News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Resetting a driver

    Posted on berniec Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Resetting a driver

    This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Paul T 3 weeks, 5 days ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #2040014 Reply

      berniec
      AskWoody Plus

      I while back y’all helped me understand that the reason why my WiFi didn’t come back when I woke up my laptop from hibernating is that there’s some magic ‘reset’ that doesn’t get sent when un-hibernating or something like that. What always works, though, is to do the “network troubleshooter”… it messes around and then says it reset the driver and it is now working [and it is!!]. So now I’ve been shutting the laptop down, and, indeed, the WiFi driver comes up without a problem BUT.. the d*** [slow] laptop takes *minutes* to boot [in fact, that’s why I started putting it to bed by hibernating instead of shutting down]

      Is there a way to do directly what the troubleshooter does? I’m a fan of doing as little clickingt-around as necessary and so I’ve tried figuring out what the troubleshooted *does* when it resets the driver. I tried poking around and the only resetting i could do turned out to require a restart [which, of course, defeated the purpose of having hibernated in the first place]. Is there a direct way to do the reset?

    • #2040017 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      Try:
      Control Panel\Networking & Sharing Center
      Upper left “Change adapter settings”
      Right click on WiFi adapter, choose “Disable”
      Breathe in, breathe out 🙂
      Right click on it again, choose “Enable”

    • #2040252 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      A simple bit of PowerShell will do the trick.

      Restart-NetAdapter -Name "Ethernet 2"

      To find out the name of the adapter run get-networkadapter

      If the adapter name if too long to type you can use wildcards.

      Restart-NetAdapter -Name "E*"

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2040577 Reply

        anonymous

        Great, right-to-the-point-to-get-things-done type of response, @paul-t .

        BUT, one question…how in the world would @berniec launch PowerShell in the first place?? Many folks in these parts don’t know a thing about PowerShell, and are probably unfamiliar with just how how to launch it.

        • #2040614 Reply

          Kirsty
          Da Boss

          BUT, one question…how in the world would @berniec launch PowerShell in the first place??

          In Windows 10, a change was made about 2 years ago, where the command prompt gives you powershell by default, instead of cmd.exe (it is possible to change that setting, of course).

          PowerShell is replacing Command Prompt
          Last Updated: Nov 21, 2017

          To create the best command-line experience, PowerShell is now the command shell for File Explorer. It replaces Command Prompt (cmd.exe) in the Windows Logo Key + X menu, in File Explorer’s File menu, and in the context menu that appears when you shift-right-click the whitespace in File Explorer. You can still enter cmd (or powershell) in File Explorer’s address bar to launch the command shell.

    • #2087593 Reply

      berniec
      AskWoody Plus

      A simple bit of PowerShell will do the trick.

      Restart-NetAdapter -Name "Ethernet 2"

      To find out the name of the adapter run get-networkadapter

      If the adapter name if too long to type you can use wildcards.

      Restart-NetAdapter -Name "E*"

      cheers, Paul

      One thing — it is possible to execute powershell commands from a batch file or something like that?   I have a built-in dislike of complicated commands and remembering things like driver names.

      If it weren’t power-shell, I’d just do a one-line standard batch file [that’s how I hibernate the system!  The hibernate key on the desktop doesn’t do anything  Instead of trying to figure out why, I just made a batch file with “shutdown /h”]

    • #2088375 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      You can chuck it all in a batch file if you want, or create a shortcut on the desktop.

      powershell -command get-netadapter
      powershell -command Restart-NetAdapter -Name "E*"

      cheers, Paul

      p.s. get-netadapter is the correct command

      1 user thanked author for this post.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Resetting a driver

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.