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  • Setting up a new PC: The first steps

    Posted on Tracey Capen Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Setting up a new PC: The first steps

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      • #2265413 Reply
        Tracey Capen
        AskWoody MVP

        WIDOWS BASICS By Susan Bradley Many Windows 7 users are upgrading to Win10 by simply purchasing a new PC. And that makes good sense. Not only are you
        [See the full post at: Setting up a new PC: The first steps]

        11 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2265423 Reply
        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        If you buy a new PC, make sure that the hard drive is big enough (at least 128 GB) and that you have enough RAM (at least 8 GB for 64-bit systems, which are just about all systems these days).

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #2265467 Reply
        Kathy70
        AskWoody Plus

        I am about to transition from a 2010 Win7 machine to a new, still-in-the-box Win10 computer. Last night, I started drafting a post with some questions. This morning, the newsletter popped up in my inbox. Susan Bradley read my mind! Thank you!

      • #2265500 Reply
        jhvance
        AskWoody Lounger

        The very first step I’ve always taken with a new PC after the user account setup is a de-crapification process to uninstall and remove lingering traces of most (though maybe not all) of the pre-loaded 3rd party applications.

      • #2265501 Reply
        RetiredGeek
        AskWoody MVP

        Susan,

        It may be unusual but the first step I take in setting up a new PC is to boot it from a Macrium Reflect Boot Disk/USB Key and do an Image Backup of the hard drive. Why you ask? Well, if during setup something should show up where I feel the need to return the machine to the vendor I can simply restore that Image and It’s like I never used it. Also If I ever sell the machine I can put it back to factory fresh condition. YMMV!

        The next thing I do is, like you, setup a local administrator account and get Windows fully installed and updated. Then I partition the drive into OS & Data partitions, I hate having my data mixed up with the OS. Now time to Image again!

        Now I setup a directory on the Data partition to hold my Documents usually named with xxxDocs where xxx are my initials or my wife’s.
        Continuing, I move the Documents,Downloads,Music,Pictures, and Videos folders to this xxxDocs Directory using the Location tab on the existing folders. I know other’s who move much more but so far this works well for me. Then restore my data to those directories from my latest Image of my existing/previous machine. Image again!

        Now It’s time to install and customize all my applications, the list is too long to reproduce. Image again.

        I do some further customization by creating Scheduled Tasks & shortcuts to run my applications that need Administrator access so I can leave UAC enabled but not be bothered by it.

        HTH 😎

        May the Forces of good computing be with you!

        RG

        PowerShell & VBA Rule!
        Computer Specs

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by RetiredGeek.
        6 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2265529 Reply
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          I do some further customization by creating Scheduled Tasks & shortcuts to run my applications that need Administrator access so I can leave UAC enabled but not be bothered by it.

          Believe it or not I have not yet set up the computer I built last year. I am still debating the Admin or Standard or Power User account conundrum. XP was always a regular user with lots of Runases set on shortcuts with password included. I have been running 7 and 10 as an admin as I think the UAC provides much of the security lacking in a Admin account. Do you have a thought on this?
          Do you have a link to how to ” creating Scheduled Tasks & shortcuts to run my applications that need Administrator access”??

          Stay Safe

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2266154 Reply
            RetiredGeek
            AskWoody MVP

            Wavy,

            I actually have a PowerShell program that automates the entire process. I need to make a few changes to make it Auto-Install then I’ll post it along with documentation.

            HTH 😎

            May the Forces of good computing be with you!

            RG

            PowerShell & VBA Rule!
            Computer Specs

          • #2266213 Reply
            RetiredGeek
            AskWoody MVP

            Wavy & Y’all,

            Ok here’s the program and documentation.

            Create-NoUACTaskShortcut
            .zip MD5 Hash: 6CD5447D6675672EADC24A8341C3AD4B
            .ps1 MD5 Hash: 3A35EE8A12DAF8A69A54DC37A97A3628

            HTH 😎

            May the Forces of good computing be with you!

            RG

            PowerShell & VBA Rule!
            Computer Specs

            Attachments:
            2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2265608 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Thank you for the article on Setting Up a New PC: The first steps.

        Would you elaborate on the process of setting up an Admin account, then downgrading it to a User account – like, how do you do that?

        Thanks,

        Steve

      • #2265667 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        when I received a new machine was to

        It’s nice to see your name again after severalyears without the Windows Secrets newsletter.

        The first thing that I did when I received this machine was to plug in a flash drive and install Belarc Advisor, then save the file as a record of what was in it. I also ran PCDecrapifier to get rid of any unwanted junk. Afterthat I used Ninite to installage is a good one – i a lot of my favorite apps.

        The macine came with Windows 10 Home. I considered updating to the Pro verion, but they want $99 for that.

        I have installed Fences, which I like.

        RGs idea of making a complete image is a good one – it hadn’t occurred to me.

         

      • #2265701 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        We have 3 laptops and a desktop in our household. I keep things fairly simple. We only have one login to the devices – and that login is an administrator login setup to auto logon. I’ know, I know, not recommended using the admin account as the only account or logging in automatically. It works for me as I’m fastidious about regular maintenance.

        I’ve done this since Windows 7. Can’t remember much about 95, 98 or Me, but similar IIRC?

        I’m vary careful about activity on our devices, and my wife just uses one laptop. I maintain it.

        I install Ccleaner and use that for regular file & registry cleaning. I like Ccleaner as a registry cleaner as it’s fairly conservative – so I’ve never really had any issues. I’ don’t even bother backing up the registry entries from within Ccleaner before deleting the found entries. The free version is all I use.

        I setup the desktop with small icons and always have a set of standard icons. This PC,  Logged in user folder below This PC. Control panel, Microsoft edge as my default browser and Firefox as my secondary. Outlook and then other Office icons on the desktop.

        I also turn off all windows animations and faded, but keep the look and fee by leaving ticked in advanced system settings>Performance Enable Peek, save taskbar thumbnails previews, shadows under windows, show translucent…, show windows content…, smooth edges…, and use drop shadows…

        I also remove most bloatware and only use Windows security for antivirus etc.

        I regularly clear out all that is allowed in the user (login) temporary folder as well a the Windows/Temp folder. Otherwise these two folders can fill up with junk. I also occasionally clear the prefetch folder. But only occasionally to keep it clear of disused prefetch files.

        I regularly defrag windows with the built-in defragmenter and befor the defrag I use an extended version of the built-in Windows cleanup process., creating a desktop shortcut with the target as follows.

        %SystemRoot%\System32\Cmd.exe /c Cleanmgr /sageset:65535 & Cleanmgr /sagerun:65535

        I also do semi regular Acronis true image full backups using only the recover boot CD you can create from within the programme. That way I can uninstall TrueImage as I never bother with the incremental backup option.

        If I ever get into a major issue or get stung by always logging in with admin privileges I can quickly do a full recover from a month or two ago. You could do a full disk image weekly if you wanted to.

        Regards,

         

        Paul

      • #2265847 Reply
        bratkinson
        AskWoody Plus

        Perhaps the biggest difficulty in buying a new Win 10 computer to replace a Win 7 is getting the programs (apps) and their related files over to the new machine.

        For me, it’s largely retrieve all the installation CDs & DVDs and load them all from scratch.  I have maybe 20-25 of those.  Then there’s another 25-30 downloaded and paid for products that I keep in a separate folder on my long term bulk storage drive.  Many of those, however, have updated versions that I downloaded and installed if the new version was free.  I’m sure I’m an oddball in that I keep all software installation CDs/DVDs together on a shelf at arms reach and all downloaded programs in a separate folder on my long-term storage hard drive.  Even 2 of my fellow computer geek friends don’t do that.  And none of the half dozen or so friends computers I’ve upgraded had a clue where any of the installation CDs were.

        Installing a freshly downloaded Mozilla Thunderbird (email) was problematic account my multiple address books, some of which are subsets of others.  I’ll leave it at that.

        These days, when I consult with a friend that wants to upgrade, I tell them what to look for….quad processor, 2.2ghz or better, 8 gb RAM and at least 250 gb hard drive.  None of my friends has ever had more than maybe 40-50 gb used on their old computer, including Windows!  And these days, absolutely do NOT buy one with the ‘S’ version of Windows (Windows 10 S) as it will not allow software to be downloaded from anywhere other than the Microsoft Store.  I wonder how many suckers Microsoft has lured in with THAT trick!

        Fortunately for my not-so-computer-savvy friends, pretty much all I have to do is move their documents and other files and install the same handful of software products, hopefully from their CD/DVDs.  Installing Adobe PDF Reader and Flash Player and IfranView (fast photo viewer) is standard.  Setting default programs for whatever browser and email they use, etc is next.  I then disable or delete some of the useless ‘bloatware’ in Win 10 including Xbox and others to make startup faster.

        For one friend that had the Office 2010 DVD for his computer, I first UNINSTALLED it on the old computer to ‘open up’ the serial number for reuse (I figured the uninstall would notify Microsoft), THEN installed it on the new computer with the same serial number.  No problem from Microsoft with that.

        Then there’s older software that fails to install in Win 10.  When Windows 10 was first announced, they had a ‘check your computer for compatibility’ product that not only analyzed my hardware but software as well.  It flagged Office 2010 and maybe 7-8 other products on my computer as incompatible.  (Upgrading from Win 98 to XP and later XP to Win 7 cost me $400-500 each time to upgrade and replace no longer compatible software – I still have an XP box as some vendors went out of business). Fortunately, they’ve improved Win 10 enough that all but one installed OK when I made the switch 6 months ago.  And one of the two that didn’t, ‘compatibility mode’ did the trick.  The setup program on the other (in compatibility mode) ‘fires off’ a separate task to actually install the product and I have to ‘catch’ that and initiate it in compatibility mode.  I have to figure its subparameters first, though.

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by bratkinson.
        • #2265861 Reply
          b
          AskWoody Plus

          And these days, absolutely do NOT buy one with the ‘S’ version of Windows (Windows 10 S) as it will not allow software to be downloaded from anywhere other than the Microsoft Store.  I wonder how many suckers Microsoft has lured in with THAT trick!

          It’s not a trick to lure suckers, just simpler and more secure if required.

          Switching out of S mode is free and quick; it’s usually as easy as 1, 2, 3:

          Windows 10 in S mode is designed for security and performance, exclusively running apps from the Microsoft Store. If you want to install an app that isn’t available in the Microsoft Store, you’ll need to switch out of S mode. Switching out of S mode is one-way. If you make the switch, you won’t be able to go back to Windows 10 in S mode. There’s no charge to switch out of S mode.

          1. On your PC running Windows 10 in S mode, open Settings > Update & Security > Activation.

          2. In the Switch to Windows 10 Home or Switch to Windows 10 Pro section, select Go to the Store. (If you also see an “Upgrade your edition of Windows” section, be careful not to click the “Go to the Store” link that appears there.)

          3. On the Switch out of S mode (or similar) page that appears in the Microsoft Store, select the Get button. After you see a confirmation message on the page, you’ll be able to install apps from outside of the Microsoft Store.

          Switching out of S mode in Windows 10

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          KP
      • #2265891 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Would you elaborate on the process of setting up an Admin account, then downgrading it

        You actually need 2 accounts.
        The account you use to set up Windows will be your admin account, so it should be a local account.
        When setup is done create a new account, either local or MS, it’s up to you. This account is the non-admin account you will use day to day.

        cheers, Paul

        • #2266356 Reply
          buttonupboots
          AskWoody Plus

          When setup is done create a new account, either local or MS, it’s up to you. This account is the non-admin account you will use day to day.

          Paul, having taken the second step and created a new account, is this day-to-day account the one that is used for ‘normal’ email, web browsing and updating Windows – much as a User account in Win7 would be ?

          If so, and apologies if this sounds dumb, why would you want or need a MS account for this purpose (day-to-day use) ?

          • #2266379 Reply
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            Yes, that is the account you use 99% of the time.

            Whether you use an MS account is up to you. I personally wouldn’t.

            cheers, Paul

            1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2266484 Reply
            Elly
            AskWoody MVP

            Hello, @buttonupboots-

            People that use other Microsoft services, such as X-Box, Office, One-Cloud, Skype, Outlook… and connect with and sync to other devices using Microsoft services… need to do so through a Microsoft account.

            You don’t need to establish a Microsoft account to activate and use W10, as @PaulT has shown you.

            You can find alternatives to Microsoft services that respect end user privacy… ProtonMail, Thunderbird, GOG, Jitsi, etc. and use them with your local account.

            Microsoft still assigns a permanent number to your computer, has a minimum of basic telemetry no matter what your preference, and does not allow you the illusion of being able to delete your data without a Microsoft account… so it doesn’t limit their access to your information by only using a local account. W10 is not a private operating system.

            Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

            2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2265904 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        You can (disapprovingly) also use an admin account all the time which MS should not allow to happen! a change the schematics and logic during windows set-up is needed, but hey, ho, whatdoIknow :)/

        • #2265930 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          I don’t disagree with you. Best practice and all that. But I’ve never bothered with a non-admin account. I know ALL the risks, but am reasonably careful, and as I mentioned a few posts ago, I do regular full Acronis backups. System restore has saved my bacon a few times, and I’ve only been stung with malware a couple of times. If I’m not convinced I’ve removed it all, I restore a backed up image. The only pain with restoring a backed up image is all the Windows/Office updates and a few programme updates to bring the build up to date. I don’t run too much stuff on my computers though.

          But sure, for most users it’s best not to use the admin account for daily use. I just keep it simple and don’t even setup a login password. But I also don’t store sensitive information on my PC/Laptops.

           

          Cheers,

          Paul

        • #2265980 Reply
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          You can (disapprovingly) also use an admin account all the time which MS should not allow to happen! a change the schematics and logic during windows set-up is needed, but hey, ho, whatdoIknow :)/

          It’s not up to Microsoft to decide what security procedures I follow.  They should “allow” whatever the heck I want to do with my PC, and they should do that because it is my PC. Microsoft’s failure to accept that with Windows 10 (most notably with update controls, telemetry controls, and unremovable “apps”) is why I moved to Linux.  It is not necessary for the maker of an OS to agree with my decisions, but it is necessary for that maker to carry them out anyway.

          I wouldn’t use a Windows XP-style admin account for everything now (full admin privileges all the time), but I did when I used XP, along with a HIPS that was even more obnoxious than UAC in the Vista days.  Far more obnoxious!

          If I still used Windows, I would be using an admin account with UAC enabled for everything, and indeed, I’m doing the Linux equivalent of that.  Limited or user accounts would be reserved for anyone borrowing my PC, if there ever were to be such a situation (and even then, only when my PC is within my sight).  There’s a reason UAC exists… to make it possible to run userspace programs in userspace but without having to go through all kinds of hassle to perform minor administrative tasks.  I tried running a limited account in XP, and it was very frustrating!

          With XP, it was possible to do a secondary logon with an admin account to perform a lot of admin things from within the user account, which is like a much less convenient version of UAC.  You could turn secondary logons off, but that would make any admin task even more of a pain than it already is in limited mode.

          As with Windows, the initial account you create upon installation of an Ubuntu-based distro will be an admin account, but not one that runs with admin privileges all the time (like a Windows XP admin account or ‘root’ in Linux). It makes sense, as there has to be at least one admin account with both Windows and Ubuntu, so you can’t have the first (thus potentially the only) one be a user account.  If the OS maker really wanted to get obnoxious about it, they could force users to also create a limited account, but you can’t force them to use the limited account for regular tasks if they wish to use the admin one instead.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.3).

      • #2265939 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        But I’ve never bothered with a non-admin account.

        Me too. I use Admin account exclusively.

      • #2266025 Reply
        Cthru
        AskWoody Plus

        I don’t know if it makes a difference, but, having been advised years ago by a neighbor who is an MS engineer not to use an admin account, I don’t. However, I set up a new PC using an Admin account to install applications, etc., then create a User  account and customize for daily use, i.e., desktop and taskbar shortcuts, application shortcuts, and so forth. In any case, the admin account is almost never used (I lead a simple life), though occasionally I am required to give an application admin permission to do something, such as changing an Acronis backup routine or something.

      • #2266065 Reply
        JohAnd
        AskWoody Plus

        Susan, your timing was perfect; thanks so much for this article. My self-esteem has risen since most of what you say is included in my standard practice. I am an elder (approaching 90) and am ready to switch from a desktop to a laptop. Our current situation gives me plenty of time to prepare. I’m currently in the process of reorganizing my file system. In the early days of ‘personal computers’ I organized my files by file type (.txt, .doc, .xls, etc.) which was useful in its day but now I want to eliminate that level. It’s a work in progress. THEN I’ll get the laptop.

        I’ve always worked as a standard user. But I’ve wanted to keep files available to my administrator account as well. Seemed like the best was was to store all files under ‘public’ rather than individual user. Do you have any alternative ideas to manage files across users? THANKS for all your articles. And thanks also to other lounge members for their comments!

      • #2266208 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        The one thing I would add is to relocate all windows special “My” folders to the D drive. The usual suspects are “My Videos”, “My Documents”, “My Pictures”, “My Music”, you get the idea. All I use C: for is OS and installed apps. Macrium Reflect is awesome and the free version lets me automate a monthly full image of C and a daily differential of C (incremental is only available with the paid version). Naturally, my images are stored in D:\Images.

        Now if I brick my system (usually by being too eager to install the latest Windows updates) I can just restore an image to C: without affecting my user data.

        As for D: backups – once a week to an external and once a month I mirror the external to an identical external. If you have only one backup then you effectively have no backup.

        • #2266336 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          I see no reason to move folders to another drive if you have enough space on C. It’s a long time since we had to manage space on a drive and if you have an SSD there is no speed penalty for having everything on the one disk.

          cheers, Paul

      • #2266224 Reply
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        With XP, it was possible to do a secondary logon with an admin account

        runas ??

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2266230 Reply
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          Yes.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.3).

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2266384 Reply
        Chris Greaves
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks for this, Susan. I am still on Win7HP, and confess to the scary Win10-upgrade stories in the media.

        I maintain a Word2003 (yes!) DOCument currently saved as “Rebuild072.doc”, which means it is 72 rebuilds old. Rebuild072 has a 131-row table which is my step-by-step process for doing a clean install from an original CD, and yes, NOT hooked up to the internet.

        Before this list, back in the Win3.1, or maybe Win95 days, I had a batch file which did the trick.

        In the table i accumulate all the tips and tricks which I continue to amass to customize my installation.

        The file is re-printed to a PDF after each update (Rebuild072.PDF), and that PDF is copied to my smartphone at the instant I start thinking about a rebuild, and the PDF and a copy of TrueCrypt is copied to two USB keys before i begin my backups …

        FRebuild

        Cheers

        Chris

        "Almost works" means it doesn’t work.

        Attachments:
      • #2266725 Reply
        buttonupboots
        AskWoody Plus

        and does not allow you the illusion of being able to delete your data without a Microsoft account…

        Thank you.

        I wonder if you would be kind enough to expand a little on that, especially the part where you say that data can’t be deleted w/o a MS account.  Again, please forgive my ignorance, but what sort of data is being considered here ?

        • #2267064 Reply
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          The “Privacy Dashboard“, which allows you to delete some data, is only available if signed in to a Microsoft account.

          Data that appears on the dashboard can include data related to your Bing and Cortana searches, Microsoft Edge browsing, and location, voice, media, and apps and services activity.

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      • #2266774 Reply
        Yash
        AskWoody Lounger

        Susan,

        Thanks for this most informative article. I’d like to add a couple of more things that I do when setting up a PC. This is from the WinXP days. My hard disk got corrupted once, and the only way out was to reformat the whole thing. Lost all my data.

        I’m currently using an HP Pavilion with 256GB SSD disk, that I dual boot with Linux. I’ve made a separate partition for this, so I used up 50GB for the Linux Mint.

        The first thing I did before installing Linux was to shrink the C: to about 125 GB. This I figure is more than sufficient for all the Windows files and any programs you may download. Of course, if you have a 1TB harddisk, then you could use even 150 or 200 GB. I set aside 50 GB for the Linux and 8 GB for the swap area, and could save about 60 GB and labelled it D:

        Since Windows by default saves all the folders Desktop, Documents, Videos, Downloads, Pictures in the C: under Users, the space in C drive is quickly used up by all the files in these folders. So, in Windows explorer, I right click>Properties> Location and move each of these folders to D:

        The system will ask you if you want to create a folder by that name, so you have to confirm. Next you will be asked about whether you want to move all the files to the new location (recommended). Once you confirm, then all the data will be moved into the D drive.

        This way, my C drive hasn’t been much cluttered, and the laptop doesn’t slow down for want of space. (It still shows 70 GB free in C: out of 125) Also, should there be a need to reinstall Windows, then only C: can be formatted, and the data is safe. If required, using a Linux live installation, the data can be safely transferred to another external drive, just to be sure. The only thing is probably the data cannot be encrypted, but then that is another story.

        Thanks to everyone else too for all your tips.

        Hope someone finds this helpful.

        Cheers.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2266839 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Since Windows by default saves all the folders Desktop, Documents, Videos, Downloads, Pictures in the C: under Users, the space in C drive is quickly used up by all the files in these folders. So, in Windows explorer, I right click>Properties> Location and move each of these folders to D:

        Then Microsoft issue an update like 1809 and all your hundreds of GB of photos, documents, music… just vanish.
        This has happened in the past, it will happen again.

        • #2266966 Reply
          RetiredGeek
          AskWoody MVP

          Alex,

          I’ve been moving my Documents, Pictures, etc. folders to a separate drive since W7 and I’ve never lost a single byte and I do mostly inplace upgrades. As always YMMV! 😎

          May the Forces of good computing be with you!

          RG

          PowerShell & VBA Rule!
          Computer Specs

      • #2266925 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Comments to “Setting up a new PC: The first steps” in 2020-05-25 AskWoody

        My name is Ulrich Noelpp, I’m born in 1939, so actually I have 80 years. My mother language is German, so please excuse my bad English! I studied experimental nuclear physics, finished with a PhD. During my studies I came to learn programming on a Zuse Z22 – the second computer installed in Switzerland, later I worked on IBM 1620 and IBM 360/370, also UNIVAC 1108, mostly with FORTRAN. For measuring I learned working  with DEC PDP8. In 1973 I started a job at Insel Hospital in Berne, where I installed the first PDP11, built the first network of PDP11’s, later VAXen. The most important decision for me was the installation of the first IBM-PC’s, at the end a had some 40 PC’s, 4 Mac’s, about 10 Suns under different UNIX-Versions and still 2 VAXen under VMS, all working in one WLAN sharing medical images …

        During that time I did almost all installations, all PC’s running under Windows-XP. Since I retired in 2004 I look after some 20 friends and colleagues, again doing their installations and being their first aid. I got a lot of inspiration and help from Windows Secrets and I am happy to receive now “AskWoody FREE Newsletter”.

        Thank you Susan for your article “Setting up a new PC: The first steps” in 2020-05-25 AskWoody. The work I do follows almost 100% your schedule. As I do not gain money with this work and as my “customers” do not work on their computer professionally I tend to install only freeware.

        Step 1:  Cleaning
        I normally start from the preinstalled W10, trying to purchase W10pro together with the PC, working with a local account too. I delete everything non Microsoft. Same as you.

        Step 2: Tweaks
        I do it exactly as you describe, enable File name extensions and Hidden items.
        I change all “special folders”(pictures, downloads, documents, music)  to be on D: drive, there I can backup them much more easily.

        Step 3: Desktop
        I install on the desktop application icons for all programs which my “customer” needs – we don’t work with tiles.
        And we don’t need menues

        Step 4: MS Office
        For a very long time I have installed Office2003. I don’t like the implications of MS365, so actually I’m switching over to Libre Office. Very old-fashioned: No software nor data in the cloud, everything locally! One-drive is uninstalled! We don’t want to have US services read our data. Unfortunately those providers offering cloud services with server farms in former Swiss army fortresses deep in our mountains are far to expensive for private users…

        Step 6: Drive encryption
        too complicated for me and my friends, I don’t do it

        Step 7: Backup
        I use a cheap program “Easy2Sync” Thomas Holz http://www.itsth.de . This program produces backups with normal file systems accessible by Windows explorer. I only run backups on the data disk(s), I never keep valuable data on my System disk. In case I produce a system crash, I reinstall Windows and all programs – resulting a fresh and faster system again!

        Step 10: Programs
        As mentioned before, I install a lot of freeware:
        Mozilla Firefox                 Browser
        Mozilla Thunderbird      e-mail client (here I put the “local” data files on drive D:
        VLC                                        Video player for all formats
        Irfan View                           Image Viewer for all formats, allows some simple manipulations and all changes of formats
        Acrobat Reader
        PDF24                                   simple PDF manipulations
        GIMP                                    Image Manipulator
        calibre                                  e-book management
        audiograbber                    CD-ripper, using LAME for mp3-encryption
        audacity                              sound file manipulator (also with LAME)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2268898 Reply
        KP
        AskWoody Plus

        I have been looking for a way to get Office to the Semi-Annual Channel and found it in Step 4’s Roll Back link.

        What I would add to Step 4 is

        • officec2rclient.exe” /update user updatetoversion=16.0.11929.20776

        This is based on the Semi-Annual Channel which can be Office 2016 1908 or Office 2016 1902. I choose 1908’s May 12, 2020 updates which translates to 11929.20776 hence 16.0.11929.20776 in the command.

        Thanks Susan

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by KP.
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