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  • Running Linux on old laptop??

    Posted on LHiggins Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    This topic contains 85 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by

     JohnW 2 days, 14 hours ago.

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    • #341924 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      Hello! Everyone here has been very helpful in my quest for a possible replacement of Win 7 with Linux. Today I have a question about trying out Linux on an old laptop that I have that I no longer use, before I try to make the switch on my “good” laptop.

      Here are the specs:

      It is a 2007 HP dv6700 Notebook running Vista 32 bit. It has a Core 2 duo T5550 1.83 GHz processor with 3 GB ram – about 3/4 of that is currently free. It also has a DVD drive.

      It does not connect to the Internet and I am not sure if it has a wireless card even – which I guess would be an issue – something to check into.

      I very rarely start it up just to see if it still works – it used to have a wake from sleep issue that I am testing now – it seems to boot from complete shutdown without issues now – that wasn’t always the case, but maybe being used only once or twice a year for 10 minutes has somehow cured that?

      I also don’t even have a battery for it anymore.

      My question then – could I possibly try installing Linux on it – I could download it onto a DVD from my working desktop computer possibly.

      What might I need to check or know before doing that and would it be able to handle a light version of Linux.

      Thanks for the help and suggestions! And please feel free to say – no way would that work  since it is quite old and slow – LOL!

      LH

    • #341940 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Plugged into the mains with ethernet connection for internet access, you’re certain to be able to use it online as a stationary device.
      For your assistance, there’s more info on linux here:
      https://linuxjourney.com/

      My recommendation would be to look at LXQT, LXDE or XFCE versons of linux see:
      https://distrowatch.com/index.php?distribution=all&release=all&month=all&year=all

      MX Linux 32/64bit (XFCE) will run no problem with that H/W setup which comes, as standard, with a multitude of utilities to further enhance your experience and tweak the OS over time.
      Probably best to use a flashdrive to store the iso for installation as you’ll find later that if this distro isn’t for you, you can nuke and create a different distro live iso without wasting CD’s. Your Lappy should boot from usb (bios setting)

      | W10 Pro x64 1803 | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64/ XP Pro O/L
        Can't see the wood for the trees? Look again!
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    • #341939 Reply

      anonymous

      ? says:

      hi LHiggins,

      your HP will run Linux, find a distro (Disrtowatch)        https://distrowatch.com/

      you like and download the ISO and unpack it (make it bootable) on a dvd or usb stick, set your bios to boot from the media and give it a whirl. enjoy!

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    • #341944 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Plus

      You could try booting a “live” session with Ubuntu to check the hardware. The install media will boot to a “live” session to allow to you test your system before you decide to install it on the hard disk.

      Get Ubuntu here: https://www.ubuntu.com/download

      Here are the various official “flavors”, or desktop environments (DE) of Ubuntu. https://www.ubuntu.com/download/flavours

      With older hardware I would start out with Lubuntu https://lubuntu.me/ or Xubuntu https://xubuntu.org/  as they have lighter desktop environments (LXQt; Xfce). So that means somewhat lighter RAM and CPU resource demands than the flagship Ubuntu distro.

      LXQt – https://lxqt.org/

      Xfce – https://xfce.org/

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    • #341976 Reply

      DavidForrest57
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve trodden this path myself, on an even older Dell Latitude D600 (ca. 2003).

      I found this helpful:

      https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/14912/create-a-persistent-bootable-ubuntu-usb-flash-drive/

      In the end I settled on installing Xubuntu 18.04, dual booting with the original XP Pro SP3.

      You’ve got lots of options, as other posters have attested. You can even load a USB stick with several distros using YUMI; I wish I’d known that earlier as I was scrabbling around for spare USB sticks!

      The Linux & Ubuntu distros work with ethernet connection out of the box, but sometimes getting the wi-fi working needs some investigation.

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    • #342006 Reply

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hm, yeah, it should work. Might prefer to upgrade the RAM if you find spare 4 GB DDR2 SODIMM modules real cheap.

      A dv6700 usually has an Intel 4965 for wifi, that model should work “out of the box” – needs closed firmware but Intel allows redistribution.

      One of the “lighter” desktop environments is recommended – even if the dv6700 might have a Geforce 8400M GS. I should still have at least one of the non-M version stashed around here somewhere… it at least used to be an excellent GPU for Linux (and I mean better than for Windows even when fairly new, the hardware h.264 decode feature never worked with Windows and…).

      I mean, I have one laptop of approximately the same age in daily use, should be the same motherboard chipset too. Running Xubuntu 16.04 here.

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    • #342026 Reply

      Berton123
      AskWoody Lounger

      Numerous version of the Bootable Linux LiveDVD or LiveCD as well as installed versions have the USB Image Writer feature, works good but the USB drive may be reformatted.  This image is from my Linux Mint 19.x Desktop:

      Screenshot-from-2019-03-15-14-01-54
      I should mention that the latest Linux Mint I could get to work on an old Dell Notebook with the Centrino ‘feature’ was Version 13.

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    • #342041 Reply

      DrBonzo
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve got Ubuntu 16.04 LTS running just fine on an old (2009) HP laptop with 4 GB memory and an AMD processor. Runs much faster than it did with the original Vista. If you want wireless get a usb dongle from Panda Wireless. I’m using a PAU06 for $10 after the wireless on the HP gave up. Panda makes a variety of wireless stuff. Mine worked flawlessly – true plug and play.

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    • #342068 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      Wow – so much great information! Thanks so much everyone. Now I’ll need to really digest it and hopefully be able to formulate some questions.

      Much appreciated!!

    • #342263 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      OK I have done some reading and investigating and I do have a few questions if anyone might be able to help.

      First off – the wireless on that laptop does work, so no need for a USB dongle – but thanks for those suggestions. I got it to connect and actually managed to download a current version of Firefox on Vista – though at this point it is running without current AV software – which I am looking into addressing now.

      As to the Linux setup – from what I gather reading this and several other AW discussions about Linux, I think these are the steps I should follow:

      1. Find the flavor of Linux I like from the sites mentioned. Right now, that looks like possibly Lubuntu or Xubuntu?

      2. Create a bootable USB stick with that flavor of Linux to try out. If I don’t like that one – try another. I’m not sure I’d need a persistent USB since I think my goal is to find the one that works with my hardware and then look into a dual boot with that and the old Vista.

      3. Change the boot order on the laptop to accommodate the bootable USB.

      4. If that all works, then tackle the dual boot process to install the Linux I like on the laptop itself.

      And a few questions about all of this:

      -Even though the Vista laptop does connect to the internet, can I download and create the bootable USB on either my desktop or other laptop and then use it in the Vista computer?

      -Is creating a bootable USB better than a bootable CD/DVD?

      -What programs from the Windows side will still run on the Linux side – or do they all need to be reinstalled – like Open Office, Adobe PDF etc? Will I still be able to view the files that I have created such as pictures or documents?

      -Will the hardware work on both – the DVD drive on the laptop for instance?

      I also came across the image below in one of the articles I was reading – does anyone know what version of Linux it might be?

      Thanks for any help or guidance as I move forward. I am pretty well versed in Windows, but this Linux-live session-dual boot thing is all new to me, so I am glad to be practicing on that old laptop!

      ETA – and I guess one other question would be which versions have the longest support? I’ve seen some that are “good” till 2023 – is there a way to tell and how upgradeable are those that don’t have support lasting that long?

      Thanks again!

      LH

      Linux

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         LHiggins.
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      • #342324 Reply

        anonymous

        ? says:

        hi again, LH

        i can see the image now and that looks like Ubuntu (probably using Unity) on the “Home,” folder. if you try Ubuntu 18.04 you can download a small netboot iso (65.2MB) and then customize it fully from there.

        Desktop:

        https://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

        Alternative Downloads:

        https://www.ubuntu.com/download/alternative-downloads

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      • #342333 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        If that all works, then tackle the dual boot process to install the Linux I like on the laptop itself.

        Not sure you will need the dual boot step, as that should be unnecessary if your goal is to actually replace Windows Vista on the old laptop.

        And a few questions about all of this:

        -Even though the Vista laptop does connect to the internet, can I download and create the bootable USB on either my desktop or other laptop and then use it in the Vista computer?

        The install/live boot media can be created anywhere. It is not tied to the target computer in any way. Truly portable!

        -Is creating a bootable USB better than a bootable CD/DVD?

        Both get the job done. DVD-RW is cheaper. With the right tools, you can store more than one bootable image on a USB flash drive. Flash is probably faster for booting the live session. Booting from DVD usually loads the image into a virtual RAM disk, so running would probably be about the same speed as flash. You can create persistent storage when using a flash drive.

        -What programs from the Windows side will still run on the Linux side – or do they all need to be reinstalled – like Open Office, Adobe PDF etc? Will I still be able to view the files that I have created such as pictures or documents?

        Windows only applications will not run as native Linux apps, but there are many comparable replacements that can open Windows files. Some Windows apps can be configured to run using a Linux tool called Wine, but it’s usually easier to learn the replacements. I use LibreOffice on both Windows and Linux (it’s cross-platform), and have not bothered with MS Office in years. Most Linux distros provide a pre-installed office suite, PDF reader, media players, utilities, and there are a ton of additional apps you can also add through the online application repository for that distro.

        Windows files are readable from Linux, so you can easily share an external drive, flash drive, server storage, or cloud storage between Windows and Linux computers.

        -Will the hardware work on both – the DVD drive on the laptop for instance?

        Most hardware has drivers for plug and play use. The live session should give you a feel for the distro that is most compatible with your hardware.

        I also came across the image below in one of the articles I was reading – does anyone know what version of Linux it might be?

        That looks like an older version of Ubuntu.

        – and I guess one other question would be which versions have the longest support? I’ve seen some that are “good” till 2023 – is there a way to tell and how upgradeable are those that don’t have support lasting that long?

        The use of the term LTS (Long Term Support) with the distro version is the tip that will be around until the stated end of support date. Anything else is usually part of a fast release cycle, so those are to be avoided if you want stability over leading edge new features.

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        • #342400 Reply

          LHiggins
          AskWoody Plus

          Hi John and thanks for all of the detailed info!

          I think that you may be right about not actually needing the dual boot – I guess I was thinking that I might want a Windows boot on that laptop – but Vista is so old, and it probably isn’t something that I would be able to use for much than offline stuff. I guess after I play around with the live boot USB versions, I will look into just replacing Vista with the distro I like. I know there is a thread about doing just that somewhere here on Ask Woody – I’ll have to look for it.

          Thanks again!!

          LH

          ETA – something that just occurred to me though – I am doing all of this as sort of a test for possibly replicating it all on my newer Win 7 laptop. In that case I probably would want a dual boot with Win 7 – not that I’d use Win 7 that much, but I would want to try to keep it. My computer guys say that they may be able to add some RAM to the Win 7 laptop, so if the Vista experiment is a success, the newer laptop may work out even better. In any case – I may just want to practice with dual boot to be sure I know what I’m doing if I try it all on the Win 7 one later on.

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             LHiggins.
    • #342284 Reply

      anonymous

      ? says:

      yes to the first question, you can additionally make a partition for a usb stick to boot on any computer as well.

      as microfix stated above, if you burn the chosen iso to a usb stick, you can reuse it. i haven’t tried to put an image on a cd+rw (under 700MB) or a dvd+rw (4.7 GB).

      not sure which programs are compatible, i use ubuntu which comes with all the bells and whistles i need (Libre Office, disk partitioner, image file reader, pdf reader in fact the list is extensive and there are many add-ons and tools available).

      your hardware “should,” all be recognized, if not there are work-a-rounds to get the job done.

      last question, i can’t see images here someone else may fill you in. i recommend getting your iso’s from Distrowatch and then verifying the checksums to avoid nedless hassles and possibly tampered images.

      personally, i run USB Ubuntu 14.04LTS until EOL in April this year and 16.04LTS EOL April, 2021 and 18.04LTS (long term support) 2023. i run them from 32GB Sandisks on an Acer laptop with Bios, 4GB ram, intel 7260 A\C wifi card, no HDD (take that bad guys). i add a 4GB fat 32 partition for “windows,” and can boot to other computers.

      i’m sure you will enjoy running Linux, Microsoft helped me get free of their chains when they decided to force feed my beloved Windows 7 machines the witches brew they call WINX. haven’t looked back since.

       

       

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      • #342401 Reply

        LHiggins
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks! It is going to be a bit of trial and error – but I am looking forward to actually taking the plunge – so far I’ve gathered a lot of info, but actually doing it is another matter – LOL!

        I agree with you about Win 7 and I am hoping that I will like Linux enough to not miss Win 7 when it ends. Actually my purpose here is to try this all out on the old laptop and eventually do the same thing on my Win 7 laptop if all goes well with the Vista one. I really love my Win 7 Lenovo and hate to just mothball it! Everything still works well, and I can really see no reason to spend hundreds on Win 10!

        Thanks!!

        • #342406 Reply

          anonymous

          ? says:

          you are welcome. when the winx thing started a couple\few years ago i did not want to “learn,” another operating system. my brother sent me a factory pressed Ubuntu 11.04 disk a few years back to use to fix an XP problem i was having and it came in handy. there are many people here on Woody’s site that can and would be glad to help you with getting started and any snags you may encounter along the way. i like ubuntu because there is lots of info on care and feeding on askubuntu, ubuntuforums and others. some folks here prefer Linux Mint so it must be good too. the only problem i have encountered with Ubuntu 18.04 is that my equipment refuses to run Gnome it it seems to like Unity so i downloaded Ubuntu-Unity-Experience and built 3 usb’s from there. if you can’t get an iso to load first time out trying a “lighter,” version will probably get you going. my 14.04 idles at 300-400 on memory, the 16.04 consumes 600-800 MB and the 18.04 is a hog at 800-1000, kinda like windows as the newer systems come along they become more and more resource hungry. not a problem on shiny new equipment but a consideration when running on “older,” vista era stuff. Ubuntu just quit producing 32bit when 18.04 arrived but there are many linux distros that will run on your computer. also, if you decide to work with Ubuntu may i suggest you download Synaptic package manager, it is great for taking control of the update process. i have my installations set to show Security only updates and i add newer non-security packages when appropriate. ubuntu comes with firefox as the browser which is nice, at least it is not IE and there is a great post from Microfix (AKB3000003) on securing it here:

          https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/3000003-firefox-additional-security-telemetry-and-privacy-tweaks/

          look forward to hearing about how the adventure continues!

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          • #343032 Reply

            LHiggins
            AskWoody Plus

            Thanks again! I will keep posting on my progress once I get it all sorted and give it a try. Everyone has been so helpful and I know that if I run into trouble – I’ll be able to find m=some answers and help here! 🙂

    • #342304 Reply

      Elly
      AskWoody MVP

      What programs from the Windows side will still run on the Linux side – or do they all need to be reinstalled – like Open Office, Adobe PDF etc? Will I still be able to view the files that I have created such as pictures or documents?

      To use programs on the Linux OS, you will need to install them. Depending on the distro you choose, some programs may come pre-installed.

      After you install and configure (decided how you want to set it up), you can move your data files over. You should be able to view all the pictures and documents, as well as create and save new ones. Keep in mind the size of your hard drive, and how you might utilize this particular computer (which you will get a better feel for, once it is installed, and you are working with it, hands on).

      I don’t have an extra old computer around, but I’m thinking of following your adventure with a VM of the same distro you choose. It really depends on how well I’m feeling as to whether I’ll really be able to keep up, but it is easier (for me) if I can compare what I’m doing to what someone else is doing. I’ve put Linux on computers, but those computers belong to other people… who seem happy, because once they get the basics down, and the programs they want, don’t seem to have a lot of problems.

      If you have any data (pictures, documents, etc) on this computer that you want to save, back it up, because installing a new OS will wipe it out. You can add it back, after the OS is installed.

      Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

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      • #342402 Reply

        LHiggins
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi Elly! Thanks for the reply and info.

        It would be great to have a partner in this adventure! I am still undecided on which distro to start with, but I am hoping to narrow things down in the next couple of days and give it a try. I’ll be happy to post back as I go – and we can compare notes on it all!

        Have a great weekend!

        LH

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    • #342383 Reply

      Berton123
      AskWoody Lounger

      A very real reason to use a Bootable USB drive is on those machines without an ODD/Optical Disc Drive.  For what I need I download the .iso file used to create the Bootable DVD [R flavor only] then when booted to that disc I can create the Bootable USB Thumb drive.   Having computer with Linux installed helps.  Burning/copying the .iso file to a disc is only simple storage.  I carry the Bootable USB Thumb drive when visiting clients’ sites ‘just in case’, sometimes helps when Windows won’t do what is needed, mostly in file management.

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    • #342443 Reply

      johnf
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just looked up the specs on the hp pavilion dv6700. Max Ram on that PC is 4 gigs (4GB (2 x 2GB) of PC2-5300 / DDR2 (667-MHz), so 2 sticks of 2 gig). You can get a replacement battery from Amazon, they aren’t too expensive. You’re likely running Vista 32 bit, which is why you’d only see 3 gigs of ram (since 32 bit windows systems won’t read above that). It’s likely you already have the max ram installed.

      Two things:

      1) If that is the original hard drive from 2007, I’d replace it with an SSD. You’ll get better performance; it could be issues with your hard drive that are causing Vista issues as well.

      2) I’d suggest not using regular Ubuntu (gnome) with less than 8 gigs ram. For your system, Lubuntu or Xbuntu are lighter and will give better performance. MX Linux (based on XFCE) is another good alternative to test, as it’s very light and fast.

      You can use Rufus (windows program) to burn a few iso’s onto 2-3 usb flash drives, and do a test drive to see what works best on that pc. It’s not hard, and you’ll get a better idea of what to install.

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      • #342451 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        Just looked up the specs on the hp pavilion dv6700. Max Ram on that PC is 4 gigs (4GB (2 x 2GB) of PC2-5300 / DDR2 (667-MHz), so 2 sticks of 2 gig)

        Same max RAM specs as my Core 2 Duo Asus F8Sn laptop, which is currently equipped with 8GB of RAM.  Intel claims the same 4GB max for the PM965 chipset the F8 uses, but quite evidently, the 4GB maximum is not accurate.  It works perfectly with 8 GB, passing the Memtest86+ for more than 12 straight hours.

        DDR2 4GB SoDIMMs were not cheap, and it may not be worth it to you, and certainly I would buy from somewhere that offers returns in case it doesn’t work, but in my case, it worked nicely.  It was suggested by some that only certain configurations of RAM (chip configurations on the SoDIMM PCBs) will work, but I can’t verify that.  I’ll look up the part numbers of my RAM that work if you would like to investigate it.

        2) I’d suggest not using regular Ubuntu (gnome) with less than 8 gigs ram. For your system, Lubuntu or Xbuntu are lighter and will give better performance.

        I’m running KDE Neon and Kubuntu (KDE Ubuntu), both 64-bit, on my Acer Swift with 4GB.  It works better than you might expect!

        I considered Mint Xfce at first, but the barebones nature of the desktop environment drove me nuts.  LXQt may be better, and I do like PCManFM-Qt the most of any lightweight file manager, but KDE works so well that I haven’t really had a reason to try it.

        KDE has long had a reputation as a resource hog, but KDE has done great work in reducing the RAM footprint. Right after booting, Neon reports right around 0.4 GB used. It’s not the OS or the desktop itself that demand more RAM–  it’s the programs you run on it that do, particularly browsers, and that will be the same regardless of desktop environment.  Chromium and Firefox both are known to be real resource hogs, though I’ve successfully run Firefox up to more than 100 tabs and it was still usable on the Swift.  Having the page file on a SSD really helps.

        Using a 32-bit version of Linux can save some of the RAM used by the browser, but the 32-bit world is reaching its sunset, and I considered the compatibility to be a greater benefit than the reduction in RAM usage.  The OS the Swift came with was 64-bit Windows, surely for the same reason.

        It’s not hard, and you’ll get a better idea of what to install.

        Very much agreed on that point!

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

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        • #343030 Reply

          LHiggins
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks for these suggestions. Everyone has been so helpful – not it is a matter of getting it all straight in my mind, picking one to try and actually doing it – LOL!

          Right now I am not ready to consider putting any money into the old laptop, but if I do find this experiment to be successful, I may consider adding RAM to my current Win 7 laptop if I decide to put Linux on it as a dual boot. We’ll see about that…

    • #342486 Reply

      DavidForrest57
      AskWoody Lounger

      I recently set up a dual-boot system with Xubuntu & Windows XP on an old Latitude D600 with 2GB of RAM.

      For anyone contemplating dual-booting Linux or Ubuntu with Windows you will likely be manipulating partitions on your HDD. Up until a month ago I hadn’t done anything like this, so if you are in the same boat, you may find the following helpful.

      Although some years old, I found this video to be the most useful:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0W7XYAB4cLc

      The poster recommends backing up your data and defragmenting the HDD before carrying out any work with partitions. Having researched this myself I would add that checking the disk for errors and fixing them can also head off potential problems with the partitioning process.

      I pretty much followed the process described, although I had to shrink the NTFS partition using a third party Windows program, EasUS Partition Master; for some reason I was never able to fathom, the Xubuntu installer (or the GParted component of it) was unable to do this step. Once I got the unallocated space, I proceeded as the video describes.

      I also found the following video interesting. It describes an alternative dual-boot set-up. I haven’t tested this myself as this procedure won’t work with Windows XP, but I might consider it if I do the same thing with my Windows 7 PC.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlTgaWs9BD0

      It’s a bit long, but stick with it!

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      • #342994 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        I pretty much followed the process described, although I had to shrink the NTFS partition using a third party Windows program, EasUS Partition Master; for some reason I was never able to fathom, the Xubuntu installer (or the GParted component of it) was unable to do this step.

        I’ve had Linux-based partition editors refuse to resize NTFS partitions before too.  I just tried it now using Gparted on my desktop PC, and it was perfectly willing to resize the Windows partition.  I am not really sure what the reason was before when it refused.

        It’s possible that the NTFS “dirty” bit was set, indicating that a disk check is needed, or that the Windows installation was shut down with hibernate or with fast startup enabled (for Windows 8 or 10 users), which lock the NTFS volume for safety.  When setting up dual-boot, it’s a good idea to disable these modes in Windows, though with Windows 7, that won’t be a concern.

         

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

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        • #343060 Reply

          DavidForrest57
          AskWoody Lounger

          I tried all the suggested “fixes” I could find, including defragmenting and running Chkdsk. GParted kept displaying a yellow warning triangle next to the NTFS partition, and I couldn’t make any changes. There’s one bad sector on the disk, that’s been there for years; I posted the problem on Ubuntu Forums, but nobody suggested that the bad sector was a problem in this regard.

          Even now, after successfully partitioning the disk via Windows and installing Xubuntu, that warning triangle is still there. Since I achieved what I wanted, I’m not concerned about it.

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      • #343028 Reply

        LHiggins
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks so much for these links,  David. I watched the first one and it was so helpful to see the step by step process. There are several others in that series that I bookmarked – great resources and much appreciated!

        • This reply was modified 1 week ago by
           LHiggins.
    • #344071 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      OK – some issues I’ve run into trying out a bootable USB and Linux. I am hopeful that someone might have some suggestions for me for addressing those. Here’s what I did.

      1. I created a bootable USB for Xubuntu 18.04 LTS. That went fine. I figured out how to change the boot order and put the USB hard drive choice first. It booted very slowly and I got quite a few error messages – which I didn’t get to copy 🙁  – but I will try to get them if they appear again.

      2. Eventually, after the errors, it came up to the Ubuntu splash screen and finally the Try Ubuntu choice. From there, it did boot to the desktop and I could check things out.

      3. The issue I am having is that I can’t figure out a way to connect to my WiFi. I did set up a new WiFi connection in the Network Connections – with my WiFi info and password. That all “took” but there is no way to access that connection to actually connect to it.

      So – is that not possible when using a Live USB set up? I did try to find the Network Administration Tool where the “Help” menu says that the connections will be showing, but I can’t seem to find that. It says in the System Menu to choose Network Administration, but I don’t have that choice.

      I would appreciate any suggestions on how to address this issue. In the meanwhile, i am going to reboot and try to see what the errors are and post those. I didn’t seem to be able to do a screenshot while those were showing, but I will try that again, too!

      ETA: Perhaps I need a wireless adapter as mentioned here: https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/great-wifi-adapter-for-linux-mint/#post-335260 The laptop connects fine when in Windows, but maybe it is a problem with the network card not being able to be used in Linux?

      Also  just restarted and got error messages again – will post them next. All booted OK though as before.

      Thanks for any help!!

      LH

      • This reply was modified 4 days, 17 hours ago by
         LHiggins.
      • #344078 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        This issue was discussed elsewhere around here: https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/great-wifi-adapter-for-linux-mint/

        Bottom line is that the network adapter model in your PC must have native support in Linux to be accessible out of the box during the live session. If it’s supported, all you would need to do is just select an available network ID and then enter the password to connect.

        You should not need to add or configure the network adapter itself, or configure the Wi-Fi connection.

        Ubuntu has built-in support out of the box for many brands of adapters and Wi-Fi chipsets, so if yours was not automatically detected and activated, it is probably on the “not fully supported” list.

        In many reports here and elsewhere, the Panda brand of USB Wi-Fi adapter with the Ralink chipset works very well with Linux out of the box, and the Ralink driver is baked into the Linux kernel. Panda is also good with Windows.

        I got a Panda USB adapter for $10 online, and it works well. In comparison, my Netgear N300 adapter with a Broadcom chipset has never worked with Linux.

        • This reply was modified 4 days, 17 hours ago by
           JohnW. Reason: Added link to Linux Wi-Fi adapter thread
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #344082 Reply

          LHiggins
          AskWoody Plus

          Hi John,

          Great minds – LOL! I was just adding that thought to my comment and you were posting the same. Perhaps that is the issue!

          A bit frustrating, but if that adapter addresses it – then it is worth the few $$. But is this “try Ubuntu” from a USB also something that might not allow the wifi to work?

          Thanks!!

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #344093 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Plus

            Actually, yesterday I just booted the latest releases of Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Lubuntu with the live USB boot and “try Ubuntu” mode. All worked flawlessly with my cheap Panda adapter.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344112 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              OK – looks like that might be the missing piece. I’ll check that on out on Amazon and order it. Does yours have a built in antenna as shown here:

              https://www.amazon.com/Panda-Wireless-PAU06-300Mbps-Adapter/dp/B00JDVRCI0/ref=sr_1_3

              And which of those Linux distros do you like better??

              • This reply was modified 4 days, 16 hours ago by
                 LHiggins.
            • #344132 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              No external antenna on mine. Just a basic USB dongle. I use the USB extension cable and dock that came with my Netgear adapter. It is ideal to locate the adapter device a short distance away from my computer chassis, but a plain USB extension cable will work fine for that purpose.

              I find that I get better Wi-Fi reception on a desktop tower that way, instead of plugging the USB dongle into the rear of the PC at floor level. The closer you are to an uninterrupted line of sight with your router or Wi-Fi hotspot, the better signal quality you will get. The USB extension cable will allow you to orient the adapter for the best signal.

              https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-Extension-Cable-Male-Female/dp/B00NH136GE/ref=sr_1_12_sspa

            • #344166 Reply

              Ascaris
              AskWoody_MVP

              Note also that Intel and Atheros/Qualcomm wifi adapters also work well with Linux out of the box. It seems that Broadcom has been the odd one out in that way.

              As far as which distro one prefers– that’s highly subjective, so there’s no real way to know which you like until you try them out, and you won’t really get the true picture of the desktop environment (which is the difference between the various flavors of Ubuntu) until you use it for a while.  I’d suggest trying a few out, see which one looks like it might be what you need, and use that for a while.  That will give you the knowledge to know what, if anything, the desktop you’re using is lacking, so people will be better able to advise you.

              Of the flavors listed, Kubuntu is my clear favorite.  I run a triple-boot setup on my desktop PC and my Dell G3 gaming laptop, with KDE Neon (User edition) as the main OS, Kubuntu 18.04 as the fallback if something goes wrong with Neon (as it has in the past for me), and Windows in case it’s needed (though it’s kind of like the vestigial feet on boa constrictors at this point).

              When I decided to try Linux again (I had used Ubuntu briefly years ago) when Windows 10 was released in 2015, Kubuntu was my original choice, but it had some serious issues, and I was not knowledgeable enough to fix any of them.  I tried Mint KDE, which worked perfectly, but in time I began to notice more and more rough spots in KDE that really bothered me.  I tried Mint MATE and didn’t care for it much… but Mint Cinnamon was really quite good, in my mind, and I used that for a few years before coming back to KDE once again.

              The thing that drove me away from Cinnamon was that it had consistently higher power consumption than KDE or Xfce desktops (on my Acer Swift laptop).  KDE actually bested Xfce by a small margin, which may have been simply the luck of the draw, but I was still surprised that KDE had done so well, given its reputation for being a resource hog.

              It turns out that KDE isn’t the bloated hog it used to be.  The devs have reduced its resource use greatly, and I found that most of the rough edges were gone.  In Neon, which gets KDE releases far more quickly than Kubuntu, they were all fixed, and that was when I made Neon my daily go-to.  I changed my desktop and laptop to KDE also, as I want to have them as identical as possible in their Linux setups for easy administration, and I’ve come to really appreciate how flexible and feature-complete KDE really is.  Even Cinnamon 4 feels lacking by comparison to me now, even though it appears to have fixed the battery use issue according to my preliminary tests.

              Your opinion may vary, though, and none of our opinions matter when it comes to your PC.  Try a few, see what you like, and if you find it wanting for something, we can better help you find what it is.

               

              Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #344198 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              I agree with the opinion on Kubuntu with the KDE Plasma desktop. That was the biggest surprise for me this week! It gets my vote now!  Close 2nd place for me would be Mint Cinnamon. For lightweight use on older hardware I would have said Lubuntu and Xubuntu, with a slight preference for Lubuntu with the new LXQt desktop. It’s a bit more modern looking than the old school Xfce.

              But I think Kubuntu may actually check that box for a lightweight, high performing desktop now! Obviously YMMV, and you should test the distros on your hardware. These are just my opinions based on unscientific testing!

              I had played around about 15 years ago with Red Hat Linux 9 (my first Linux install) and then Fedora Core, installing it on a couple of spare PCs. Just wanting to learn a bit about Linux, but still a committed Windows user back in the day. Probably just the vestigial mainframe geek in me acting out. 🙂

              Then about 5 years ago I built a custom desktop PC specifically for Linux, and used it as my daily driver for a couple of years.

              I started with Ubuntu, mainly due to the active community and amount of support info available online. But the Unity desktop environment (DE) is what eventually drove me away from Ubuntu. I felt like I was always fighting with Unity just to do basic tasks that were effortless to me in a more conventional “Windows” style UI. Ubuntu has since switched to Gnome 3, but that is only a slight improvement.

              So then I tried Kubuntu, which probably had an early release of the KDE Plasma DE. Looked great, but I encountered too many bugs for daily use. Then I tried switching to Mate desktop for Ubuntu, which looked good, but was buggy for me as well.

              So then I figured that Linux Mint, the developer of the Mate desktop should know how to do it best. So I tried Mint Mate and Cinnamon.

              I decided that Mint Cinnamon was the keeper! Good looks, smooth workflow, reliable. It is the only Linux distro that I still have installed on a hard drive (on one dual boot machine).

              I have been back to Windows as my daily driver for a while now, but I keep a couple of Linux virtual machines around. One is Linux Mint (on my Win10 desktop host) and the other is Xubuntu (on a Win10 laptop with only 4GB RAM).

              So just this week I decided to take some of the latest Ubuntu and Mint flavors for a spin using a live boot. I am very impressed with Kubuntu now, as the developers have really polished it up since I last tried it.

              As far as looks and workflow go, I would have to say I would be happy with either Kubuntu or Mint Cinnamon now as daily drivers.

              My biggest surprise was how light and efficient Kubuntu is now! It only took about 430MB RAM at idle. It seemed very snappy and responsive as well! The system monitor showed that I was only using about 900MB even with Firefox open with 3 tabs, and one streaming audio.

              By comparison, on my hardware, Ubuntu ran about 1.4GB at idle, Mint Cinnamon about 900MB, Mint Mate about 800MB, Lubuntu about 800MB, and Xubuntu about 700MB.

               

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344206 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              Thanks so much for all of that information! I think that I am going to give Kubuntu a try tomorrow. A question – is the KDE plasma desktop a part of it or a separate download? And also – which should I be using – 32 bit or 64 bit on my old machine? I think the Xubuntu is 64 bit and seems fine except for those error messages – loads slowly, but once it is booted past the messages, it’s fine.

              Quite a learning curve, and I do wish that the WiFi did work right from the start, but I’m going to go ahead and order a Panda adapter and hopefully that will address that issue.

              Thanks for all of the help – everyone is great in this forum!

            • #344242 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              KDE Plasma is a desktop environment for Linux. It is an included part of the official (Ubuntu) Kubuntu flavor distro, and that is what puts the “K” in Kubuntu, as that is the desktop it is built around.

              GNU/Linux is the operating system underneath it all, and one can use any of several mainstream desktop environments available. A Linux “distro” usually packages one desktop environment for each ISO, and you download the ISO with the desktop that you prefer.

              Advanced users can actually install more than one desktop on a Linux system, and then switch between them. I have tried this, and it can get confusing and messy, so it is usually cleanest to start with the desktop flavor that you want at install time.

              I would also stick with a 64-bit OS if that is what your laptop supports.  It really shouldn’t have much of a performance difference from a 32-bit OS.  A 64-bit OS can run both bit levels of apps, but if your OS is only 32-bit, then you are limited to only 32-bit apps.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344351 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              OK – just getting around to it today and of course, another question. I think that the Vista OS on the HP laptop is 32 bit, so does that mean I can’t use a 64 bit Linux version? Or does one not really affect the other?

              My plan of attack is to create a Yumi USB drive with several distros as suggested, and give them each a try. When I do find one that I like, I’m probably going to experiment with persistent USB for a bit rather than a dual boot.

              Thanks for all of the help!

              LH

               

            • #344368 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              One OS will not affect the other, as only one at a time is booted into memory. The other is dormant on the disk drive. Same goes for the live boots. They are not aware of the OS sitting on the hard drive.

              And FYI, your Intel Core 2 Duo Processor T5550 supports 64-bit. Specs: https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/32427/intel-core-2-duo-processor-t5550-2m-cache-1-83-ghz-667-mhz-fsb.html

              However you may be able to mount and read the internal hard drives (Windows or Linux partitions) while in Linux live mode. That can make live Linux useful for data rescue when a system cannot boot the installed OS. Just attach another USB storage device and copy folders!

              • This reply was modified 3 days, 20 hours ago by
                 JohnW. Reason: added Intel Core 2 specs
              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344276 Reply

              johnf
              AskWoody Lounger

              I’ve had very good results (Mint and MX 18) with this one:

              https://www.amazon.com/Panda-Ultra-150Mbps-Wireless-Adapter/dp/B00762YNMG/ref=sr_1_7?crid=7YQEE6EPEESS&keywords=panda+wireless&qid=1553230765&s=gateway&sprefix=panda+wir%2Caps%2C150&sr=8-7

              The adapter is small, but I get excellent results. I like the small form factor, as the bigger external wireless adapters are easy to damage accidentally. A google search on your Pavilion shows issues in Linux with the built in adapter (likely Broadcomm). While with a lot of work you might get it to work using a program called ndiswrapper (and the original windows driver), it’s likely the original card won’t work very well. I’m very happy with the Panda!

              • This reply was modified 4 days, 7 hours ago by
                 johnf.
            • #344323 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              Good suggestion! That is similar to the Panda USB that I have, and mine works great, plug and play, with any Linux distro that I have tested with a live boot.

              Regarding the Broadcom issue, as you have mentioned, there are probably ways to get that to work with some effort.

              But keep in mind that it’s the OP’s intent right now to just get a live distro working with Wi-Fi. So not having to install or tweak anything is probably a requirement at this point for his testing of various distros.

              Later on, after installing Linux, he might be up to hacking the Broadcom, but with the Panda USB in hand he won’t need to be focusing on that right now. On the plus side he will always have an adapter that he knows will work with Linux, and can use it on any other computer he might want to test Linux on in the future.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #344081 Reply

        anonymous

        ? says:

        if the reboot did not sort out the wifi, does your laptop have an indicator (light) when the wifi is on? if it is on then you should be able to connect.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #344109 Reply

          LHiggins
          AskWoody Plus

          It does, but I am not sure if it was lit. In any case – there was nowhere to actually tell it to connect though. No connection icon or anywhere to choose my wifi network.

          • #344128 Reply

            mn–
            AskWoody Lounger

            Could be it’s just turned off. Many laptops have a separate switch for that somewhere.

            What’s annoying is when that switch is a poorly made part and breaks… even more annoying when it’s a “soft switch” that defaults to off on every boot, and is also broken to not turn on no matter how you press it. BTDT.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344228 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              Thanks – but unless the Xubuntu somehow turned it off, it was on when I was booted into Windows, so that’s probably not it either! Too bad – that would be an easy fix!

            • #344288 Reply

              mn–
              AskWoody Lounger

              Well, theoretically not impossible – “rfkill list” should tell you the status in any case.

          • #344126 Reply

            anonymous

            ? says:

            System Settings>Network, to get to your adapter. i remember someone asked what type of wifi card was onboard? if it is an intel 4965agn, it “should work,” most of the cards have proper drivers ready to go. if you get the indicator light then the system has recognized it and you “should,” be able to connect to it. i’ve had to reboot in the past using efi and bios because the WPA Supplicant doesn’t have time during boot to set up. also, if your card is N and your router is broadcasting in AC only you may not have (see) a connection? probably easier to plug in a wifi adapter, personally, i don’t give up until everything is functioning properly. do any of the distro’s you have tried make your wifi available? have you tried ether NIC?

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344211 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              So far I’ve only tried Xubuntu – but I am going to do some more experimenting tomorrow. I don’t have a router – I use a Sprint WiFi hotspot for my internet. Since it works when in Windows, I know that the wireless card in the laptop and my Sprint device do work – so I guess the variable is Linux. I am looking into the USB adapter that JohnW suggested since it does say tha tit supports many Linux distros.

            • #344252 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              I live booted into Xubuntu earlier tonight, and the network icon on the panel on the upper right of the UI was represented as two arrows, one up and one down.

              I clicked on it and was given a choice of nearby Wi-Fi networks detected.

              I selected mine and was prompted for my Wi-Fi password. Entered it, and was up and running in seconds. The network icon was now changed to the standard wireless beacon symbol.

              Plug and play here, no network configuration needed. 🙂

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344372 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              Just wanted to update this in case I had missed something. I booted to Xubuntu and there is the network icon – up and down arrows – which is greyed out. I can click on it and the Enable Network choice is checked, but when I click Edit Connections – the only other choice that isn’t greyed out, it just shows an Ethernet connection that must be included in Xubuntu – which I don’t use and didn’t create.

              But – no choice of my WiFI network, so that wireless card in the laptop obviously isn’t working. I am going to order one of the Panda USBs later today so I should have that by early next week to do that testing.

               

            • #344385 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              Yup, that sounds like your on-board wireless adapter was not available to Linux. Hope your new adapter arrives quickly, and works as advertised!

              Onboard Ethernet jacks are one thing that Linux has been able to easily detect in a PC for years.

              So if you had a wired network router with RJ45 Ethernet LAN ports available, you could just run an Ethernet cable from your laptop to your router to get online. I used to do that on occasion before I got a Linux compatible wireless adapter. But what a hassle that was! I even had a 50ft cable just for that purpose! A definite tripping hazard, for sure! 🙂

            • #344390 Reply

              Microfix
              AskWoody MVP

              Before you order a usb wifi adapter..
              Try typing the following command into the terminal once xubuntu is up and running.
              inxi -Fz
              I can’t remember if xubuntu comes with the inxi program but, what this does is give you a detailed list of the hardware inside your laptop (without sensitive data mac address etc. the -Fz switch)
              Then have a look for your wifi card data in the terminal hardware list (note it down), some are disabled due to windows being installed previously and ignored as windows used to switch them off. It may actually work once commands are issued to the wifi card. I had this issue with an atheros Ath5k wifi card a few years back and managed to switch it on and it worked thereafter.

              | W10 Pro x64 1803 | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64/ XP Pro O/L
                Can't see the wood for the trees? Look again!
            • #344410 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              It appears that the wireless on that HP DV6700 laptop is the Intel PRO/Wireless 4965AGN.

              Maybe this is an issue with needing firmware that is “non-free”, which would likely exclude it from a “live” distro.

            • #344415 Reply

              Microfix
              AskWoody MVP

              Ok, that hasn’t been supported by ubuntu from circa 2007 with lots of unresolved issues.
              It is indeed a USB wifi adapter as a replacement 🙂

              | W10 Pro x64 1803 | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64/ XP Pro O/L
                Can't see the wood for the trees? Look again!
              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #344435 Reply

              anonymous

              ? says:

              i ran an intel 4965 in ubuntu 14 and 16, sometimes during boot the network manager did not set up properly so i could run this in the terminal:

              sudo service network-manager restart

              and it would reset and run. don’t know if you have used the terminal, though. also in the network>wireless>settings>general, in ubuntu 14.04 i had to have Automatically connect to this network when it is available, and All users may connect to this network ticked for it to connect reliably.

              this may help to troubleshoot:

              lspci | grep -i wireless   or    lspci | grep -i intel

              and this:

              sudo lshw -C network

              and this:

              lsmod | grep -i wifi

              or a wifi usb dongle as suggested to cut to the chase…

    • #344088 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      Live boot error messages – after the fact. They went by so quickly both times, and I can’t seem to get a screenshot, but here is the gist:

      ACPI Error: Name space lookup failure

      ACPI Error: Method parse/execution failed

      [a string of numbers I missed] drm_atomic_helper_wait_for_dependencies_ ERROR flip_done timed out.

      There were about 10 different instances of that message with a different number in the brackets.

      But – after showing all of those, it did finally boot to the Xubuntu desktop and was OK as far as I could tell.

      • #344184 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        I get those same errors (or ones really close) on one or more of my PCs (I think it was my desktop, but I am not sure).  Everything works once Linux is fully booted, so I don’t worry about them.  There’s something in one of the messages that says that it relates to a bug in my BIOS/UEFI, which is quite possible, but if it works anyway, I’m ok.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #344199 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        It’s quite normal to see some lines of text go scrolling up the screen as Linux boots. You are just getting a brief peek at the command line before the desktop loads.

        Linux is trying to probe all the hardware at boot time and decide what drivers to load. This process is generally hidden from the end user in Windows land, but if you search the Windows event viewer you can find plenty of “errors” in there that really don’t matter.

        If your system throws a few errors during the boot process, no worries! As long as you boot up and the desktop runs, you’re good!

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #344207 Reply

          LHiggins
          AskWoody Plus

          Glad those errors aren’t really errors! When they first started to appear, I was about ready to abort the boot process, but once I let it run, it was OK. I think the second time I booted it, it was a bit faster. And one thing I did notice – not that I was actually running much, but in the Xubuntu, the laptop was very smooth and very quiet. This laptop has a fan issue and in Windows, the fan seems to run a lot – so it was nice not to hear it while exploring Xubuntu.

          Ascaris – I also want to thank you for the great instructions that you posted in this discussion https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/linux-live-session-on-usb/#post-317035 which I followed as I went through the initial process – very helpful!

          And another question – somewhere someone posted about a program called YUMI to load several distros on one USB thumb drive. How would that work – it might be a convenient way to test several, but I’m not really clear how you’d know which one you were loading at a time.

          In any case – thanks so much for all of the great help!! Much appreciated! I will post more as I go though this – Kubuntu next (if I can find another USB stick to play with – LOL!).

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #344239 Reply

            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            Thanks, I am glad it was helpful!

            I just overwrite one Linux on the USB stick with the next one.  I hang on to all of the .isos, so it just takes a short while to write any of them on the stick as needed.  I don’t have any experience with Yumi, but I assume the selection of a distro would be done with the GRUB menu at boot time.

            I’d really like to have a bunch of USB drives that are more or less dedicated for one thing or another, but there are just too many things I need one for!  I was just looking today at buying a bunch of them… I really wish there were smaller ones that were cheaper, perhaps 1 to 2 GB, but still USB3 in speed.  A Windows USB would need more, but most Linux distros don’t need anything close to the full-DVD image size of Windows, let alone the 8GB that is typical of the cheapest USB 3 drives now.  Maybe an array that size is necessary to provide USB3 speeds, or something like that.  USB2 drives aren’t really any cheaper, if I go by the prices I just saw at Newegg earlier.

            Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

            • This reply was modified 4 days, 11 hours ago by
               Ascaris.
            1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #344248 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Plus

            YUMI: https://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/

            Well, I was in WalMart earlier this week and saw a 3-pack of 16GB SanDisk USB flash drives for a good price. 🙂

            So I downloaded YUMI, and it runs as a portable app, no install required.

            Just run YUMI:

            Plug in a blank USB flash. 1. Select the USB flash drive path in YUMI, 2. select the distro type, 3. then browse to the ISO for that distro, and click “Create”.

            I put 8 distros on one 16GB flash drive.

            When I boot with the drive, I am presented with the YUMI multiboot USB boot manager. I select “Linux Distributions” and it shows me the list of distros I installed in YUMI.

            Then I just scroll down to the distro I wish to boot and hit enter. Off and running! 🙂

            One note about the YUMI download page. The info on the two downloads is a bit confusing, but the first one is the latest version, so I downloaded it, even though the 2nd is supposedly for UEFI, it appears to be a beta of some sort.

            The main download YUMI-2.0.6.4.exe works fine on my UEFI-BIOS, as long as I select the non UEFI boot entry for the flash drive in my UEFI-BIOS boot menu.

            • This reply was modified 4 days, 10 hours ago by
               JohnW. Reason: added UEFI-BIOS comments
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344622 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              Hi John!

              I followed your steps here and ran YUMI – worked like a charm! Thanks so much for the guidance! I put Xubuntu, Lubuntu and Kubuntu on the stick and could access each easily. Perfect way to test.

              For info – I was getting those same “error” messages for each on, and each too quite a while to boot up. That is probably because my laptop doesn’t have  USB 3.0 so I was using a 2.0 stick as well. Will it be faster once I decide on one to try to actually install?

              Again – thanks for the help – YUMI was easy and worked as advertised.

            • #344627 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              Glad you found YUMI to be be helpful. This week was my first attempt with it as well. Now I am a YUMI believer, and it is a no-brainer solution as far as I can tell.

              Regarding the boot speed, I am using USB 2.0 as well. Creating the ISO image on the flash drive takes a bit of time to write on that. But my system boots in a “flash” from USB and Linux runs without any lag.

              For my system specs, I am running a desktop 3rd gen “Ivy Bridge” Intel Core i3 – 3.4GHz CPU with 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 RAM, so most Linux distros fly on this thing. I built the system with these specs in 2014 especially for a Linux install, and was not disappointed with the performance.

              Linux also loves old computers, and will run on most, but performance expectations need to be taken into consideration. I would expect a laptop over 10 years old to run a bit slower. The CPU, RAM, and bus architecture from Intel have seen huge improvements since the Core 2 days.

              Just work with what you have, and keep plugging away. At least Linux can give a 2nd life to older Windows hardware! You’re on the right track!

              Then and Now: Almost 10 Years of Intel CPUs Compared

              https://www.techspot.com/article/1039-ten-years-intel-cpu-compared/

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344628 Reply

              johnf
              AskWoody Lounger

              It is a good idea to test out some distros before installing. Some hardware seems to work better in different distros, some distros have better battery life, etc. A good source for distros and reviews is http://distrowatch.com (just ignore the rankings, that’s more of a small popularity poll for users who go there).

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #344629 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              Just FYI, that is exactly what he is trying to do, by working with live boots of various Ubuntu distros.

              But to be a bit more specific about your suggestion regarding hardware issues, he might want to try something other than a Ubuntu (Debian) based distro, and try alternatives such as Manjaro (Arch), Fedora (Red Hat/RPM), etc.

              https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=manjaro

              https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=fedora

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Linux_distributions

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Linux_distributions

               

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344668 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              Yes, I can see that the old Core 2 is really slow compared to others. My Win 7 laptop has an i5, so when I get to trying Linux on it, things should go more quickly.

              Thanks!

            • #344711 Reply

              DrBonzo
              AskWoody Lounger

              Perhaps this is a dumb question, but suppose I have a USB Flash drive with some Linux distros on it that I created with YUMI. If I plug that Flash drive into a PC, will that PC automatically boot from the Flash drive or do I still need to go into the BIOS and fiddle with it to set boot priority for a Flash drive?

              Thanks.

            • #344712 Reply

              PKCano
              Da Boss

              There is an “F” key that gives you a choice of media to boot from if pressed during bootup, without having to go into the BIOS and change the boot order.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344718 Reply

              DrBonzo
              AskWoody Lounger

              @pkcano – I didn’t realize that was an option. I’ve installed Ubuntu on a couple of computers and by far the most frustrating part of it was getting into the BIOS to reset the boot order (they were old computers and the best info I could find was “try one of the following6 options”, or something similar)

            • #344719 Reply

              PKCano
              Da Boss

              On a Dell it’s F12, on an HP ESC or F9 or F10 (can’t remember which) You just have to try – if it’s not the right one, try again 🙂

              1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #344201 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Plus

      Note also that Intel and Atheros/Qualcomm wifi adapters also work well with Linux out of the box. It seems that Broadcom has been the odd one out in that way. 

      That’s a good point. I couldn’t remember those earlier, so I was only speaking from personal experience about the Panda. Quick and cheap fix! 🙂

      My Broadcom stuff about drove me crazy until I caught on to that.

    • #344355 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      But keep in mind that it’s the OP’s intent right now to just get a live distro working with Wi-Fi. So not having to install or tweak anything is probably a requirement at this point for his testing of various distros. Later on, after installing Linux, he might be up to hacking the Broadcom, but with the Panda USB in hand he won’t need to be focusing on that right now. On the plus side he will always have an adapter that he knows will work with Linux, and can use it on any other computer he might want to test Linux on in the future.

      Correct John! Thanks! Yes, I want to work as much within what I currently have right now without doing much of anything as far as tweaks or other downloads. I had the idea to possibly just try this on my newer Win 7 laptop, but I looked up the wireless card, and that doesn’t seem to be support Linux either. I believe it is an Intel Centrino N2200.

      I do like the small form of the Panda 150 USB but my question is how strong will the signal need to be for it to work? Would the Panda 300 USB be a better choice even though it is a bit bigger? Not much cost difference. And you are right, having that will allow me to test and connect on any computer.

      Thanks again for all of the input. You all are great on this forum and I do really appreciate all of the help. I’ll ask more questions as I run into them – LOL! 🙂

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #344373 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m using a Panda 150Mbps about 25 feet away from my Wi-Fi router. Full signal strength here, with no walls and only one piece of furniture obstructing an otherwise clear line of sight point to point.

        The Panda 300Mbps might offer a faster network bitrate, but that does not increase the signal strength.

        Most of my networking is through my ISP cable broadband internet, which is only up to 50Mbps, so that is my real bottleneck, not my local wireless LAN, LOL!

        Kind of like using a 6 lane on-ramp to access a two lane highway. 🙂

        But if you were to use a home router and do a lot of wireless data transfer over a wireless LAN between your local computers and storage servers, the higher bitrate might be handy to have. In any case you would need to match your adapter’s speed with your router’s to get the full speed advertised.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #344453 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        I do like the small form of the Panda 150 USB but my question is how strong will the signal need to be for it to work? Would the Panda 300 USB be a better choice even though it is a bit bigger?

        From the numbers you provide, I am guessing that they are 802.11N spec wifi adapters. The 150 mbit would be a single-stream or 1×1 setup (single stream in, single stream out), while the 300 would be a dual-stream (2×2).  The dual-stream model will allow higher speeds when connected to a wifi access point with the same capabilities.  If the AP is only 1×1, there won’t be any speed advantage to the 2×2 adapter.

        Since you’re using a cellular wifi mobile hotspot, it would follow that only internet throughput matters, as opposed to LAN throughput, since there really isn’t one.  In that case, you only need to worry about making sure the wifi connection speed is at least as high as the speed of the cellular connection.  Any more speed than that on the wifi link won’t help if the cellular modem is already at its limit.  Based on the speed test performance that someone I know with cellular internet has reported, ~60 mbit or a bit more, the 1×1 connection should be more than enough– when you’re close to the access point.

        I can’t really say whether 2×2 would be any better at the outer reaches of the AP’s coverage area or not.  As the signal strength reduces, so does the speed potential, so it’s possible that at certain signal strengths, the 2×2, being twice as fast as the 1×1, might be able to maintain enough throughput to match the cellular link where the 1×1 would not.  It’s plausible, but I can’t really say for sure, as I’ve never done any testing of this idea. I’m sure someone somewhere has tested this for one of the tech sites, but I don’t know of any such articles offhand.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #344623 Reply

          LHiggins
          AskWoody Plus

          I did go ahead and order the Panda 300 adapter. Just thought that it might be better in a “public” environment if I do happen to use the laptop outside of my home. I had contacted Panda and they seemed to be hung up on how far I’d be from the hotspot and what the walls were made of, and couldn’t really tell me which would be better.

          In any case – I should get it Monday so I’ll see how it works. And if this all goes as planned, I will need it for my Win 7 laptop as well, since that is my ultimate goal – to get Linux running on that one day before Win 7 EOL comes along.

          Thanks for the info!

          • #344624 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Plus

            At any rate, for s couple of bucks more you get one that you can grow into. Smart buy!

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #344670 Reply

              LHiggins
              AskWoody Plus

              I hope so – LOL! I should get it Monday so that I can begin testing out how the wireless works.

              A question though – how will the wireless adapter work if I am using Vista/Windows? Should I unplug it when not in Linux so that there is no confusion, or will I get a choice of which to use if both are seen by the OS?

              Thanks!

            • #344737 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              It’s been a while, but when I first used the Panda USB on Win7 around 5 years ago, I believe that I had to install the Panda USB adapter driver for Windows.

              Since you are using Vista, you will probably need to add the driver. My Panda USB came with a driver disk. Don’t know if they still ship one these days, but anyway I think I downloaded the latest version directly from the Panda website at some point.

              Or you could just unplug the USB adapter when you boot Windows and Vista should be happy with the Intel if that works for you already.

    • #344657 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      If you haven’t yet decided which Linux distro to use, I suggest you try Elementary OS (https://elementary.io/). It is very lightweight and stable, and it is based on Debian, which means that you can run Mint and Ubuntu software.

      Elementary OS is free, so don’t be deterred by the prompt for a donation. You can enter zero if you like.

      The interface is a lot like the MAC, so it may take some getting used to.

      Elementary OS is the one Linux distro that runs well on my old eMachines Vista computer.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #344672 Reply

        LHiggins
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks for that suggestion – it looks beautiful! I have little experience with MAC, but all of these are going to be “new” to me, so there will be a learning curve no matter which I get. I will check it out along with several others suggested here!

        ETA: I wonder how that will work with my Panda wireless USB adapter?? Something to check out once I get it!

        • This reply was modified 2 days, 19 hours ago by
           LHiggins.
      • #344717 Reply

        LHiggins
        AskWoody Plus

        OK – I did download the Elementary OS and put it on the YUMI thumb drive. It booted up and actually did connect to my WiFi – no adapter needed. However, running off the thumb drive it was VERY slow and I finally had to just turn the computer off since it froze and I couldn’t log out. Hopefully that didn’t damage the thumb drive – I can always recreate it. I’m guessing that it was because of not actually being installed – which I am not ready to do. But I was encouraged to see it actually get an internet connection – this is the first distro that did that.

        More exploring needed for sure.

        • #344721 Reply

          anonymous

          ? says:

          have you verified the checksum?

          https://elementary.io/docs/installation#recommended-system-specifications

          see: verify your download section

          rebooting sometimes helps, too…

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #344724 Reply

            LHiggins
            AskWoody Plus

            Yes, I think that the laptop itself doesn’t have quite the specs it needs. And since the OS is not installed, but running from the thumb drive – that is probably causing an issue, too. I have a Core 2 Duo 5500 which I believe is significantly slower than the recommended i3. I also don’t have a SS hard drive, and only 3 GB ram, so I think that the laptop is just underpowered for Elementary. It looks nice though – maybe if I decide to also try it on my Win 7 laptop it may work better.

            I’ll go back to one of the Ubuntus and keep working at it.

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