• Security Update for Linux Distros

    Home » Forums » AskWoody support » Linux for the Home user » Linux – all distros » Security Update for Linux Distros

    • This topic has 135 replies, 9 voices, and was last updated 4 months ago by anonymous.
    Author
    Topic
    #2379017

    Well after reading this article over on Bleeping Computer I re-checked the Mint update manager and lo and behold, patches were waiting for systemd and initramfs (which were not there 10 minutes previous)

    Systemd:
    * SECURITY UPDATE: DoS via DHCP FORCERENEW
    – debian/patches/CVE-2020-13529.patch: tentatively ignore FORCERENEW
    command in src/libsystemd-network/sd-dhcp-client.c.
    – CVE-2020-13529
    * SECURITY UPDATE: denial of service via stack exhaustion
    – debian/patches/CVE-2021-33910.patch: do not use strdupa() on a path in src/basic/unit-name.c.
    – CVE-2021-33910

    from Linux Mint changelog

    Post install:
    Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 18:09:08 2021

    Upgraded the following packages:
    initramfs-tools (0.130ubuntu3.12) to 0.130ubuntu3.13
    initramfs-tools-bin (0.130ubuntu3.12) to 0.130ubuntu3.13
    initramfs-tools-core (0.130ubuntu3.12) to 0.130ubuntu3.13
    libnss-myhostname (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    libnss-systemd (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    libpam-systemd (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    libsystemd0 (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    libudev1 (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    systemd (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    systemd-coredump (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    systemd-sysv (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
    udev (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49

    Check your system updater ASAP 🙂

    5 users thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 72 reply threads
    Author
    Replies
    • #2379090

      ..and following that, received a new Kernel update: 4.15.0-147.151
      Then got hit with a blank screen on reboot (using LVM/LUKS)
      reported: lvm-mint missing!
      ok, hard reset then loaded grub bootloader to revert back to
      previous kernel booted up ok although the Mint logo at encryption screen was missing.
      Logged in ok and no errors in error log.
      tomorrow is another day 😉

      History log:

      history

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2379094

      Well, that’s pretty disappointing! I was all set to install the updates on my daily driver Mint 19.2 Cinnamon. Guess I’m going to wait a day or two… or more. Wish I had a better idea of just what an attacker needs to do to exploit the vulnerabilities.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379097

        Whatever it is on this system, seems to affect first stage encryption, the ‘lvm-mint missing’ will only be attributed to encrypted storage. EXT4 without encryption may/may not be ok, dunno yet. I’ll check for reports on the mint forums and echo back should others encounter issues. sigh

        edit: I’m gonna try a different kernel 5.4.0.80 and see what happens

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379099

        Changed kernels to 5.4.0.80 and the system booted fine, no errors in logs although the login screen is still missing the mint logo. I’ll be sticking with this and mask the suspend (to prevent the freeze on this systems hardware and kernel)
        As you stated, there doesn’t seem to be an explanation on how the exploit is accessed, yet. I’d rather close this potential than leave it open. YMMV

        54kernel

        I think I’ll have a look at my plymouth config tomorrow to see if there is anything there causing the disappearance/conflict of the mint logo..

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2379098

      I accepted all of the changes offered in KDE Plasma (based on Ubuntu 20.04 like recent versions of Mint), and it booted and works fine, including with my LUKS encrypted (Ext4) volume. I am using Ubuntu kernel 5.11 (from the HWE-Edge stack).

      You don’t need to wait a few days if you’re concerned about the issue Microfix had. It’s easy enough to select the old kernel if something goes wrong (also as Microfix did).

      Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
      XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2379107

      ? says:

      got this on 18.04 and 20.04 earlier today:

      Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 13:48:07 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      libnss-systemd 237-3ubuntu10.49
      libpam-systemd 237-3ubuntu10.49
      libsystemd0 237-3ubuntu10.49
      libudev1 237-3ubuntu10.49
      systemd 237-3ubuntu10.49
      systemd-sysv 237-3ubuntu10.49
      udev 237-3ubuntu10.49

      then just got this:

      Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 16:55:51 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic 4.15.0.151.139
      linux-headers-generic 4.15.0.151.139
      linux-image-generic 4.15.0.151.139
      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-4.15.0-151
      linux-headers-4.15.0-151-generic )
      linux-image-4.15.0-151-generic
      linux-modules-4.15.0-151-generic
      linux-modules-extra-4.15.0-151-generic

      kernel is on the 18.04, seems to be working ok.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2379121

      ? says:

      and this on 20.04’s:

      Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 17:58:08 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45

      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04  5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45
      linux-libc-dev 5.4.0-80.90

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.8-headers-5.8.0-63 (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)

       

    • #2379156

      Microfix, which of the updates do you think is causing the problem? Systemd, Initramfs-tools, the first new kernel, or a combination of all?  I’m so glad I checked back here before installing these two updates.

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by Charlie.
      • #2379178

        Charlie, I think it may be my configuration and/or hardware dependant.
        If I was in your shoes, I’d update ASAP given the nature of the updates.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2379176

      For what it’s worth I just installed the systemd, initramfs-tools, and kernel 4.15.0-151.157 patches on a 2009 HP Pavilion laptop with AMD Athlon processor and ATI Radeon graphics. They were installed one at a time in the order given above with a shutdown and start after each one, even though the only one that required a restart was the kernel. There is no encryption, just a standard single boot Mint Cinnamon 19.2 installation.

      Everything seems completely normal and functioning. Absolutely nothing odd/unusual happened.

      6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379270

        I’m going to try this method, first on our newly-set-up laptop.  If that works out, I’ll do the desktop.  Now with two working computers in the house, I can look for help on one if I go wrong with the other.

        Edit:  In the laptop, same OS, no updates are currently offered and none are found using Update Manager.  Will let this fester for a while and see what if anything changes.

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

    • #2379177

      On bootup today with the 5.4.0.80 kernel the system booted fine, as was prior to update – go figure..

      So, tried 4.15.0-147.151 kernel again, same result as yesterday groan
      xsession error log displayed:

      ** (mate-settings-daemon:1558): CRITICAL **: 08:53:59.287: setup_background: assertion ‘p->bg == NULL’ failed

      Next: edited grub to disable plymouth theme, same result.

      I’m just gonna stick with 5.4.0.80 and wait for the next 4.15.0 xxx.xxx kernel to be released. Masked Hiber/standby as a precaution to clicking it by accident. IOW a long standing issue on this device with the 5.4 xxx kernel, which is why I prefer the 4.15 xxx.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379199

        UPDATE: Whilst on kernel 5.4.0.80, I did some more digging around and could not find anything obvious. Then I thought, might just re-enforce plymouth settings to see if that corrects anything, as the freeze and issues are all pre-OS login.

        So applied the following to the terminal:

        sudo update-alternatives --config default.plymouth

        selected default 0 then tried an older method of enforcing:

        sudo update-initramfs -u

        Grub updated using:

        sudo update-grub

        and rebooted.

        During reboot I accessed grub (left shift key held down during boot)
        and then loaded kernel 4.15.0-147.151…….
        ..black screen for ages then,
        YEAH! everything worked as intended!

        This must have been a plymouth glitch for this system as the netbook was fine with the 4.15.xx kernel upgrade earlier today.

        False+ then, update all good folks, better to be safe than sorry. Go get ’em

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379328

        I’m just gonna stick with 5.4.0.80 and wait for the next 4.15.0 xxx.xxx kernel to be released. Masked Hiber/standby as a precaution to clicking it by accident. IOW a long standing issue on this device with the 5.4 xxx kernel, which is why I prefer the 4.15 xxx.

        Have you considered a newer kernel, to see if whatever issue is in 5.4 has been fixed?

        The Ubuntu repo for 20.04 has the 5.8 kernel (HWE stack), 5.11 kernel (HWE-Edge stack), and as I discovered just today, the 5.13 kernel (OEM stack). I just installed 5.13 OEM into my Dell G3 laptop, and I am about to do it on my Dell XPS 13 also (which actually came with the Ubuntu OEM kernel from the factory).

        If your Mint uses 4.15 by default, it sounds like it is a Bionic-based release, so I don’t know what the repo holds in that case. I would guess the OEM one would be available at least.

        You might even want to try suspend again on the latest version of 5.4, in case they finally ported the fix for the issue to that version (if there is one), if you haven’t already.

         

        Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
        XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2379438

          Yeah, whilst on 5.4 kernel earlier, the suspend issue is still there. Also on the 5.13 kernel on Solus Mate 4.3, so sticking with what works here until 2023 or a parts donor device.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2379192

      Been running Mint going on 3 years now, and one of the pleasant surprises has been the problem-free updating procedure- unlike W7 and 10, almost a non-event.  On rare occasions, there has been a message, “could not install updates”, but no repercussions, and all went fine afterwards.

      As a non-tech, the previous posts in this thread are above my pay grade, but I’m concluding that, going forward, I should be more cautious installing updates.  Our computers run Mate 19.2, no encryption.  Can someone suggest a strategy re updating that may help us avoid a problem that I can’t overcome?

      Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379200

        FWIW, I have two VMs running Mint.  One running Mint 20.2 with Cinnamon and the other running Mint 20.1 with Mate.  Both installed the most recent batch of updates without a hitch.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379201

        See my post above (grub access during boot) to revert to a previous kernel should something go south.

        no strategy required slowpoke47, just do it, that’s windows stinkin’ thinkin’ 🙂

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2379418

      I did my updates last night (Systemd, & Initramfs-tools) and restarted after each install.  All went well.  I didn’t do the Kernel update though, I’m still at 4-15.0.139.

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379429

        If your happy with it, that’s cool, however, have you read the Changelogs/CVE Tracker links on superseded kernels higher than 4-15.0.139?

        You’ll find these within Mint-Updater: Menubar> View> Linux Kernels

        IMHO you should update to the newest kernel version, we are here to help.
        Let the update do it’s thing and follow instructions.
        Reboot once the new kernel is updated..I’ve been doing that since forever on desktops/laptops using synaptic package manager on different distros before mint-updater on LM.

        • #2379563

          If your happy with it, that’s cool, however, have you read the Changelogs/CVE Tracker links on superseded kernels higher than 4-15.0.139?

          Yes I have, and I also read the “Bug Report” that is in there with that group. I don’t install a new kernel if it has Bugs.  4-15.0.139 had no bugs for quite a while so I stuck with it since the newer kernels did have more bugs.

          Maybe I’m worrying about something that’s not that important, but some of those Bugs can look ominous.

          Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

    • #2379434

      ? says:

      and the latest:

      Commit Log for Thu Jul 22 13:48:27 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      libnss-systemd to 237-3ubuntu10.50
      libpam-systemd 237-3ubuntu10.50
      libsystemd0 to 237-3ubuntu10.50
      libudev1 to 237-3ubuntu10.50
      systemd to 237-3ubuntu10.50
      systemd-sysv to 237-3ubuntu10.50
      udev to 237-3ubuntu10.50

      at least they are on a fix within two days.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2379617

      Here’s an update with some results I’m not sure what to make of.

      As I posted above I installed all the updates – systemd, initramfs, and 4.15.0-151 kernel – on an Hp Pavilion laptop. All was well and continues to be well.

      Installed the same updates on a Gateway Netbook. Everything seemed fine. Successful reboot and everything working. Set the computer aside for a couple hours and booted it up again only to have it freeze on a black screen with a non-blinking cursor at the upper left; it did not even get to he password login. I forced a shutdown and booted with the old 4.15.0-147 kernel; the boot was successful and everything worked. I shut down normally, the booted with the new 4.15.0-151 kernel and everything worked. I’ve shut down and started (cold starts, not restarts) 5 times since, all with the new kernel and each time everything has been fine. I’m thinking I might not have waited long enough on the frozen black screen, or that it was just a glitch – this computer has a history of infrequently booting without a wireless connection or with something a bit funky in the lower right system tray, such as a missing Update Manager icon, or a screen brightness icon substituted for the battery charging icon. In these cases a reboot fixes the wireless connection and would also fix the funky icons although in the latter cases I don’t typically reboot since everything else is just fine and in any case, these situations are quite rare. In any case all seems well.

      Moving on to an old Acer Aspire laptop, I installed the same updates as above, did the required reboot, and all seemed well. Then I tried to create a system snapshot in Timeshift. It started just fine so I left the computer for about 20 minutes, and came back to find that no snapshot had actually been created. I tried to create a snapshot again but got a window that said something like “snapshot created, can’t create snapshot”. The window flashed by so even after about 5 tries I’m not sure of exactly the right wording. I messed a bit with the scheduling of snapshots, but nothing worked. I shut the computer down, and then started it. It will not boot under any circumstances with either the new kernel or the old kernel. No matter which of those 2 kernels I pick (they are the only 2 I’ve tried), and whether it’s a normal or safe mode boot, I never even get to a login, but always end up with a black screen with “initramfs” and a blinking cursor preceded by a statement to type help for a list of commands. When I try to boot in safe mode I get a bunch of messages scrolling on the screen, ending with something to the effect of root file system failure.

      I have no idea what to do here other than perhaps to try to reinstall Mint 19.2. It seems that since there was a problem creating a snapshot, perhaps the issue is not caused by any of the systemd, initramfs, or kernel patches, particularly in light of the fact that the computer did successfully boot after installing those patches. On the other hand it seems a bit coincidental that I get a black screen with initramfs showing. I’m thinking, or perhaps hoping, that the issue is a hard drive failure rather than due to patching.

      All of this was to be preliminary testing for my daily driver. I’m a bit hesitant to update it now given the Acer failure. I’d welcome any comments/suggestions from folks, particularly regarding whether or not the Acer failure is due to installation of the three patches.

      One other tidbit FWIW: my daily driver is a Dell Inspiron from 2016. The other 3 computers mentioned above are all from 2009.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2381525

        Sorry it took so long for the reply, but perhaps this article will help, if you are still having the issue.

        Edit: Never mind, just saw the followup messages. Glad it seems to be working!

        Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
        XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2381640

          Thanks for the article. The method described is what I ended up doing. Any
          idea why I have to invoke that method more than once? I’ll do it and things will seem fine for a while (perhaps a day or so). Then all of a sudden my machine freezes or freezes with black screen or can’t mount a usb flash drive, I’ll force a shutdown and when I start back up I have to go through the same procedure again.

          Also, as one of our Linux experts, after reading through this topic do have any insight as to what is causing the problems described here? Do you think it’s the kernel upgrade to 4.14.0-151 or the systemd or initramfs updates, or something else?

          I find all this fairly disappointing since Mint has, up until now, been rock solid for me on all 4 of my installations, and I really didn’t give updating a second thought since it’s always been extremely reliable.

          • #2381881

            Also, as one of our Linux experts, after reading through this topic do have any insight as to what is causing the problems described here? Do you think it’s the kernel upgrade to 4.14.0-151 or the systemd or initramfs updates, or something else?

            fsck is short for ‘filesystem check’, the equivalent of Windows’ chkdisk. If it is repeatedly getting messed up, look to the disk in question (it should have told you which it was, if you have more than one). If it’s hanging where you have to force it off, that could possibly make this happen. It could also be that a disk is failing. It could also be a bug somewhere.

            I would use the GNOME disks tool (called ‘disks’ in Mint… it is installed by default) and check the SMART stats on the drive and see if there is anything unusual in there (bad blocks, uncorrectable errors, growing number of bad sectors, that kind of thing).

            It’s been a long time since I’ve had this happen, so I don’t have much information (I have to puzzle things out myself to learn how to fix it!).

            Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
            XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2381905

              Nothing seems unusual. Every SMART attribute is assessed as OK, as is the overall hard drive, and the self test was successfully passed.

              After reading the following two pages I really think it’s a kernel bug.
              (I’ve also posted these links below.)

              https://www.ubuntuupdates.org/package/core/bionic/main/security/linux-headers-4.15.0-153-generic

              https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1938013

            • #2382088

              Would you be willing to move to a newer one? Mint makes that really easy, using the Kernels menu item. It could be that older kernels are not getting the attention the newer ones are.

              Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
              XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, Kubuntu 22.04, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

            • #2382116

              I’m assuming you mean a ‘5’ series kernel? I’d consider moving to that if the latest 4.15 kernel doesn’t fix things.

              I’d like to stay with what I’ve basically got now since up until the present everything about my Mint installations has been rock solid – far better than Windows and somewhat better than macOS.

    • #2379639

      The Gateway Netbook: given my device similar recent experience at the top of this thread, I think it’s attributed to plymouth and the initramfs update. It may be a glitch but, enforcing plymouth settings worked here, and is still working flawlessly.

      Acer Aspire Laptop: personally, I don’t use or have timeshift installed so can’t comment. Although you COULD try uninstalling timeshift, remove ~.config and ~.local hidden files attributed to timeshift from within your Home folder and then reinstall it (aka fresh installation), then reconfigure to your needs and see if that clears up the issue.
      Re-installing Linux Mint is a last resort and overly dramatic IMHO

      FYI: Only just got an update for mint-mirrors 1.2.1, wonder if ther has been a problem there or certs expired on mirrors?

      ***************************************
      EVERYONE USING LINUX MINT
      Just checked software sources within mint-updater and noticed some mirrors have dropped off. It would be wise to check your own system once this mint-mirror update is installed to update the mirrors listings.
      ***************************************

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379649

        The Gateway has been working fine ever since the one failed boot. I was describing what happened in case anyone else experienced the same thing.

        The problem with the Acer is that it just won’t boot! So, I can’t do anything to or with it. The only info I get when I try booting in safe mode is that the root file system failed. I don’t particularly care about Timeshift one way or another, but I thought perhaps it’s sudden inability to make a snapshot might be related to the computer’s failure to boot, or that it might suggest to someone a particular issue/problem.

        I just updated my daily driver and pretty much the same thing happened as happened with the Gateway. The installation went fine, as did the shutdown and subsequent start, and everything seemed to work fine. Then I sut down and started again after a few minutes. I got as far as the login request for password but it said it didn’t recognize something and couldn’t log me in. Somewhat ironically, though, it had a button that said “logout”. Since that was my only option, I clicked it and got a black screen with a blinking cursor at the upper left. I waited a few minutes and then forced a shutdown. I started the computer a couple minutes later with the new kernel and everything worked fine. I’ve since shutdown and started 5 times and it works flawlessly.

        So, anyway, 3 of my 4 Mint computers have updated successfully, although 2 of them had a minor glitch on the second start after installation. The fourth computer updated and booted once successfully but then something else has prevented it from booting. My guess is that it doesn’t have anything to do with updating, but rather a corrupted/bad or failing hard drive.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2379651

          regarding the device that won’t boot;
          Load from the ‘live’ media (usb or otherwise) and using the tools within may be able to help establish what the issue is. And whilst there, access your device storage and see if log files show anything concerning failures.
          Although a separate topic for this issue would assist 🙂

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2381155

          Here’s a quick update on the Acer laptop that wouldn’t boot. It is NOT because of a bad hard drive, but I do think it’s a problem resulting from one of the the three updates: systemd, initramfs, or the new kernel 4.15.0-151, and most likely initramfs.

          My problem is exactly as stated in the first shaded box here:
          https://askubuntu.com/questions/137655/boot-drops-to-a-initramfs-prompts-busybox/817660#817660

          You can read through the solution replies but basically what I did was to enter ‘exit’ after the (initramfs). This gave me the location of the corrupted part of my file system (‘/dev/sda1/’) Then after the next (initramfs) I entered ‘fsck /dev/sda1/ -y’ Don’t use the apostrophies. You should see a bunch of ‘FIXED’ notations and then get yet another (initramfs). I then entered ‘exit’ which resulted in a black screen (easily solvable with a forced shutdown and then a start, after which I got a nice clean boot), but probably should have entered ‘reboot’. I’ve just finished starting and shutting down a couple times and all seems well. I’ll report back if anything heads south.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2379688

      More funky stuff to report regarding my daily driver that I mentioned 2 posts up (#2379649).

      As I reported, it seemed OK after after the second boot after updating failed, with 5 subsequent boots all OK. I left the computer on for about 8 hours without using it and when I came back to it it was black screen and totally unresponsive. It was apparently on because it did respond to a forced shutdown. I started it and it took a bit longer than normal to get to the login screen. After entering my password it hesitated for about 10 seconds, then went black with the cursor arrow in the middle of the screen, at which point it just sat there for 5 minutes. I forced a shutdown and then started it (with the new kernel 4.15.0-151) and everything seems fine, once again.

      There’s some funky stuff going on with these updates. Pretty disappointing!

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2379813

      Been a Mint user for about 3 years now, and this is the first serious update glitch I have encountered.  Much of this thread discussion is over my head, so I don’t know what the best strategy is regarding these updates.  Would the Mint coders be expected to put out corrected versions?  And if so, how do we at the receiving end know when that has happened?

      Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2379928

      This same issue is under discussion on the Mint forum.  This is one suggestion posted there, but it doesn’t address the problem of what to do if those updates cause trouble.

      Somebody with Timeshift running should install all but the 3 shown below.
      Then take a snapshot.
      Then install these 3 one at a time in this order, with a snapshot between each one (2 more snapshots).

      • initramfs-tools
      • systemd
      • Kernel

      If no problems are encountered, then all is good. That is my thinking.

      https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?p=2044878#top

      Moderator Note: Please use the “Text” tab in the entry box when you copy/paste to avoid adding extraneous HTML.

      Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2380039

        This is why I read the Bug Report on all Kernel updates (as stated above in report #2379563) found under – view – Kernels in Linux Mint’s Update Manager.

        Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2381128

      I’m seeing a new Systemd security update in my Linux Mint Update Manager.  I’ve done all the other security updates and a couple software updates with no problem but am holding off on the new Systemd.  Anyone have any comment?

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2381143

        Can you clarify what you mean by “new”. I installed a systemd update on July 24. The old version (the one I replaced) was 237-3ubuntu10.48 and the new one (the one I installed on July 27 was 237-3ubuntu10.50. I’m seeing these versions in the View/History of Updates menu of the Update Manager. I just checked my Update Manager and I’m not being offered any other systemd updates.

        Just curious – have you installed the 4.15.0-151 kernel? and how about the initramfs (probably version 0.130ubuntu3.13)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2381399

          The old Systemd update is 237-3ubuntu10.49 (the last update I did).  The new Systemd is 237-3ubuntu10.50.  I did do the initramfs update, but haven’t done the latest kernel update yet.

          Linux Mint 19.1

          Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

    • #2381257

      I’ve held off on any updating, waiting for others’ resolutions via this thread.  Currently offered 14 updates, see s/shots.  Looking for advice on which if any to install…Updates

      Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

    • #2381422

      @Charlie and Slowpoke47: In my opinion the ones to be careful with are systemd, initramfs, and the 4.15.0-151 kernel. All the troubles I’ve had came from these three, although I can’t say which troubles came which of the three.

      I’ve described what I did to resolve my problems. None of it is particularly hard to do, although if you’ve never done it you’ll perhaps be apprehensive. (In some ways the uncertainty and apprehensiveness is the hardest part – I speak from experience!).

      In Update Manager, View/Linux Kernels gives me an initial warning screen with instructions for reverting to a previous kernel. Those instructions work well, and combined with forced shutdowns (on laptops press and hold the power button for about 5 seconds until the machine shuts down; this works on some desktops, too, although on some desktops you literally have to unplug the machine)) got me out of almost all my troubles. The one exception was on my Acer laptop that wouldn’t boot but kept giving me (initramfs) with the expectation I would enter a command after that. I described above how I dealt with that problem.

      Depending on how adventurous you feel, I’d either go for it or I’d wait for the next systemd, initramfs, and kernel updates. I know there are some security holes in those three but I would think if you visit reputable websites and don’t click on ads or email links, you’ll be safe.

      That’s my opinion. Hopefully some of our Linux experts will offer their point of view, also.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2381460

      ? says:

      please don’t be afraid of security patches. i suggest synaptic package manager. you can set it to show only security and just install those which is how i use it. one of my machines went to initramfs code 4 on the file system after the dog knocked on the usb stick containing the os while chasing the energetic tennis ball. at the initramfs prompt i typed “exit” and it re-ran the built-in troubleshooter telling me to run fsck to fix the corrupted file system. so, i asked it to run fsck -yf /dev/sda1 and watched it do it’s magic. presto changeo back in business. definitely not rocket science…

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2381464

        Yes, that’s what happened to my Acer laptop. The fsck command I used was a bit different than yours (I used fsck /dev/sda1/ -y), but apparently did the same thing.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2381480

      I need to correct my command. I stated above that I used fsck /dev/sda1/ -y, but I used
      fsck /dev/sda1 -y. In other words remove the last ‘/’ in my original command.

      I discovered this when my daily driver suddenly froze and would not reboot after I forced a shutdown. So I forced another shutdown, started the machine and ended up with (initramfs). In other words same thing as happened on my Acer laptop. All seems fine now.

      Nothing bad will happen if you include the last ‘/’, you’ll just get a message that there is no such command.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2381604

      I think I’ll take this opportunity to mention this here and now because it just started after I did the last update which included Systemd and initramfs.  My Sony laptop’s screen started to flicker and then went black completely. Shining a flashlight on the screen showed everything was up on the screen but apparently the backlight was out. After fooling around thinking my backlight had gone kaput, I closed everything and restarted the computer.

      Now the screen was lit up again! But after a few minutes it flickered and went out again.  I noticed this time when I closed the screen down all the way, the hard drive light flickered. So I raised the screen and it was lit again. In only a minute or so it went out again.

      Long story short, I finally found that putting the computer in sleep and then waking it up again made the screen stay on with no flickers or outages.  But this only works for that session. The next time I booted the computer up I was faced with the same problem, had to put in sleep mode, and then wake it up again. Then it’s okay for that session.

      Is there any possibility that one of those recent updates might be causing this weird behavior?  Any info. will be much appreciated.

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2381606

      ? says:

      Charlie, when i have a question about a “recent update,” causing problems i boot to a known good kernel and see if the same problems are occuring.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2381621

      @Charlie – Good idea about shining a flashlight on the screen. After installing these updates I’ve had a few instances of a black screen after letting the computer sit for a while.

      It’s hard to say but I think the updates have something to do with your issue. Trying to boot with a previous known good kernel might help to decide if the issue is with the kernel, but I’m not sure it will help much deciding if the systemd and/or initramfs updates are at fault. Worth a try, though.

      I’m still getting intermittent funky behavior on my Dell Inspiron daily driver. I mentioned the black screen above, but I’ve also encountered issues mounting a usb flash drive. I shut down and when I started up I yet again got the (initramfs) prompt after which I entered “exit” and then an fsck command and then a reboot command. After which things seemed fine again. But it’s strange that I’ve had to do the (initramfs) thing twice on my daily driver and also twice on an old Acer laptop. I would have thought repairing the file system once would be enough. It seems that perhaps one of the updates keeps corrupting the file system.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2381836

        I could kick myself for not doing a Timeshift backup before running a kernel update (Systemd is a red #4 Kernel Update).  But I’m not sure if TimeShift works on kernel updates.  I’ve got lots of chores to do today, but I’ll get back to you when I have something more to report on this situation.

        Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      • #2381867

        There’s a new kernel out that supposedly addresses the fact that some CPUs were being frozen by 4.15.0-151. See the first entry under changelog here:

        https://www.ubuntuupdates.org/package/core/bionic/main/security/linux-headers-4.15.0-153-generic

        I’m being offered this new kernel but I’m sitting tight for a while until I can find more info about it.

        Edit to add: Here’s some more info. I don’t understand the technical stuff, but reading through the text comments, a lot of it sounds just like the stuff that’s been happening to 2 of my computers since installing the 4.15.0-151 kernel. This would tend to lend credence to booting with the old 4.15.0-147 kernel. I haven’t done that yet (I’m either too stupid or too stubborn trying to make the .151 kernel work!)

        https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1938013

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2381797

      ? says:

      just in:

      Commit Log for Wed Aug  4 10:46:09 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45) to 5.11.0.25.27~20.04.10
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45) to 5.11.0.25.27~20.04.10
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45) to 5.11.0.25.27~20.04.10

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.11-headers-5.11.0-25 (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)

      boots and runs as always

    • #2381981

      Following this thread with trepidation- with more experienced Mint users having problems with these updates, I’m afraid to make a move.  If the developers see problems arising with these updates, and revise them, would you expect the revisions to have different numbers, and would we then just ignore the originals, or would the originals disappear from the list of offered updates?

      Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

      • #2382065

        Of the three updates that seem to be problematic – systemd, initramfs, and kernel 4.15.0-151 – I’ve only seen one subsequent new update and that’s for a kernel which is now up to 4.15.0-153. In my Update Manager I see the new kernel offered with 4.15.0-151 listed as the old version and 4.15.0-153 listed as the new version. Also, when I go to View/Linux Kernels, I see 4.15.151 as active, 4.15.0-147 right below that as installed and 4.15.0-153 at the very top with neither ‘active’ nor installed’ listed because I haven’t installed it yet.

        I’m guessing that when you look at Update Manager you see the new kernel update with 4.15.0-153 listed as the new version and 4.15.0-147 as the old version, and that that’s the only kernel update you see, and that means you should be able to go directly from the 147 kernel to the 153 kernel. I believe an analogous sort of thing will happen with systemd and initramfs. You can check for updates for these 2 (as well as kernels) here:

        https://ubuntu.com/security/notices

        But be aware that the list in the above link may not always match up with what you’re being offered. For example I don’t see the newest kernel in the above link, perhaps because they just haven’t added it yet or perhaps because it’s fixing a bug rather than a security vulnerability and therefore isn’t considered a security update.

        At the moment the only issue I’m having is an occasional freeze (I did have to go through some command line stuff twice that I described above to fix a corrupted file system, but that was actually pretty easy and doesn’t seem to be an issue anymore). So I’m not pulling the trigger yet on the 153 kernel because the freeze is easy to deal with and because I haven’t found a changelog for the 153 kernel yet.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2382095

      There’s a typo above. The 5.15.0-153 should be 4.15.0-153.

      Thanks to Ascaris for catching that!

    • #2382122

      ? says;

      picked up the kernel security patch on ubuntu 18.04 lts, yesterday:

      Commit Log for Wed Aug  4 09:14:29 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic (4.15.0.151.139) to 4.15.0.153.142
      linux-image-generic (4.15.0.151.139) to 4.15.0.153.142
      Installed the following packages:
      linux-image-4.15.0-153-generic (4.15.0-153.160)
      still running as expected.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2382128

      Well to my surprise today I turned on my Sony VGN-NR285E with Linux Mint 19.1 and it booted up and the screen has stayed on for more than 45 minutes now without even a flicker.  Naturally I’m happy about this but as they say – go figure.  Hopefully whatever was going on cleared itself up.  Time will tell but I’m hoping there isn’t anymore screen problem.

      Edit: I haven’t done anything more than what I’ve described above, so I can’t take any credit and have nothing more to offer or report other than I’m still running the 49 version of Systemd (have not gone to the 50 version).

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Charlie.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2382167

      Up to date with no irregularities here on 4.15.0-153 kernel on LM Mate 19.3

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2382173

      I just installed 4.15.0-153 on a test machine. Seems fine so far after 2 boots. But I’m reserving judgement since my troubles with 4.15.0-151 didn’t start until the 2nd boot or later (depending on the computer).

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2382360

      I have now completely updated 3 of my 4 Mint 19.2 Cinnamon computers. I have shut down and then started (from a power off state) each of them 4 times, each time testing the internet connection/browsers (Opera and Firefox), and opening a variety of file types (jpeg, png, midi,mp3, pdf, text). I’ve also viewed ‘logs’ and opened ‘disks’ to check hard drive condition. As near as I can tell all 3 computers are running as they were before the patch fiasco. In other words they’re running fine as they should.

      Next step is to let each computer sit for 24 hours (there was roughly a 30 to 60 minute wait between the starts described above) and then start. That might sound stupid but I had noticed that a bad boot sometimes followed a good one after sitting for roughly a day.

      I haven’t done anything with my daily driver yet, although I’ve continued to use it as I normally do. It’s settled down and typically freezes once every 24 to 48 hours. A forced shutdown and a start and I’m right back up and running.

      I’ll report back later with more results.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2382467

      The 3 machines other than my daily driver have all sat for more than 24 hours and then started up and ran fine.

      I updated my daily driver and have started it up twice. It’s been running for over 12 hours now with no freeze. All seems fine. It appears that things are back to normal on all my Mint installations.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2382468

        Thanks for being the test pilot!  Just updated our laptop with just the most recent kernel update, seems to be fine after restarts, etc.  Both machines are being offered 17 or 18 updates in all, including the systemd and initramfs that you referenced above as being possible trouble.

        Am I correct to understand that you installed these two as well, no repercussions as yet?

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

      • #2382472

        DrB, did you do install the “new” Systemd 237-3ubuntu10.50 too?

        Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      • #2382519

        @Charlie and @Slowpoke47 I am fully updated on all my Mint computers. The Update Manager says I’m up to date and is not offering me anything.

        I’ve installed the systemd 237-3ubuntu10.50 and the initramfs0.130ubuntu3.13 on all my computers.

        I’m pretty sure that if you get the new kernel (153) installed you’ll be fine, especially if you’re going from the 147 kernel. I think most if not all of my problems came from the buggy 151 kernel. I’ve described all the problems I ran into above. The only thing I would add is that rarely when I tried to boot after a forced shutdown the boot would hang on a black screen or black screen with cursor arrow. I just forced a shutdown from the hang, started up again and it would work. But that was with the 151 kernel.

        FWIW my daily driver has been up for 16 hours now with no freeze. I’m going to leave it running for maybe 48 to 60 hours to see how it goes.

        Let us know how things turn out. I’ll do what I can to help if you need it.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2382603

          My strategy, implemented yesterday, was to test the updates on our newly acquired HP laptop, into which I installed Mint, and which has no files in it.  I installed only the 153 kernel.  If it went wrong, I reasoned I could reinstall Mint from the same stick originally used and rescue the situation.

          The install worked out well, and several reboots went drama-free.  Today I plan to install all the remaining 17 updates offered in the laptop, and if that looks good, I’ll do the desktop.  Report to follow.

          Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

    • #2382949

      I’m at 60 straight hours of uptime on my daily driver. No freezes or any other odd behavior. I’d say things are back to normal.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2382992

        Good to hear.  Updated our laptop a couple of days ago, several boot cycles since then, all seems well here also.  I plan to do the desktop tomorrow- used the laptop as the guinea pig because, being a brand new installation, there are no docs stored yet that might have been lost if the updates had caused a problem leading me to re-install the OS.

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2382999

          I’d be willing to bet the desktop will go well, too.

          Much as I disliked Mint going south I will admit to a good feeling of having finally beaten it into submission (thanks to all here who helped).

          I will still take Mint over Windows and probably over macOS, as well.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2383093

            Just completed updating this desktop.  It was a typical Mint non-event and the reboot was without drama.

            One of the pleasant surprises when switching to Mint 3 years back was the ease of updating, unlike our former W7 in which it was often a roll of the dice.  I usually delayed until Sue Bradley gave the green light.

            This has been my first time seeing a Mint update problem.  How common has this been in Mint?

             

            Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2383095

              Not very common.  A couple of problems I had could not be traced back to the result of an update.  I use TimeShift to make a restore point before doing updates just in case though (as long as I remember to do it).

              My old Sony laptop doesn’t have Bluetooth so I don’t bother with any updates for it.  I like being able to have control over what updates I want which is something one doesn’t have with MS Windows anymore.

              Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2383126

              This is the first problem I’ve had with it and I’ve been running 19.2 since it came out on as many as 4 different computers. Up until now it’s been rock solid and the patches go in quickly and without incident or drama; none of this hour long stuff where you can’t tell if your machine is hanging or not. Usually 5 minutes start to finish for a week’s worth of patches with another minute or two if a restart is required. Even on an initial setup where there might be 150 patches, it only takes about 0.5 hour.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2384432

      Just installed Mint kernel update 4.15.0-154.161 including restart without drama on 2 machines.  Apparently good to go.

      Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2384666

      ? says:

      humm, Slowpoke47. i received\installed v 4.15.0-154.143 on Tuesday the 17th. maybe your .161 is mint specific? anyway latest version seems to do it’s job as usual. also installed 5.11.0.27 on ubuntu 20.04 lts on Tuesday as well, no quirks there, either…

      • #2384683

        If you look here: https://ubuntu.com/security/notices and click on links under the latest Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities entries you’ll see a variety of kernel versions being offered depending on specific platforms. One version is the .143 that you mentioned and one is the .161 version that Slowpoke47 refers to. There are others listed as well. I’m on Mint 19.2 Cinnamon and am being offered the .161 version although I haven’t installed it yet.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2384697

      ? says:

      thanks, good DrB, i quit using the link you posted because of the “Tracker Settings, ” fence they erected a year or more ago. i went back and looked at my synaptics package manager history and found that my kernel image is .143, linux-generic (4.15.0.153.142) to 4.15.0.154.143 and the headers are .161, linux-headers-4.15.0-154 (4.15.0-154.161), so i’m guessing it is the same sauce…

      Commit Log for Tue Aug 17 10:19:28 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic (4.15.0.153.142) to 4.15.0.154.143
      linux-headers-generic (4.15.0.153.142) to 4.15.0.154.143
      linux-image-generic (4.15.0.153.142) to 4.15.0.154.143

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-4.15.0-154 (4.15.0-154.161)
      linux-headers-4.15.0-154-generic (4.15.0-154.161)
      linux-image-4.15.0-154-generic (4.15.0-154.161)
      linux-modules-4.15.0-154-generic (4.15.0-154.161)
      linux-modules-extra-4.15.0-154-generic (4.15.0-154.161)

       

    • #2384937

      Now I see yet another Systemd update 51.  I just did the Systemd 50 a few days ago.  I suppose there’s no reason to worry about this, but I do.

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      • #2384943

        50 is actually fairly old; I installed it on 7/24/2021.

        I’ve just now finished installing 51 on three Mint 19.2 Cinnamon machines and all seems well.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2384951

          I installed it too and all seems fine.  This time it was described as a Software update rather than a Kernel update.

          Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2384979

      Just updated my daily driver with all patches offered to me in the last week (including the latest systemd. All seems well. That makes 4 Mint 19.2 Cinnamon machines all completely updated and all seeming fine. It appears as though the recent kernel fiasco is history and things are back to rock solid normal.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2386246
    • #2388482

      ? says:

      …and if you use kernel 4.15 the new security version is now:

      Commit Log for Tue Sep  7 19:41:34 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic (4.15.0.154.143) to 4.15.0.156.145
      linux-headers-generic (4.15.0.154.143) to 4.15.0.156.145
      linux-image-generic (4.15.0.154.143) to 4.15.0.156.145
      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-4.15.0-156 (4.15.0-156.163)
      linux-headers-4.15.0-156-generic (4.15.0-156.163)
      linux-image-4.15.0-156-generic (4.15.0-156.163)
      linux-modules-4.15.0-156-generic (4.15.0-156.163)
      linux-modules-extra-4.15.0-156-generic (4.15.0-156.163) enjoy!

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2388472

      ? says:

      if interested there’s a new “security,” kernel in town:

      Commit Log for Tue Sep  7 17:51:53 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.27.29~20.04.11) to 5.11.0.34.36~20.04.13
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.27.29~20.04.11) to 5.11.0.34.36~20.04.13
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.27.29~20.04.11) to 5.11.0.34.36~20.04.13
      linux-libc-dev (5.4.0-81.91) to 5.4.0-84.94

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.11.0-34-generic (5.11.0-34.36~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.11-headers-5.11.0-34 (5.11.0-34.36~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.11.0-34-generic (5.11.0-34.36~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.11.0-34-generic (5.11.0-34.36~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.11.0-34-generic (5.11.0-34.36~20.04.1)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2392341

      Commit Log for Tue Sep 28 18:00 2021

      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic (4.15.0.158.147) to 4.15.0.159.148
      linux-headers-generic (4.15.0.158.147) to 4.15.0.159.148
      linux-image-generic (4.15.0.158.147) to 4.15.0.159.148
      linux-libc-dev (4.15.0-158.166) to 4.15.0-159.167

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-4.15.0-159 (4.15.0-159.167)
      linux-headers-4.15.0-159-generic (4.15.0-159.167)
      linux-image-4.15.0-159-generic (4.15.0-159.167)
      linux-modules-4.15.0-159-generic (4.15.0-159.167)
      linux-modules-extra-4.15.0-159-generic (4.15.0-159.167)

      all’s well here, no glitches whatsoever…SLICK 🙂

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2396749

      New kernel update for 19.x Minters

      Updated from:
      Linux 4.15.0-159 #148-Ubuntu SMP x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
      to:
      Linux 4.15.0-161 #169-Ubuntu SMP x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
      Changelog

      CVE-2021-40490 ext4: fix race writing to an inline_data file while its xattrs are changing.

      Happy to report, no problems thereafter 🙂

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2397516

        Just installed the latest kernel (4.15.0-161) on three Mint 19.2 machines. In addition to the required restart, each was shutdown and then started one more time. All is well.

        I do an extra shutdown/start cycle because the bad kernel that came out last July didn’t cause trouble until after the second start.

      • #2397563

        I’ve got 4.15.0-159 installed and running now on my Linux Mint 19.1.  Is there any really good reasons (like security) for updating to Kernel 4.15.0-161 right now?  I mostly don’t understand what those Changelogs are talking about.

        Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

        • #2397577

          FWIW here’s some more details. There are some security issues that are fixed. How severe they are or how likely it is that they’ll be exploited is not clear to me. But with the exception of the bad kernel from July I’ve not had any kernel problems in the 4 years I’ve been running Ubuntu/Mint.

          https://ubuntu.com/security/notices/USN-5114-1

          3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2397724

      I’ve had to avoid the latest 5.11 Kernel(HWE) Update that came from the Ubuntu Base(I’m on Linux Mint 20.1) on an ASUS TUF laptop(FX505DY-WH51) as the Realtek driver is broken by that Kernel update. Am I missing some needed security hardening there?

      linux-meta-hwe-5.11 (5.11.0.38.42~20.04.17) focal; urgency=medium Kernel.

      RTL8821CE 802.11ac WiFi broken with this kernel and I’ve tried the Laptop(ASUS Tuf FX505DY-WH51) with Secure Boot Enabled and Disabled to see if it was any kernel signing issue from the open source driver(Out of Tree) for that WiFi hardware. So that’s not it AFAIK.

      • #2397739

        You probably are missing some security patches (hardening). Go here to help you see what you might be missing.

        https://ubuntu.com/security/notices

        As far as wifi, get a wifi dongle from Panda. It’s got it’s own drivers and should work with any kernel. I’m sure there are other brands that alo work. Panda is what I have experience with.

    • #2400605

      Kernel security updates issued for various Ubuntu’s and derivatives.
      Published Nov 9th 2021
      18:04LTS
      https://ubuntu.com/security/notices/USN-5137-1

      20:04LTS, 21:04 and 21:10
      https://ubuntu.com/security/notices/USN-5135-1

      Seems to be a mainly local issue but nevertheless the kernel updates succeeded without issue on both 19.3 Tricia and 20.1 Ulyssa distros.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2406630

      ? says:

      another day\another kernel,

      Commit Log for Thu Dec 16 11:00:10 2021
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.41.45~20.04.19) to 5.11.0.43.47~20.04.21
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.41.45~20.04.19) to 5.11.0.43.47~20.04.21
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.41.45~20.04.19) to 5.11.0.43.47~20.04.21

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.11.0-43-generic (5.11.0-43.47~20.04.2)
      linux-hwe-5.11-headers-5.11.0-43 (5.11.0-43.47~20.04.2)
      linux-image-5.11.0-43-generic (5.11.0-43.47~20.04.2)
      linux-modules-5.11.0-43-generic (5.11.0-43.47~20.04.2)
      linux-modules-extra-5.11.0-43-generic (5.11.0-43.47~20.04.2)

      i’m wondering if i will be offered the 5.15 kernel on this 20.04 lts?

    • #2407021

      Updated Debian 11: 11.2 bullseye released

      December 18th, 2021

      The Debian project is pleased to announce the second update of its stable distribution Debian 11 (codename bullseye). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

      Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 11 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old bullseye media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

      Those who frequently install updates from security.debian.org won’t have to update many packages, and most such updates are included in the point release…

    • #2419152

      ? says:

      synaptic just sent (Ubuntu) security patch for kernel:

      Commit Log for Tue Jan 18 11:54:06 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.46.51~20.04.23) to 5.13.0.25.26~20.04.12
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.46.51~20.04.23) to 5.13.0.25.26~20.04.12
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.11.0.46.51~20.04.23) to 5.13.0.25.26~20.04.12

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.13.0-25-generic (5.13.0-25.26~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.13-headers-5.13.0-25 (5.13.0-25.26~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.13.0-25-generic (5.13.0-25.26~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.13.0-25-generic (5.13.0-25.26~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.13.0-25-generic (5.13.0-25.26~20.04.1)

      moved from 5.11 to 5.13

    • #2419400

      ? says:

      5.13.0-25.26 only lasted for 1 day, now security kernel patch is on 5.13.0.27.29:

      Commit Log for Wed Jan 19 12:40:22 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.25.26~20.04.12) to 5.13.0.27.29~20.04.13
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.25.26~20.04.12) to 5.13.0.27.29~20.04.13
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.25.26~20.04.12) to 5.13.0.27.29~20.04.13
      linux-libc-dev (5.4.0-94.106) to 5.4.0-96.109

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.13.0-27-generic (5.13.0-27.29~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.13-headers-5.13.0-27 (5.13.0-27.29~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.13.0-27-generic (5.13.0-27.29~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.13.0-27-generic (5.13.0-27.29~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.13.0-27-generic (5.13.0-27.29~20.04.1)

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2422640

      Ubuntu Samba Vulnerability
      February 1st 2022

      Homeusers: A security bug has been found that allows remote attackers to excecute code as root on a system..
      Check your updater 🙂

      CVE-2022-0336
      CVE-2021-43566
      CVE-2021-44142

      Affects Ubuntu 18.04, 20.04 and 21.10
      as per https://ubuntu.com/security/notices
      with respective links and info for your version.

      Also affects RHL, RHLE, SUSE and others..

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2422662

      ? says;

      thank you, Microfix;

      Commit Log for Tue Feb  1 09:15:26 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      libsmbclient (2:4.13.14+dfsg-0ubuntu0.20.04.4) to 2:4.13.17~dfsg-0ubuntu0.21.04.1
      libwbclient0 (2:4.13.14+dfsg-0ubuntu0.20.04.4) to 2:4.13.17~dfsg-0ubuntu0.21.04.1
      samba-libs (2:4.13.14+dfsg-0ubuntu0.20.04.4) to 2:4.13.17~dfsg-0ubuntu0.21.04.1

      although i don’t use it,

      sudo systemctl disable cups
      sudo systemctl disable cups-browsed

      always good to keep it updated…

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2422684

        Thanks anon, That’s one of the first things I do post fresh install, kill off services, don’t need around eight defaults then install resolvconf which doesn’t come in by default in Mint, services sorted thereafter 😉

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2422708

      As a non-tech user, the last 5 posts are well beyond my understanding.  We currently run Mint 19.2 and there are no uninstalled updates currently offered.  Do we need to take any action in response to these posts?

      Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

      • #2422720

        I’m on 19.2 also and am being offered a new kernel and a Samba update. When I look at the change log it says “urgency = medium”.

        Personally, I’m waiting a few days before installing them.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2422729

          When we moved from Win7 to Mint, one of the pleasant surprises was that installing updates was basically a non-event compared to the ongoing MS updating train wreck.  Our practice on Mint has been to install updates when offered, and we have never had any problems.  Have we just been lucky?

          Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

          • #2422735

            Having dealt with many versions of Windows (primarily up through 8.1 and now in the last month I’ve unfortunately been saddled with a 10 computer I need to maintain), macOS (starting with High Sierra up through Catalina) and Ubuntu and Mint, it’s been my experience that Ubuntu and Mint updates are far superior to any offered by Windows or macOS. They go in very quickly, with no drama, and they almost always work. Last summer there was a small problem with random system crashes after a kernel update, but it was easily fixed by a simple reversion to a previous kernel. I waited a week and a new fixed kernel was offered. Is that luck? I tend to doubt it.

            Now before anyone jumps on me, let me hasten to add I fully realize my experience is anecdotal evidence, and I’m not making any statement about “many eyes” being better or worse than any other “system”. I’m just reporting my experience.

            3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2422740

              Thanks for the insight.  Can you offer any suggestions going forward to us as relative babes in the woods?

              Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

            • #2422759

              My overarching strategy no matter what operating system is to wait. On Windows and mac OS that means 3 to 4 weeks, unless there’s something that’s extremely urgent. But I can’t remember anything being that urgent at least if you exercise some common sense when connected to the internet (I assume you have at least a default firewall enabled, a decent router and a supported pretty much up to date operating system).

              With Linux I usually install all offered updates between Thursday and Saturday of each week, unless it’s a kernel, in which case I wait at least a week, but still install on TH F or Sat. If there’s a problem with any update for any operating system I likely will read about it here at AskWoody. For linux I also check the following link to see if there are any updates labelled as a “regression”. It’s for Ubuntu, but most of the patches show up for Mint.

              https://ubuntu.com/security/notices

              Unless you really know what you’re doing with images, restores, reinstalling operating systems, etc. (and I don’t really know what I’m doing with that stuff; I’ve done it all but I don’t like or enjoy doing it, and I’ve got many other things I’d rather spend my time on) I think waiting and using common sense is very good strategy and it’s worked for me. Just my opinion.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2422864

              Many thanks for that insight.  I am not at all comfortable getting “under the hood” so to speak, and this forum has been a lifesaver for me on many occasions.  Is the reason for waiting to see if others have problems with a given update?  Are updates ever “recalled” for corrections?

              Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2422876

              ? says:

              Slowpoke47

              i haven’t seen any “recalled,” just a fixed code version offered later. i use Synaptic Package Manager because it gives me full control of the patching game…

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2422892

              @slowpoke47 – Yes, the reason for waiting is to see if others are having any trouble, and if they are, whether any fixes have been released. An example of a regression is here:

              https://ubuntu.com/security/notices?page=4

              This is page 4 of the link I posted above. Scroll down to USN-5210-2. If you click on that you’ll get more details. The original kernel update notice was USN-5210-1. It apparently had a bug in it which is fixed in the new kernel described in USN-5210-2. This one involved the 5.4 kernel, which I don’t have and I don’t think you do either, so need to worry about it. It’s just an example of what I mentioned above. Reassuringly, if you start scrolling through pages you won’t find many regressions. But I like the fact that at least regressions are labelled. In Windows and macOS it seems a lot of times a patch will just suddenly no longer be offered, often with no explanation I can find. Then a few days later the same patch might be offered again, also sometimes without an explanation. If the “big guys” make a mistake I wish they would just own up to it, explain what’s going on and fix it.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2422910

              Oops! I left out an important word in my last post. I should have said “…so NO need to worry about it.”, in regards to the 5.4 kernel regression. My apologies.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2422916

              Yep, caught that.  even though I’m a Slowpoke 🙂.

              Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2422745

        We currently run Mint 19.2 and there are no uninstalled updates currently offered. Do we need to take any action in response to these posts?

        You probably know this but – just go to the Update Manager and click on “Refresh” in the upper left of the screen. If nothing new comes up, you’re good to go.

        Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2422716

      ? says:

      Slowpoke47, still on “don’t worry be happy,” as long as you keep your system updated…

      microfix, why do you set  resolvconf to anything beyond 127.0.0.53? i use linux on sticks  with wifi only and dhcp so my resolve DNS server comes through the router/isp dictates. if i need dig to tell me who is what i specify @8.8.8.8 or @1.1.1.1 per inquiry for NS, ANY, ALL ect. please explain the benefit of adding the optional server(s). thank you, man you always rock.

      ps i used to build ubuntu from the server iso, now i just do the min. install option and root out the other stuff i don’t want/need…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2422853

      ? says:

      kernel a week club:

      Commit Log for Wed Feb  2 08:30:33 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.27.29~20.04.13) to 5.13.0.28.31~20.04.15
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.27.29~20.04.13) to 5.13.0.28.31~20.04.15
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.27.29~20.04.13) to 5.13.0.28.31~20.04.15
      linux-libc-dev (5.4.0-96.109) to 5.4.0-97.110

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.13.0-28-generic (5.13.0-28.31~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.13-headers-5.13.0-28 (5.13.0-28.31~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.13.0-28-generic (5.13.0-28.31~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.13.0-28-generic (5.13.0-28.31~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.13.0-28-generic (5.13.0-28.31~20.04.1)

      they come as security so i install them. i have 5.4, 5.8, 5.11 and 5.13 on hand just because…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2423558

      I’ve installed the latest Samba update and also a new kernel (breaking my rule of waiting at least a week before installing new kernels – I just wanted to get it done in order to have a couple days where I don’t have to think at all about any computer updates) on three Mint 19.2 Cinnamon computers (two of which double boot with Win 7). I’ve rebooted all three at least 3 times, checked internet and a few programs like VLC player, Document Viewer, Image Viewer) and all seems fine. The old kernel was 4.15.0-166 and the new one is 4.15.0-167

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2425434

      USN-5284-1: Browser vulnerabilities

      Affected: Ubuntu 21.10, 20.04 LTS and 18.04 LTS

      Ref: https://ubuntu.com/security/notices/USN-5284-1

      Multiple security issues were discovered in Firefox. If a user were
      tricked into opening a specially crafted website, an attacker could
      potentially exploit these to cause a denial of service, bypass security
      restrictions, obtain sensitive information, or execute arbitrary code.
      (CVE-2022-0511, CVE-2022-22755, CVE-2022-22759, CVE-2022-22760, CVE-2022-22761, CVE-2022-22764)….

      Check your chosen update method..

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2425542

        Quick FYI – I’m not yet being offered it through Update Manager on my Mint 19.2 Cinnamon daily driver. Seems like it usually takes a couple days to make it downstream to Mint.

        • #2425546

          Not yet?, I think ubuntu has fudged something somewhere in THEIR favour of so called ‘security’ that interferes with the standard Mozilla Firefox as there are NO official updates for Mozilla Firefox.
          Don’t you find it a strange coincidence that Linux Mint changed things regarding firefox earlier this year? now this from ubuntu? and nothing from mozilla…as it stands from Mozilla the Final releases are:
          22/02/08 – Firefox 97.0
          22/02/08 – Firefox ESR 91.6

        • #2425555

          Yes, I do think it’s strange. I haven’t documented this but it does seem that it takes a couple days more for the FF updates to swim downstream to Mint and its Update Manager, than it did before the Mint/Mozilla agreement. Right now I’ve got FF 97.0 on my Mint 19.2 daily driver, no indication of a build number, and a statement to the effect that updates are disabled by my system administrator. That last statement seems new to me since the agreement. I’m guessing tomorrow or Thursday before I see the Build 2 update referenced in your link above (USN-5284-1)

    • #2427127

      ? says:

      more kernel security updates:

      Commit Log for Tue Feb 22 08:03:08 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic (4.15.0.167.156) to 4.15.0.169.158
      linux-headers-generic (4.15.0.167.156) to 4.15.0.169.158
      linux-image-generic (4.15.0.167.156) to 4.15.0.169.158

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-4.15.0-169 (4.15.0-169.177)
      linux-headers-4.15.0-169-generic (4.15.0-169.177)
      linux-image-4.15.0-169-generic (4.15.0-169.177)
      linux-modules-4.15.0-169-generic (4.15.0-169.177)
      linux-modules-extra-4.15.0-169-generic

      plus bonus, libexpat1 (2.2.5-3ubuntu0.2) to 2.2.5-3ubuntu0.4

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2430376

      ? says;

      beware the ides of march:

      Commit Log for Wed Mar  9 07:30:10 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.30.33~20.04.17) to 5.13.0.35.40~20.04.20
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.30.33~20.04.17) to 5.13.0.35.40~20.04.20
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.30.33~20.04.17) to 5.13.0.35.40~20.04.20
      linux-libc-dev (5.4.0-100.113) to 5.4.0-104.118

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.13.0-35-generic (5.13.0-35.40~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.13-headers-5.13.0-35 (5.13.0-35.40~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.13.0-35-generic (5.13.0-35.40~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.13.0-35-generic (5.13.0-35.40~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.13.0-35-generic (5.13.0-35.40~20.04.1)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2430891

      ? says:

      if you run old laptop with rs690m radeon card beware of the latest mesa security patches. glitch in packages wipes out display adapter resulting in no desktop in ubuntu 20.04. yes, this is the third time in 6 years this has happened. i locked the packages in synaptic on the other os until they get it fixed…

    • #2432060

      ? says:

      just revived one of the three ubuntu 20.04’s the mesa update took out, involved downloading the previous file versions and downgrading the broken files. so, if any one had a desktop fail there is hope of fixing it besides wiping and rebuilding. i’ve lost 6 or seven ubuntu installations to the mesa updates over the last 7 years…

    • #2432108

      ? says:

      yahoo! i’m posting from ubuntu 20.04 gnome the third broken desktop. i must thank Mr. Liam McDonagh-Greaves who figured out just how to accomplish this heretofore impossible task. if interested in how to rescue a broken ubuntu install due to incompatible security patches see:

      https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/mesa/+bug/1798868

       

    • #2433774

      ? says:

      another kernel security patch on ubuntu 20.04 LTS:

      Commit Log for Wed Mar 23 07:43:47 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.35.40~20.04.20) to 5.13.0.37.42~20.04.22
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.35.40~20.04.20) to 5.13.0.37.42~20.04.22
      linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.35.40~20.04.20) to 5.13.0.37.42~20.04.22
      linux-libc-dev (5.4.0-104.118) to 5.4.0-105.119

      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.13.0-37-generic (5.13.0-37.42~20.04.1)
      linux-hwe-5.13-headers-5.13.0-37 (5.13.0-37.42~20.04.1)
      linux-image-5.13.0-37-generic (5.13.0-37.42~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-5.13.0-37-generic (5.13.0-37.42~20.04.1)
      linux-modules-extra-5.13.0-37-generic (5.13.0-37.42~20.04.1)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2433870

      ? says:

      really big security update:
      >uname -r
      5.15.0-22-generic
      >cat /etc/os-release
      PRETTY_NAME=”Ubuntu Jammy Jellyfish (development branch)”
      NAME=”Ubuntu”
      VERSION_ID=”22.04″
      VERSION=”22.04 (Jammy Jellyfish)”
      VERSION_CODENAME=jammy
      ID=ubuntu
      ID_LIKE=debian
      HOME_URL=”https://www.ubuntu.com/”
      SUPPORT_URL=”https://help.ubuntu.com/”
      BUG_REPORT_URL=”https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/”
      UBUNTU_CODENAME=jammy
      if you like linux take a spin on this baby. works great on extra-long-in-the tooth circa 2007 Acer AMD laptop right outta the box. again, can your Windows do that?…

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2434164

      HEADS UP FOLKS!!

      24th March 2022
      Ubuntu has issued REMOTE vector security fixes for the following:

      USN-5346-1:

      Linux kernel (OEM) vulnerability which affects multiple 20.04 LTS kernels.

      It was discovered that the ICMPv6 implementation in the Linux kernel did
      not properly deallocate memory in certain situations. A remote attacker
      could possibly use this to cause a denial of service (memory exhaustion).

      REF: https://ubuntu.com/security/notices/USN-5346-1

      USN-5347-1:
      OpenVPN vulnerability affects 18.04 LTS, 20.04 LTS and 21.10

      It was discovered that OpenVPN incorrectly handled certain configurations
      with multiple authentication plugins. A remote attacker could possibly use
      this issue to bypass authentication using incomplete credentials.

      REF: https://ubuntu.com/security/notices/USN-5347-1

      expect updates very soon from Linux Mint and others…

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2434169

      Just installed the VPN update on 2 Mint 19.2 Cinnamon. Also installed the 4.15.0-173 kernel, although this is not the one in @Microfix‘s post immediately above (it’s USN-5339-1)

      Everything seems fine.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2434216

      ? says:

      thanks for the warning(s). for ipv6 i use this in grub config:

      GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=”quiet splash ipv6.disable=1″

      openvpn:

      Commit Log for Thu Mar 24 10:07:24 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      openvpn (2.4.7-1ubuntu2.20.04.2) to 2.4.7-1ubuntu2.20.04.4

      and the latest kernel update is a couple of posts above.

      more reasons to love Linux…

      • #2434223

        more reasons to love Linux…

        Frequent updates for multiple packages? Windows does that too.

        Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.608 + Microsoft Edge/365

        • #2434228

          ? says:

          yes,  thank you b. i love all the windows up to win7; however, linus doesn’t charge me to use his services, and they very rarely break the operating system. in fact, windows (after 7) won’t even begin run on this 15 year old laptop…

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2434247

            We were fine with MS until they threw 7 under the bus.  When I saw what a train wreck W10 was shaping up to be (mostly in the weekly postmortems on this forum), plus that MS added telemetry. we were pleased to move to Linux.  No regrets!

            The Mint learning curve has at times been steep, but returning to  MS is not an option.

            Linux Mint Mate 19.2 & 20.3

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2434280

        @anon, alternatively within sysctl.conf add:
        # IPv6 disabled
        net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6 = 1
        net.ipv6.conf.default.disable_ipv6 = 1
        net.ipv6.conf.lo.disable_ipv6 = 1

        job done 😉

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2434401

      ? says:

      thank you, Microfix for the sysclt, rc.local method. i tend to use my microsoft hammer when toying with computers hence the boot time ipv6 disabler. i don’t have connection problems i just watch the comings and goings with >sudo watch -n 6 netstat -atunop. the 6 is used when i’ve had my morning coffee…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2440616

      ? says:

      for linus security aficionados:

      two new kernel’s in town:

      Commit Log for Tue Apr 19 18:02:46 2022

      linux-image-5.4.0-109-generic (5.4.0-109.123) and his big brother,

      linux-image-5.13.0-37-generic

      on to 5.15 in a couple of days…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2440618

      ? says:

      kernel-oops, i cut-n-pasted w/o looking, i ment to say:

      Commit Log for Tue Apr 19 17:29:50 2022

      linux-image-5.13.0-40-generic (5.13.0-40.45~20.04.1), the 5.13.0.37 one above went bye,bye…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2448599

      ? says:

      latest and greatest:

      Commit Log for Mon May 23 16:32:55 2022

      linux-image-5.13.0-44-generic (5.13.0-44.49~20.04.1)

      inux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.13.0.41.46~20.04.26) to 5.13.0.44.49~20.04.28

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2448786

      ? says:

      just had problems updating ubuntu 22.04 kernel, don’t know why it just took an hour to get it shoved in.

      Commit Log for Tue May 24 12:02:58 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      linux-generic-hwe-22.04 (5.15.0.30.33) to 5.15.0.33.36
      linux-headers-generic-hwe-22.04 (5.15.0.30.33) to 5.15.0.33.36
      linux-image-generic-hwe-22.04 (5.15.0.30.33) to 5.15.0.33.36
      Installed the following packages:
      linux-headers-5.15.0-33 (5.15.0-33.34)
      linux-headers-5.15.0-33-generic (5.15.0-33.34)
      linux-image-5.15.0-33-generic (5.15.0-33.34)
      linux-modules-5.15.0-33-generic (5.15.0-33.34)
      linux-modules-extra-5.15.0-33-generic (5.15.0-33.34)

      and i think these have something to do with the latest security problem(s), firefox has already addressed, firefox-esr (91.9.1esr+build1-0ubuntu0.22.04.1) to 91.10.0esr+build1-0ubuntu0.22.04.1

      Upgraded the following packages:
      gir1.2-javascriptcoregtk-4.0 (2.36.0-2ubuntu1) to 2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1
      gir1.2-webkit2-4.0 (2.36.0-2ubuntu1) to 2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1
      libjavascriptcoregtk-4.0-18 (2.36.0-2ubuntu1) to 2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1
      libwebkit2gtk-4.0-37 (2.36.0-2ubuntu1) to 2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1
      orca (42.0-1ubuntu1) to 42.0-1ubuntu2

      and

      Upgraded the following packages:
      accountsservice (22.07.5-2ubuntu1) to 22.07.5-2ubuntu1.3
      gir1.2-accountsservice-1.0 (22.07.5-2ubuntu1) to 22.07.5-2ubuntu1.3
      libaccountsservice0 (22.07.5-2ubuntu1) to 22.07.5-2ubuntu1.3

      happy patching, y’all…

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2450273

      ? says:

      more jabba the script fine tuning

      Commit Log for Wed Jun  1 09:12:36 2022
      Upgraded the following packages:
      gir1.2-javascriptcoregtk-4.0 (2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1) to 2.36.3-0ubuntu0.22.04.1
      gir1.2-webkit2-4.0 (2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1) to 2.36.3-0ubuntu0.22.04.1
      libjavascriptcoregtk-4.0-18 (2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1) to 2.36.3-0ubuntu0.22.04.1
      libwebkit2gtk-4.0-37 (2.36.2-0ubuntu0.22.04.1) to 2.36.3-0ubuntu0.22.04.1

      last version arrived 5/24…

    Viewing 72 reply threads
    Reply To: Security Update for Linux Distros

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use all available BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Your information: