News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Setting up a new Win 10 Pro Workstation

    Posted on globalist Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Setting up a new Win 10 Pro Workstation

    Tagged: 

    This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  globalist 1 week, 3 days ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #1896593 Reply

      globalist
      AskWoody Lounger

      I have ordered a Win 10 Pro workstation to replace my 8-year-old Win 10 Home desktop.  The new workstation has a solid-state C: drive and a rotating disk D: drive.  The old and new machines have two user log-ons, each with a unique One-Drive access and with Office 365 and Outlook (outlook.com).

      1. Do I simply place programs on the C: drive and data on the D:drive, or is there a better allocation.
      2. I will be using PCmover to transfer the files.  Are there any warnings or hints?
      3. Are there any particular issues I should be aware of?

      Most of my aps are straightforward, and not computing intensive.  My use of Photoshop Elements for photo editing and Pinnacle Studio for video editing normally constitute my most demanding aps.

    • #1896636 Reply

      Kirsty
      Da Boss

      Hi @globalist – Welcome to AskWoody!

      The new workstation has a solid-state C: drive and a rotating disk D: drive. 

      Do I simply place programs on the C: drive and data on the D:drive, or is there a better allocation.

      What size are the two drives? This will probably influence your decisions.

      Also, what software will you be installing, apart from your Photoshop Elements & Pinaccle Studio? Will you be relying on cloud applications, or installed software? Software will need to be installed as new, rather than transferred.

      You may find that your rotating drive is not assigned to D:\ (I’ve seen E:\ as a secondary drive, where an optical drive was installed).

      • #1896690 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        What size are the two drives? This will probably influence your decisions.

        Also, what software will you be installing, apart from your Photoshop Elements & Pinaccle Studio? Will you be relying on cloud applications, or installed software? Software will need to be installed as new, rather than transferred.

        … and here I thought image processing and video editing were compute-intensive tasks… also may be disk-intensive sometimes.

        Speed of the rotating drive may become significant.

        Yes, there probably is a better allocation if one were to consider only system performance, but that would depend on hardware specifics and such…

        Once upon a time back when SSDs were newish, I heard it was optimal for heavy users to dedicate a SSD as a Photoshop/etc scratch disk and use spinning disks for everything else. You know, so the work goes faster and you can replace the SSD easily without needing to worry about any permanent data when (not if) it wears out.

        If only you could allocate just part of a SSD as cache for the spinning disk and use the rest of the SSD as normal… but last time I checked that kind of thing just wasn’t available on Windows normally. You might be able to make a high-end server RAID card do it though.

    • #1896660 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      I stick everything on C: (SSD) if there is enough room, then backup to D: (HDD) and copy from that to external regularly.
      If you don’t have enough room on C: then move large, low use, read only files (videos/music) to D:.

      cheers, Paul

    • #1896666 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      I stick everything on C: (SSD) if there is enough room, then backup to D: (HDD) and copy from that to external regularly.
      If you don’t have enough room on C: then move large, low use, read only files (videos/music) to D:.

      cheers, Paul

      I use the C drive (SSD) for the OS and the few apps that requires installation (<10% of my Software).
      D drive (HDD) holds data and the rest 90% of software, all portable.
      D drive also holds an bi-weekly Image copy of C drive (another Image copy of C & D is on an external HDD).

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 3 days ago by  Alex5723.
    • #1907095 Reply

      globalist
      AskWoody Lounger

      Sorry for my long-time non-response – I never received any requested notifications of responses to my post.

      The SSD is 256 GB; the disc drive is 2 TB.

      I use two One-Drive instances (as one is almost full) for my main storage, utilizing the capability to keep local copies on my most-used files.  [For example, my wife and I teach classes, and I keep these active folders on One-Drive with local copies on my laptop (since I use this for presentations) and one or both of the desktops.]

      I use outlook.com for my e-mail, calendar, contacts list, since it is nicely stored centrally and synced on the various pcs, plus cell phones and notebooks.

      My “productivity” software is Office 365.

      Beyond Photoshop Elements and Pinnacle, most of my other software is utility “stuff” like scanners, web file downloaders, MalwareBytes, ….

      Does this help make your recommendations more specific?

      Thanks again for your advice.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Setting up a new Win 10 Pro Workstation

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.