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  • Restoring Win 10 Plus drivers

    Posted on CWBillow Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Restoring Win 10 Plus drivers

    This topic contains 20 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  MrJimPhelps 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

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    • #1745596 Reply

      CWBillow
      AskWoody Plus

      Ah, the world spins and changes.  I bought a new laptop, and it came pre-installed with W-10 Home, and all the drivers for the hardware.  I want and am going to upgrade to W-10 Pro.  I asked support if I needed to revert to a “clean” install like I had at delivery, would the Windows 10 Pro remain.  They said yes.  I know they are wrong.

      So then, my option for backing up in case of disaster is to revert to  the initial install config. Upgrade THAT to W-10 Pro, and then use THAT in case of disaster, and NOT the store recovery, thereby saving the drivers, but NOT losing the registration of the W-10 Pro.

      Does that sound right?

      Chuck Billow

    • #1746551 Reply

      Rick Corbett
      AskWoody_MVP

      From another post it appears your new laptop is an HP… and I’m going to guess that all its hardware drivers are installed automatically. I would check however.

      1. Take an image backup of the current Win 10 Home install… just in case.
      2. Carry out a reset to check all hardware drivers are re-installed, with no issues showing in Device Manager.

        (Personally I would carry out a clean install using media downloaded/created using MS’ Media Creation Tool (MCT)… but that’s just me. I use an 8GB USB stick so I can download multiple versions e.g. architecture/bitness. Just bear in mind that the current MCT tool now creates media for the Win 10 1903 version.)

        Note that a reset from within Settings will not only reset Windows but also re-install all the OEM crapware included in the laptop’s Out Of The Box Experience (OOBE), customised by HP. (There isn’t a way of avoiding this unless you stop OOBE, enter Audit Mode and use something like the portable Geek Uninstaller or portable Ccleaner to uninstall the crapware.)

      3. Take another image backup… just in case.
      4. Carry out your upgrade to Pro, check Device Manager for issues and – if all looks good – take another image backup AFTER you check activation of Pro has been carried out. Note that at this point Win 10’s Digital License is now for Pro, even though the hard-wired code in the laptop’s UEFI will show it’s ‘licensed’ for Home. (I had a link to an Ed Bott/ZDNet article explaining how upgrades work in terms of digital licenses but I can’t find it at the moment.)

      That’s the basics, AFAIK. Just remember that a reset from within Windows triggers the OOBE process so the OS has to re-activate itself. It does this by going online and searchng for the stored Digital License based on its unique hardware ID. Your laptop’s UEFI will initially flag that it’s licensed for a Home edition. However, the activation servers will look at the laptop’s hardware ID and note that the original edition was upgraded to Pro. An image backup includes the current activation status… although this will be checked regularly whilst online.

      Hope this helps… (It goes without saying that image backups need to be tested that they restore OK. A corrupt backup is no backup at all.)

      • #1746616 Reply

        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        I found the Ed Bott/ZDNet article I referred to in my previous post. As he says in his How to upgrade from Windows 10 Home to Pro for free article:

        After you upgrade from Windows 10 Home, the Windows 10 Pro digital license is attached to the specific hardware you just upgraded, allowing you to reinstall that edition of Windows on that hardware anytime, without the need for a product key.

        Hope this helps…

    • #1746601 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Does that sound right?

      You have 2 options : Clean install or upgrade over the current installation.
      If you have Pro license just create an image backup on your current system and upgrade by replacing your home license with the the Pro license.

      https://www.lifewire.com/upgrade-windows-10-home-to-pro-4178259

      • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  Alex5723.
      • #1746764 Reply

        CWBillow
        AskWoody Plus

        It was exactly by using that method that I discovered that the license for the 10-Pro I had just bought was invalid.  It wouldn’t register, and by calling MS it was determined to be invalid.  I’m waiting on the replacement copy and then upgrading.

        To all:  One of the things about getting a pre-set PC  is the concern for all the drivers etc.  In my case they are all part of the built-in restore, and then what I needed to verify was that in upgrading to Pro that the drivers would still work.  Both bestBuy and HP assured me that was the case, so…

        As for the upgrade process, I’m tempted to try the article that Alex had noted, because it would turn a lengthy process in a five minute one.  Still, first make an image!

        Chuck Billow

        • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  CWBillow.
        • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  CWBillow.
        • #1746768 Reply

          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Did you buy your upgrade to Pro from Microsoft?
          If not, I’m not surprised it was invalid.
          There are a lot of illegal dealings out there, even from Amazon.

          • #1747146 Reply

            CWBillow
            AskWoody Plus

            I bought the upgrade along with the laptop, from BestBuy, but it was shipped from Microsoft.  I was a bit surprised that it didn’t work.  Came in the envelope with the scratch-off to reveal the number, and I was trying to just replace the Home # and avoid having to install.  Glad I did that, because at least I found out quicker!  Called MS, they checked it and said “No, that number isn’t valid.  So go back to the dealer and they’ll fix it.”  They did — or at least are in the process of fixing it, so the hope is that this one will work!

            Chuck Billow

        • #1746769 Reply

          MrJimPhelps
          AskWoody_MVP

          Good to see you here at Ask Woody, Chuck!

          Group "L" (Linux Mint)
          with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
          • #1747147 Reply

            CWBillow
            AskWoody Plus

            Yea, Jim, now I can stumble along here!  Not sure what I would do without all the people here.

            Chuck Billow

            • #1813269 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody_MVP

              You had to start over here from square 1 – too bad you couldn’t have retained your platinum status from WS!

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1746883 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      You have a new laptop pre-installed with Windows 10 Home: why not follow up on Risk’s information in #1746551, Rick’s recommendation in #1746616 and/or Alex5723 recommendation in #1746601?
      — Those are the natural procedures to accomplish for what you are looking for and Microsoft support will be available if you ever need them.

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #1746986 Reply

      Rick Corbett
      AskWoody_MVP

      Chuck – The topic title is Restoring Win 10 Plus drivers. A Reset of Windows 10 (from within Settings) is *not* a restore.

      If your new laptop has a Restore function (from a function key shown on the HP boot screen?) then this will probably point to an ‘OEM Restore’ partition… which – if you used it – would wipe out any upgrade to a Pro edition by re-installing the original Home edition.

      Once you’re carried out the upgrade from Home to Pro then IMO any HP-created ‘restore’ partition is pretty much useless… but fulfils HP’s legal obligation to provide a ‘Factory Restore’ method in the absence of (re-)installation media.

      That’s all well and good… *except* if:

      a) You upgrade the original edition to another edition and/or;
      b) Your hard disk fails.

      If either of these two conditions occur then you have a world of re-configuring to do ‘cos you’ll be starting from scratch again.

      IMO the most expedient method of achieving what I *think* you are trying to achieve is to carry out a clean install (see my first post). You’ll lose any OEM-provided Restore partition (if you do a *complete* clean install) but – on the other hand – will recover any disk space allocated to an ‘OEM  Restore’ partition that will immediately become of little use to you the moment you upgrade editions.

      (Note: When I buy new PCs/laptops on behalf of family/friends I *always* take a complete image backup [using Macrium Reflect] before it’s first powered up into Windows for the first time. That way I can always re-create the pre-OOBE environment, even if the disk fails or if the device is eventually sold on. I suggest you do that now, if you haven’t already.)

      Hope this helps…

    • #1747060 Reply

      Barry
      AskWoody Plus

      This may be somewhat off topic but there is another way to get a clean installation of WIN10 and that is the fresh start option in the security section of settings.

      I use it after every new version of Windows comes out. Not sure but i never see anyone mention this.

       

      Barry (Seeker)
      Windows 10 Home V 1903

      • #1747148 Reply

        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        This may be somewhat off topic but there is another way to get a clean installation of WIN10 and that is the fresh start option in the security section of settings.

        It doesn’t appear to be off-topic but – from what I can see in older versions of Windows 10 – it appears to be a link/method to access Windows 10’s internal ‘Reset’ mechanism.

        A Windows 10 1903 ‘Search’  results in ‘not found’… so I guess the ‘fresh start’ nomenclature has been deprecated in favour of this version’s preferred phrase.

        • #1747597 Reply

          b
          AskWoody Plus

          A Windows 10 1903 ‘Search’ finds Fresh start in Device performance & health (Windows Security); it’s not deprecated:
          How to Easily Reinstall Windows 10 Without the Bloatware

          Knuckle dragger Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Crazy/Ignorant Toxic drinker Blockhead Unwashed mass Seeker/Sucker "Ancient/Obsolete" (Group ASAP) Win10 v.1903

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1747143 Reply

      CWBillow
      AskWoody Plus

      Rick, I imagine I was being unclear.  Somehow early on (last week!) HP walked me through a reset.  That gave me back the “out of the box” setup.  That was fine at that point, but I had ordered W-10 Pro, and realized that what you are saying was and is true, that once that upgrade was performed, the reset was or would be worthless.  That left me, and still leaves me with the one question I came away with:  What if I need for some reason to restore a driver?  I didn’t get copies of such (separate from the recovery partition).

      In trying to find the answer to THAT question, I saw that what you are saying totally applied.  I still am unclear as to the means by which I could restore a driver if need be — oh, except to take the laptop into BestBuy for service!

      I would so much rather have had them hand me a set of DVD’s containing the drivers if need be.  In that way driver backup software does serve one purpose in that when you have your system all set up, you can make a backup of any and all of the drivers just in case.

      Chuck Billow

      • #1747152 Reply

        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        I think you may be overly concerned about hardware drivers. If they are not automatically installed during/shortly after the installation of Windows 10 then they will be available from the OEM’s website.

        I use the portable version of Speccy to save a list of hardware configurations.

        For example, I almost *always* carry out clean installs (*really* clean, meaning that I wipe out *all* partitions) on the Dell laptops I have available. The hardware drivers are always re-installed automatically as part of the *initial* Win 10 installation process with 3 exceptions. Post-installation the display and touchpad drivers take about 5 minutes to work out, download and install the latest OEM drivers… via Windows Update. The *only* anomaly is the Dell security driver(s) which – depending on the model – ‘drives’ the fingerprint reader and/or the HDD’s ‘freefall protection’. These one or two I have to download/install directly from Dell itself (so I have them saved already ‘cos I do a fair amount of testing and carry out clean installs fairly regularly).

        Hope this helps…

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1747332 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      Rick, I imagine I was being unclear.  Somehow early on (last week!) HP walked me through a reset.  That gave me back the “out of the box” setup.  That was fine at that point, but I had ordered W-10 Pro, and realized that what you are saying was and is true, that once that upgrade was performed, the reset was or would be worthless.  That left me, and still leaves me with the one question I came away with:  What if I need for some reason to restore a driver?  I didn’t get copies of such (separate from the recovery partition).

      In trying to find the answer to THAT question, I saw that what you are saying totally applied.  I still am unclear as to the means by which I could restore a driver if need be — oh, except to take the laptop into BestBuy for service!

      I would so much rather have had them hand me a set of DVD’s containing the drivers if need be.  In that way driver backup software does serve one purpose in that when you have your system all set up, you can make a backup of any and all of the drivers just in case.

      Chuck, thanks for your updated information.

      For your drivers, you might find these interesting.

      I use this to back up my drivers in my external HDD.
      — I haven’t had to restore any but instructions are included in this tutorial.
      Backup and Restore Device Drivers in Windows 10
      https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/68426-backup-restore-device-drivers-windows-10-a.html#option3
      Option One: To Back Up All Device Drivers in Command Prompt
      Option Two: To Back Up All Device Drivers in PowerShell
      Option Three: To Restore a Device Driver Backup in Device Manager

      I haven’t used this one but it allows you to display the list of all device drivers currently loaded on your system
      by creating a CVS/Tab-Delimited File.
      List all Drivers http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/driverview.html

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #1747333 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      I think you may be overly concerned about hardware drivers. If they are not automatically installed during/shortly after the installation of Windows 10 then they will be available from the OEM’s website.

      I use the portable version of Speccy to save a list of hardware configurations.

      For example, I almost *always* carry out clean installs (*really* clean, meaning that I wipe out *all* partitions) on the Dell laptops I have available. The hardware drivers are always re-installed automatically as part of the *initial* Win 10 installation process with 3 exceptions. Post-installation the display and touchpad drivers take about 5 minutes to work out, download and install the latest OEM drivers… via Windows Update. The *only* anomaly is the Dell security driver(s) which – depending on the model – ‘drives’ the fingerprint reader and/or the HDD’s ‘freefall protection’. These one or two I have to download/install directly from Dell itself (so I have them saved already ‘cos I do a fair amount of testing and carry out clean installs fairly regularly).

      Hope this helps…

      Rick does this mean you are clean installing on bare metal?
      — I’m interested in that idea so that’s why I’m asking.
      “For example, I almost *always* carry out clean installs (*really* clean, meaning that I wipe out *all* partitions) on the Dell laptops I have available.”

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

      • #1747398 Reply

        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        Rick does this mean you are clean installing on bare metal?

        A bit off-topic but IMO this topic isn’t about a bare metal install.

        I’ve re-purposed dozens of devices which have previously been licensed for eligible, earlier versions of Windows. Once a Win 10 ‘Digital License’ is stored then I haven’t had a problem (re-)activating… even though I have wiped all partitions and carried out a *totally* clean install many, many  (dozens of…) times using the same device… and have not yet run into a problem re-activating.

        (Nearly two months ago I *did* carry out a Windows 7 *upgrade* and had to use MS’ telephone support helpline. Gah!… whilst ultimately succesful, I was on the phone for over 40 minutes… not something I would like to repeat.)

        Hope this helps…

        1 user thanked author for this post.

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