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  • Security Update for Linux Distros

    Home Forums AskWoody support Non-Windows operating systems Linux – all distros Security Update for Linux Distros

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      • #2379017
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        Well after reading this article over on Bleeping Computer I re-checked the Mint update manager and lo and behold, patches were waiting for systemd and initramfs (which were not there 10 minutes previous)

        Systemd:
        * SECURITY UPDATE: DoS via DHCP FORCERENEW
        – debian/patches/CVE-2020-13529.patch: tentatively ignore FORCERENEW
        command in src/libsystemd-network/sd-dhcp-client.c.
        – CVE-2020-13529
        * SECURITY UPDATE: denial of service via stack exhaustion
        – debian/patches/CVE-2021-33910.patch: do not use strdupa() on a path in src/basic/unit-name.c.
        – CVE-2021-33910

        from Linux Mint changelog

        Post install:
        Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 18:09:08 2021

        Upgraded the following packages:
        initramfs-tools (0.130ubuntu3.12) to 0.130ubuntu3.13
        initramfs-tools-bin (0.130ubuntu3.12) to 0.130ubuntu3.13
        initramfs-tools-core (0.130ubuntu3.12) to 0.130ubuntu3.13
        libnss-myhostname (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        libnss-systemd (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        libpam-systemd (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        libsystemd0 (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        libudev1 (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        systemd (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        systemd-coredump (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        systemd-sysv (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49
        udev (237-3ubuntu10.48) to 237-3ubuntu10.49

        Check your system updater ASAP 🙂

        | Quality over Quantity |
        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379090
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        ..and following that, received a new Kernel update: 4.15.0-147.151
        Then got hit with a blank screen on reboot (using LVM/LUKS)
        reported: lvm-mint missing!
        ok, hard reset then loaded grub bootloader to revert back to
        previous kernel booted up ok although the Mint logo at encryption screen was missing.
        Logged in ok and no errors in error log.
        tomorrow is another day 😉

        History log:

        history

        | Quality over Quantity |
        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379094
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        Well, that’s pretty disappointing! I was all set to install the updates on my daily driver Mint 19.2 Cinnamon. Guess I’m going to wait a day or two… or more. Wish I had a better idea of just what an attacker needs to do to exploit the vulnerabilities.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2379097
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          Whatever it is on this system, seems to affect first stage encryption, the ‘lvm-mint missing’ will only be attributed to encrypted storage. EXT4 without encryption may/may not be ok, dunno yet. I’ll check for reports on the mint forums and echo back should others encounter issues. sigh

          edit: I’m gonna try a different kernel 5.4.0.80 and see what happens

          | Quality over Quantity |
          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2379099
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          Changed kernels to 5.4.0.80 and the system booted fine, no errors in logs although the login screen is still missing the mint logo. I’ll be sticking with this and mask the suspend (to prevent the freeze on this systems hardware and kernel)
          As you stated, there doesn’t seem to be an explanation on how the exploit is accessed, yet. I’d rather close this potential than leave it open. YMMV

          54kernel

          I think I’ll have a look at my plymouth config tomorrow to see if there is anything there causing the disappearance/conflict of the mint logo..

          | Quality over Quantity |
          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379098
        Ascaris
        AskWoody MVP

        I accepted all of the changes offered in KDE Plasma (based on Ubuntu 20.04 like recent versions of Mint), and it booted and works fine, including with my LUKS encrypted (Ext4) volume. I am using Ubuntu kernel 5.11 (from the HWE-Edge stack).

        You don’t need to wait a few days if you’re concerned about the issue Microfix had. It’s easy enough to select the old kernel if something goes wrong (also as Microfix did).

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.4 User Edition)

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379107
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        got this on 18.04 and 20.04 earlier today:

        Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 13:48:07 2021
        Upgraded the following packages:
        libnss-systemd 237-3ubuntu10.49
        libpam-systemd 237-3ubuntu10.49
        libsystemd0 237-3ubuntu10.49
        libudev1 237-3ubuntu10.49
        systemd 237-3ubuntu10.49
        systemd-sysv 237-3ubuntu10.49
        udev 237-3ubuntu10.49

        then just got this:

        Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 16:55:51 2021
        Upgraded the following packages:
        linux-generic 4.15.0.151.139
        linux-headers-generic 4.15.0.151.139
        linux-image-generic 4.15.0.151.139
        Installed the following packages:
        linux-headers-4.15.0-151
        linux-headers-4.15.0-151-generic )
        linux-image-4.15.0-151-generic
        linux-modules-4.15.0-151-generic
        linux-modules-extra-4.15.0-151-generic

        kernel is on the 18.04, seems to be working ok.

         

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      • #2379121
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        and this on 20.04’s:

        Commit Log for Tue Jul 20 17:58:08 2021
        Upgraded the following packages:
        linux-generic-hwe-20.04 5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45

        linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45
        linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04  5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45
        linux-libc-dev 5.4.0-80.90

        Installed the following packages:
        linux-headers-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
        linux-hwe-5.8-headers-5.8.0-63 (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
        linux-image-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
        linux-modules-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)
        linux-modules-extra-5.8.0-63-generic (5.8.0-63.71~20.04.1)

         

      • #2379156
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        Microfix, which of the updates do you think is causing the problem? Systemd, Initramfs-tools, the first new kernel, or a combination of all?  I’m so glad I checked back here before installing these two updates.

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by Charlie.
        • #2379178
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          Charlie, I think it may be my configuration and/or hardware dependant.
          If I was in your shoes, I’d update ASAP given the nature of the updates.

          | Quality over Quantity |
          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379176
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        For what it’s worth I just installed the systemd, initramfs-tools, and kernel 4.15.0-151.157 patches on a 2009 HP Pavilion laptop with AMD Athlon processor and ATI Radeon graphics. They were installed one at a time in the order given above with a shutdown and start after each one, even though the only one that required a restart was the kernel. There is no encryption, just a standard single boot Mint Cinnamon 19.2 installation.

        Everything seems completely normal and functioning. Absolutely nothing odd/unusual happened.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2379270
          Slowpoke47
          AskWoody Plus

          I’m going to try this method, first on our newly-set-up laptop.  If that works out, I’ll do the desktop.  Now with two working computers in the house, I can look for help on one if I go wrong with the other.

          Edit:  In the laptop, same OS, no updates are currently offered and none are found using Update Manager.  Will let this fester for a while and see what if anything changes.

          Linux Mint Mate 19.2

      • #2379177
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        On bootup today with the 5.4.0.80 kernel the system booted fine, as was prior to update – go figure..

        So, tried 4.15.0-147.151 kernel again, same result as yesterday groan
        xsession error log displayed:

        ** (mate-settings-daemon:1558): CRITICAL **: 08:53:59.287: setup_background: assertion ‘p->bg == NULL’ failed

        Next: edited grub to disable plymouth theme, same result.

        I’m just gonna stick with 5.4.0.80 and wait for the next 4.15.0 xxx.xxx kernel to be released. Masked Hiber/standby as a precaution to clicking it by accident. IOW a long standing issue on this device with the 5.4 xxx kernel, which is why I prefer the 4.15 xxx.

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        • #2379199
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          UPDATE: Whilst on kernel 5.4.0.80, I did some more digging around and could not find anything obvious. Then I thought, might just re-enforce plymouth settings to see if that corrects anything, as the freeze and issues are all pre-OS login.

          So applied the following to the terminal:

          sudo update-alternatives --config default.plymouth

          selected default 0 then tried an older method of enforcing:

          sudo update-initramfs -u

          Grub updated using:

          sudo update-grub

          and rebooted.

          During reboot I accessed grub (left shift key held down during boot)
          and then loaded kernel 4.15.0-147.151…….
          ..black screen for ages then,
          YEAH! everything worked as intended!

          This must have been a plymouth glitch for this system as the netbook was fine with the 4.15.xx kernel upgrade earlier today.

          False+ then, update all good folks, better to be safe than sorry. Go get ’em

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          3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2379328
          Ascaris
          AskWoody MVP

          I’m just gonna stick with 5.4.0.80 and wait for the next 4.15.0 xxx.xxx kernel to be released. Masked Hiber/standby as a precaution to clicking it by accident. IOW a long standing issue on this device with the 5.4 xxx kernel, which is why I prefer the 4.15 xxx.

          Have you considered a newer kernel, to see if whatever issue is in 5.4 has been fixed?

          The Ubuntu repo for 20.04 has the 5.8 kernel (HWE stack), 5.11 kernel (HWE-Edge stack), and as I discovered just today, the 5.13 kernel (OEM stack). I just installed 5.13 OEM into my Dell G3 laptop, and I am about to do it on my Dell XPS 13 also (which actually came with the Ubuntu OEM kernel from the factory).

          If your Mint uses 4.15 by default, it sounds like it is a Bionic-based release, so I don’t know what the repo holds in that case. I would guess the OEM one would be available at least.

          You might even want to try suspend again on the latest version of 5.4, in case they finally ported the fix for the issue to that version (if there is one), if you haven’t already.

           

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.4 User Edition)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2379438
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            Yeah, whilst on 5.4 kernel earlier, the suspend issue is still there. Also on the 5.13 kernel on Solus Mate 4.3, so sticking with what works here until 2023 or a parts donor device.

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            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379192
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        Been running Mint going on 3 years now, and one of the pleasant surprises has been the problem-free updating procedure- unlike W7 and 10, almost a non-event.  On rare occasions, there has been a message, “could not install updates”, but no repercussions, and all went fine afterwards.

        As a non-tech, the previous posts in this thread are above my pay grade, but I’m concluding that, going forward, I should be more cautious installing updates.  Our computers run Mate 19.2, no encryption.  Can someone suggest a strategy re updating that may help us avoid a problem that I can’t overcome?

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2379200
          EricB
          AskWoody Plus

          FWIW, I have two VMs running Mint.  One running Mint 20.2 with Cinnamon and the other running Mint 20.1 with Mate.  Both installed the most recent batch of updates without a hitch.

          5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2379201
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          See my post above (grub access during boot) to revert to a previous kernel should something go south.

          no strategy required slowpoke47, just do it, that’s windows stinkin’ thinkin’ 🙂

          | Quality over Quantity |
          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379418
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        I did my updates last night (Systemd, & Initramfs-tools) and restarted after each install.  All went well.  I didn’t do the Kernel update though, I’m still at 4-15.0.139.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2379429
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          If your happy with it, that’s cool, however, have you read the Changelogs/CVE Tracker links on superseded kernels higher than 4-15.0.139?

          You’ll find these within Mint-Updater: Menubar> View> Linux Kernels

          IMHO you should update to the newest kernel version, we are here to help.
          Let the update do it’s thing and follow instructions.
          Reboot once the new kernel is updated..I’ve been doing that since forever on desktops/laptops using synaptic package manager on different distros before mint-updater on LM.

          | Quality over Quantity |
          • #2379563
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            If your happy with it, that’s cool, however, have you read the Changelogs/CVE Tracker links on superseded kernels higher than 4-15.0.139?

            Yes I have, and I also read the “Bug Report” that is in there with that group. I don’t install a new kernel if it has Bugs.  4-15.0.139 had no bugs for quite a while so I stuck with it since the newer kernels did have more bugs.

            Maybe I’m worrying about something that’s not that important, but some of those Bugs can look ominous.

      • #2379434
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        and the latest:

        Commit Log for Thu Jul 22 13:48:27 2021
        Upgraded the following packages:
        libnss-systemd to 237-3ubuntu10.50
        libpam-systemd 237-3ubuntu10.50
        libsystemd0 to 237-3ubuntu10.50
        libudev1 to 237-3ubuntu10.50
        systemd to 237-3ubuntu10.50
        systemd-sysv to 237-3ubuntu10.50
        udev to 237-3ubuntu10.50

        at least they are on a fix within two days.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379617
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        Here’s an update with some results I’m not sure what to make of.

        As I posted above I installed all the updates – systemd, initramfs, and 4.15.0-151 kernel – on an Hp Pavilion laptop. All was well and continues to be well.

        Installed the same updates on a Gateway Netbook. Everything seemed fine. Successful reboot and everything working. Set the computer aside for a couple hours and booted it up again only to have it freeze on a black screen with a non-blinking cursor at the upper left; it did not even get to he password login. I forced a shutdown and booted with the old 4.15.0-147 kernel; the boot was successful and everything worked. I shut down normally, the booted with the new 4.15.0-151 kernel and everything worked. I’ve shut down and started (cold starts, not restarts) 5 times since, all with the new kernel and each time everything has been fine. I’m thinking I might not have waited long enough on the frozen black screen, or that it was just a glitch – this computer has a history of infrequently booting without a wireless connection or with something a bit funky in the lower right system tray, such as a missing Update Manager icon, or a screen brightness icon substituted for the battery charging icon. In these cases a reboot fixes the wireless connection and would also fix the funky icons although in the latter cases I don’t typically reboot since everything else is just fine and in any case, these situations are quite rare. In any case all seems well.

        Moving on to an old Acer Aspire laptop, I installed the same updates as above, did the required reboot, and all seemed well. Then I tried to create a system snapshot in Timeshift. It started just fine so I left the computer for about 20 minutes, and came back to find that no snapshot had actually been created. I tried to create a snapshot again but got a window that said something like “snapshot created, can’t create snapshot”. The window flashed by so even after about 5 tries I’m not sure of exactly the right wording. I messed a bit with the scheduling of snapshots, but nothing worked. I shut the computer down, and then started it. It will not boot under any circumstances with either the new kernel or the old kernel. No matter which of those 2 kernels I pick (they are the only 2 I’ve tried), and whether it’s a normal or safe mode boot, I never even get to a login, but always end up with a black screen with “initramfs” and a blinking cursor preceded by a statement to type help for a list of commands. When I try to boot in safe mode I get a bunch of messages scrolling on the screen, ending with something to the effect of root file system failure.

        I have no idea what to do here other than perhaps to try to reinstall Mint 19.2. It seems that since there was a problem creating a snapshot, perhaps the issue is not caused by any of the systemd, initramfs, or kernel patches, particularly in light of the fact that the computer did successfully boot after installing those patches. On the other hand it seems a bit coincidental that I get a black screen with initramfs showing. I’m thinking, or perhaps hoping, that the issue is a hard drive failure rather than due to patching.

        All of this was to be preliminary testing for my daily driver. I’m a bit hesitant to update it now given the Acer failure. I’d welcome any comments/suggestions from folks, particularly regarding whether or not the Acer failure is due to installation of the three patches.

        One other tidbit FWIW: my daily driver is a Dell Inspiron from 2016. The other 3 computers mentioned above are all from 2009.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2381525
          Ascaris
          AskWoody MVP

          Sorry it took so long for the reply, but perhaps this article will help, if you are still having the issue.

          Edit: Never mind, just saw the followup messages. Glad it seems to be working!

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.4 User Edition)

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2381640
            DrBonzo
            AskWoody Plus

            Thanks for the article. The method described is what I ended up doing. Any
            idea why I have to invoke that method more than once? I’ll do it and things will seem fine for a while (perhaps a day or so). Then all of a sudden my machine freezes or freezes with black screen or can’t mount a usb flash drive, I’ll force a shutdown and when I start back up I have to go through the same procedure again.

            Also, as one of our Linux experts, after reading through this topic do have any insight as to what is causing the problems described here? Do you think it’s the kernel upgrade to 4.14.0-151 or the systemd or initramfs updates, or something else?

            I find all this fairly disappointing since Mint has, up until now, been rock solid for me on all 4 of my installations, and I really didn’t give updating a second thought since it’s always been extremely reliable.

            • #2381881
              Ascaris
              AskWoody MVP

              Also, as one of our Linux experts, after reading through this topic do have any insight as to what is causing the problems described here? Do you think it’s the kernel upgrade to 4.14.0-151 or the systemd or initramfs updates, or something else?

              fsck is short for ‘filesystem check’, the equivalent of Windows’ chkdisk. If it is repeatedly getting messed up, look to the disk in question (it should have told you which it was, if you have more than one). If it’s hanging where you have to force it off, that could possibly make this happen. It could also be that a disk is failing. It could also be a bug somewhere.

              I would use the GNOME disks tool (called ‘disks’ in Mint… it is installed by default) and check the SMART stats on the drive and see if there is anything unusual in there (bad blocks, uncorrectable errors, growing number of bad sectors, that kind of thing).

              It’s been a long time since I’ve had this happen, so I don’t have much information (I have to puzzle things out myself to learn how to fix it!).

              Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.4 User Edition)

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379639
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        The Gateway Netbook: given my device similar recent experience at the top of this thread, I think it’s attributed to plymouth and the initramfs update. It may be a glitch but, enforcing plymouth settings worked here, and is still working flawlessly.

        Acer Aspire Laptop: personally, I don’t use or have timeshift installed so can’t comment. Although you COULD try uninstalling timeshift, remove ~.config and ~.local hidden files attributed to timeshift from within your Home folder and then reinstall it (aka fresh installation), then reconfigure to your needs and see if that clears up the issue.
        Re-installing Linux Mint is a last resort and overly dramatic IMHO

        FYI: Only just got an update for mint-mirrors 1.2.1, wonder if ther has been a problem there or certs expired on mirrors?

        ***************************************
        EVERYONE USING LINUX MINT
        Just checked software sources within mint-updater and noticed some mirrors have dropped off. It would be wise to check your own system once this mint-mirror update is installed to update the mirrors listings.
        ***************************************

        | Quality over Quantity |
        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2379649
          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Plus

          The Gateway has been working fine ever since the one failed boot. I was describing what happened in case anyone else experienced the same thing.

          The problem with the Acer is that it just won’t boot! So, I can’t do anything to or with it. The only info I get when I try booting in safe mode is that the root file system failed. I don’t particularly care about Timeshift one way or another, but I thought perhaps it’s sudden inability to make a snapshot might be related to the computer’s failure to boot, or that it might suggest to someone a particular issue/problem.

          I just updated my daily driver and pretty much the same thing happened as happened with the Gateway. The installation went fine, as did the shutdown and subsequent start, and everything seemed to work fine. Then I sut down and started again after a few minutes. I got as far as the login request for password but it said it didn’t recognize something and couldn’t log me in. Somewhat ironically, though, it had a button that said “logout”. Since that was my only option, I clicked it and got a black screen with a blinking cursor at the upper left. I waited a few minutes and then forced a shutdown. I started the computer a couple minutes later with the new kernel and everything worked fine. I’ve since shutdown and started 5 times and it works flawlessly.

          So, anyway, 3 of my 4 Mint computers have updated successfully, although 2 of them had a minor glitch on the second start after installation. The fourth computer updated and booted once successfully but then something else has prevented it from booting. My guess is that it doesn’t have anything to do with updating, but rather a corrupted/bad or failing hard drive.

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          • #2379651
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            regarding the device that won’t boot;
            Load from the ‘live’ media (usb or otherwise) and using the tools within may be able to help establish what the issue is. And whilst there, access your device storage and see if log files show anything concerning failures.
            Although a separate topic for this issue would assist 🙂

            | Quality over Quantity |
            2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2381155
            DrBonzo
            AskWoody Plus

            Here’s a quick update on the Acer laptop that wouldn’t boot. It is NOT because of a bad hard drive, but I do think it’s a problem resulting from one of the the three updates: systemd, initramfs, or the new kernel 4.15.0-151, and most likely initramfs.

            My problem is exactly as stated in the first shaded box here:
            https://askubuntu.com/questions/137655/boot-drops-to-a-initramfs-prompts-busybox/817660#817660

            You can read through the solution replies but basically what I did was to enter ‘exit’ after the (initramfs). This gave me the location of the corrupted part of my file system (‘/dev/sda1/’) Then after the next (initramfs) I entered ‘fsck /dev/sda1/ -y’ Don’t use the apostrophies. You should see a bunch of ‘FIXED’ notations and then get yet another (initramfs). I then entered ‘exit’ which resulted in a black screen (easily solvable with a forced shutdown and then a start, after which I got a nice clean boot), but probably should have entered ‘reboot’. I’ve just finished starting and shutting down a couple times and all seems well. I’ll report back if anything heads south.

      • #2379688
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        More funky stuff to report regarding my daily driver that I mentioned 2 posts up (#2379649).

        As I reported, it seemed OK after after the second boot after updating failed, with 5 subsequent boots all OK. I left the computer on for about 8 hours without using it and when I came back to it it was black screen and totally unresponsive. It was apparently on because it did respond to a forced shutdown. I started it and it took a bit longer than normal to get to the login screen. After entering my password it hesitated for about 10 seconds, then went black with the cursor arrow in the middle of the screen, at which point it just sat there for 5 minutes. I forced a shutdown and then started it (with the new kernel 4.15.0-151) and everything seems fine, once again.

        There’s some funky stuff going on with these updates. Pretty disappointing!

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2379813
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        Been a Mint user for about 3 years now, and this is the first serious update glitch I have encountered.  Much of this thread discussion is over my head, so I don’t know what the best strategy is regarding these updates.  Would the Mint coders be expected to put out corrected versions?  And if so, how do we at the receiving end know when that has happened?

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2379928
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        This same issue is under discussion on the Mint forum.  This is one suggestion posted there, but it doesn’t address the problem of what to do if those updates cause trouble.

        Somebody with Timeshift running should install all but the 3 shown below.
        Then take a snapshot.
        Then install these 3 one at a time in this order, with a snapshot between each one (2 more snapshots).

        • initramfs-tools
        • systemd
        • Kernel

        If no problems are encountered, then all is good. That is my thinking.

        https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?p=2044878#top

        Moderator Note: Please use the “Text” tab in the entry box when you copy/paste to avoid adding extraneous HTML.

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2

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        • #2380039
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          This is why I read the Bug Report on all Kernel updates (as stated above in report #2379563) found under – view – Kernels in Linux Mint’s Update Manager.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2381128
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m seeing a new Systemd security update in my Linux Mint Update Manager.  I’ve done all the other security updates and a couple software updates with no problem but am holding off on the new Systemd.  Anyone have any comment?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2381143
          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Plus

          Can you clarify what you mean by “new”. I installed a systemd update on July 24. The old version (the one I replaced) was 237-3ubuntu10.48 and the new one (the one I installed on July 27 was 237-3ubuntu10.50. I’m seeing these versions in the View/History of Updates menu of the Update Manager. I just checked my Update Manager and I’m not being offered any other systemd updates.

          Just curious – have you installed the 4.15.0-151 kernel? and how about the initramfs (probably version 0.130ubuntu3.13)

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          • #2381399
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            The old Systemd update is 237-3ubuntu10.49 (the last update I did).  The new Systemd is 237-3ubuntu10.50.  I did do the initramfs update, but haven’t done the latest kernel update yet.

            Linux Mint 19.1

      • #2381257
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        I’ve held off on any updating, waiting for others’ resolutions via this thread.  Currently offered 14 updates, see s/shots.  Looking for advice on which if any to install…Updates

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2

      • #2381422
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        @Charlie and Slowpoke47: In my opinion the ones to be careful with are systemd, initramfs, and the 4.15.0-151 kernel. All the troubles I’ve had came from these three, although I can’t say which troubles came which of the three.

        I’ve described what I did to resolve my problems. None of it is particularly hard to do, although if you’ve never done it you’ll perhaps be apprehensive. (In some ways the uncertainty and apprehensiveness is the hardest part – I speak from experience!).

        In Update Manager, View/Linux Kernels gives me an initial warning screen with instructions for reverting to a previous kernel. Those instructions work well, and combined with forced shutdowns (on laptops press and hold the power button for about 5 seconds until the machine shuts down; this works on some desktops, too, although on some desktops you literally have to unplug the machine)) got me out of almost all my troubles. The one exception was on my Acer laptop that wouldn’t boot but kept giving me (initramfs) with the expectation I would enter a command after that. I described above how I dealt with that problem.

        Depending on how adventurous you feel, I’d either go for it or I’d wait for the next systemd, initramfs, and kernel updates. I know there are some security holes in those three but I would think if you visit reputable websites and don’t click on ads or email links, you’ll be safe.

        That’s my opinion. Hopefully some of our Linux experts will offer their point of view, also.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2381460
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        please don’t be afraid of security patches. i suggest synaptic package manager. you can set it to show only security and just install those which is how i use it. one of my machines went to initramfs code 4 on the file system after the dog knocked on the usb stick containing the os while chasing the energetic tennis ball. at the initramfs prompt i typed “exit” and it re-ran the built-in troubleshooter telling me to run fsck to fix the corrupted file system. so, i asked it to run fsck -yf /dev/sda1 and watched it do it’s magic. presto changeo back in business. definitely not rocket science…

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2381464
          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Plus

          Yes, that’s what happened to my Acer laptop. The fsck command I used was a bit different than yours (I used fsck /dev/sda1/ -y), but apparently did the same thing.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2381480
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        I need to correct my command. I stated above that I used fsck /dev/sda1/ -y, but I used
        fsck /dev/sda1 -y. In other words remove the last ‘/’ in my original command.

        I discovered this when my daily driver suddenly froze and would not reboot after I forced a shutdown. So I forced another shutdown, started the machine and ended up with (initramfs). In other words same thing as happened on my Acer laptop. All seems fine now.

        Nothing bad will happen if you include the last ‘/’, you’ll just get a message that there is no such command.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2381604
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        I think I’ll take this opportunity to mention this here and now because it just started after I did the last update which included Systemd and initramfs.  My Sony laptop’s screen started to flicker and then went black completely. Shining a flashlight on the screen showed everything was up on the screen but apparently the backlight was out. After fooling around thinking my backlight had gone kaput, I closed everything and restarted the computer.

        Now the screen was lit up again! But after a few minutes it flickered and went out again.  I noticed this time when I closed the screen down all the way, the hard drive light flickered. So I raised the screen and it was lit again. In only a minute or so it went out again.

        Long story short, I finally found that putting the computer in sleep and then waking it up again made the screen stay on with no flickers or outages.  But this only works for that session. The next time I booted the computer up I was faced with the same problem, had to put in sleep mode, and then wake it up again. Then it’s okay for that session.

        Is there any possibility that one of those recent updates might be causing this weird behavior?  Any info. will be much appreciated.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2381606
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        Charlie, when i have a question about a “recent update,” causing problems i boot to a known good kernel and see if the same problems are occuring.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2381621
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        @Charlie – Good idea about shining a flashlight on the screen. After installing these updates I’ve had a few instances of a black screen after letting the computer sit for a while.

        It’s hard to say but I think the updates have something to do with your issue. Trying to boot with a previous known good kernel might help to decide if the issue is with the kernel, but I’m not sure it will help much deciding if the systemd and/or initramfs updates are at fault. Worth a try, though.

        I’m still getting intermittent funky behavior on my Dell Inspiron daily driver. I mentioned the black screen above, but I’ve also encountered issues mounting a usb flash drive. I shut down and when I started up I yet again got the (initramfs) prompt after which I entered “exit” and then an fsck command and then a reboot command. After which things seemed fine again. But it’s strange that I’ve had to do the (initramfs) thing twice on my daily driver and also twice on an old Acer laptop. I would have thought repairing the file system once would be enough. It seems that perhaps one of the updates keeps corrupting the file system.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2381836
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          I could kick myself for not doing a Timeshift backup before running a kernel update (Systemd is a red #4 Kernel Update).  But I’m not sure if TimeShift works on kernel updates.  I’ve got lots of chores to do today, but I’ll get back to you when I have something more to report on this situation.

        • #2381867
          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Plus

          There’s a new kernel out that supposedly addresses the fact that some CPUs were being frozen by 4.15.0-151. See the first entry under changelog here:

          https://www.ubuntuupdates.org/package/core/bionic/main/security/linux-headers-4.15.0-153-generic

          I’m being offered this new kernel but I’m sitting tight for a while until I can find more info about it.

          Edit to add: Here’s some more info. I don’t understand the technical stuff, but reading through the text comments, a lot of it sounds just like the stuff that’s been happening to 2 of my computers since installing the 4.15.0-151 kernel. This would tend to lend credence to booting with the old 4.15.0-147 kernel. I haven’t done that yet (I’m either too stupid or too stubborn trying to make the .151 kernel work!)

          https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1938013

      • #2381797
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        just in:

        Commit Log for Wed Aug  4 10:46:09 2021
        Upgraded the following packages:
        linux-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45) to 5.11.0.25.27~20.04.10
        linux-headers-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45) to 5.11.0.25.27~20.04.10
        linux-image-generic-hwe-20.04 (5.8.0.63.71~20.04.45) to 5.11.0.25.27~20.04.10

        Installed the following packages:
        linux-headers-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
        linux-hwe-5.11-headers-5.11.0-25 (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
        linux-image-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
        linux-modules-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)
        linux-modules-extra-5.11.0-25-generic (5.11.0-25.27~20.04.1)

        boots and runs as always

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