), then yes, you will want to create a new install stick once MS makes the new version available using the media creation tool.

      • #2176987 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        @KYKaren, what @carl said is correct.  If you run the tool for “this PC” you get the option of upgrading from online, or creating installation media for another PC.  You aren’t given an option to create a USB stick just for your PC.

        When you create a USB stick with the Media Creation Tool, it will have 6 or 7 versions of Windows 10.  But when you use it on your PC, it will pull the version that matches your PC.  If you were to use it on a Windows Home PC, it would pull the version for Windows Home.

        When you boot from the USB stick, you will be given options to upgrade or repair.  Using the repair options will lead you to a menu that includes restore an image made by Windows.  You can also use it for an in-place upgrade (repair/reinstall) by booting into Windows, then inserting the USB stick into a port, and running Setup from there.  That will leave your data and settings intact.

        And yes, you’ll have to create new media for a new version of Windows 10.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        • #2177011 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          You aren’t given an option to create a USB stick just for your PC….

          Your PC contains the license for Windows 10, and Microsoft has a copy of your particular license for Windows 10.

          So, does this mean that after having created a Windows 10 copy on a USB-connected flash drive and having used that to re-install Windows (according to the matching PC’s Windows, i.e. Win10/Pro), I will then have to re-activate the license I had?

          I have no record of the product key/license number or whatever it’s called nowadays. When it came to me from the manufacturer, everything was already up and working, including MS-Office. (or a DELL agent did whatever was necessary to get it up and working — I don’t remember now). So, if I had to provide a product key/license number in order to re-activate Windows 10/Pro how could I know what that is?

          Or is there same kind of stamping on the hardware (working something like a VIN) that lets Microsoft know that the appropriate Windows that it is pulling from the USB stick is being re-installed on a legitimate, Windows-licensed machine?

          I hadn’t thought of getting MS-Office re-installed until just now. Is that another ball of wax entirely?

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

          • #2177016 Reply
            DriftyDonN
            AskWoody Plus
            • #2177020 Reply
              Elly
              AskWoody MVP

              This article stresses that you sign in to your Microsoft Account in order to activate your license. You don’t have to have to have a Microsoft Account, or sign into it, in order to activate your license. (I really hate Microsoft and everyone else pushing you to have a Microsoft Account, when it is, and should be, optional). What should happen, even if you do a ‘clean install’ after wiping everything off the hard drive, is that when it phones home, Microsoft will recognize the hardware and activate your existing license. It might be one thing I’d be happy about Microsoft collecting and keeping…

              Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

              3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2176990 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2177031 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Installing Office – if you upgrade a computer that has Office, it will still have Office.  If you do a clean install, you will need to install it again.

        Office 2013 or newer or 365 required an account when originally activated.  Logging into that account will give you what you need to reinstall.

        Office 2010 – while the old computer/installation is still working, you need to find the key with a keyfinder software.  Once you have that, this site will let you download and you can use your key to reinstall https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/office

        Older office – you need your key, and you need install media.  If this is a problem, software like PCmover might get you going.

        If you restore a full system image of the same computer after a crash, if that image had Office it will be there again.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2177052 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I ask because I want to be sure that 1) I get a copy of Windows 10 that can be re-installed

        You are stressing unnecessarily.

        Use a free 3rd party backup app and make an image to external (USB) hard disk.
        Make a bootable rescue USB stick from the backup app.
        Test the bootable stick.
        Put the stick and disk in a safe and secure place.
        Relax in the knowledge of a job well done.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2177350 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          You are stressing unnecessarily.

          My asking questions is an indication of curiosity and a desire to learn. I’d like to know how things work, that’s all.

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

          • #2177357 Reply
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            My asking questions is an indication of curiosity and a desire to learn. I’d like to know how things work, that’s all.

            Keep asking, and I’ll keep answering to the best of my ability.  For me, that’s what it’s all about.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 17 reply threads

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Rescue Disk/USB stick

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.