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  • Should I enable “Windows 10 Reputation-based protection”?

    Posted on Snoopdon Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Windows 10 version 2004 – May 2020 Update Should I enable “Windows 10 Reputation-based protection”?

    Topic Resolution: Resolved
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      • #2305542 Reply
        Snoopdon
        AskWoody Plus

        I have a Dell Inspiron desktop purchased in December of 2016 with Windows 10 Home. The current version is 2004. I have an Office 365 subscription and am using OneDrive to store all my files. The HD is 1TB (Properties shows 918GB) with 55.9 GB free. OneDrive contains 646GB.  This computer sometimes runs very slowly. I will make a separate post for that. Just now I launched Windows Security from the System Tray, planning to run a scan, suspecting malware and I saw a bang (!) on the Windows Security shield in the System Tray. It says I have not enabled Reputation-based protection. Please see screenshot. I am wondering if I should turn this on. I am very leery because a few months ago Windows suggested turning on “Ransomware protection”, which I did. About two weeks later Adobe Premiere Elements (video editing application) said it could not save files in its default location in Program Files. At first I didn’t suspect Ransomware protection. I contacted Adobe support and after a tech did a remote session involving a lot of experimental testing, including having me log on as Administrator, said my login profile was corrupt and I’d have to make a new one. I really didn’t want to have to do that so put it off for a few days and then I remembered enabling Ransomware protection. I disabled it and the problem with Premiere Element disappeared. Now I am very leery of enabling Windows security components without getting expert advice.

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      • #2305573 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        Ostensibly “Reputation-based protection” is a ‘good’ thing as it’s designed to prevent any ‘PUA/PUP‘ from tagging along with a legitimate app/prog’s installer.

        However, it all comes down to how well this additional protection is implemented and you already have experience of an earlier addition to Windows’ own security causing you a problem.

        How often do you download and install apps/programs from potentially dubious sources? For example, posts here on AskWoody often flag when downloads/installers start to carry unwanted passengers along for the ride.

        IMO it’s a difficult question to answer given that it’s such a personal preference based on your own usage and mindful of potential risk.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2305609 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        The HD is 1TB (Properties shows 918GB) with 55.9 GB free

        You have ~5% of free space on your HD. Start thinking about adding/replacing you HD for a larger Drive (a SSD drive will do great to your system).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2305610 Reply
        Snoopdon
        AskWoody Plus

        I usually only download/install apps from well-known developers like Adobe or apps that have shown to be trustworthy over time like Irfanview or have been recommended by trusted friends or trusted Youtube creators, for example Song Surgeon, Audacity, Amazing Slow Downer etc. For now I think I will hold off on enabling it and just be super careful to thoroughly vet any app I am thinking of installing.

        Thanks,
        Don

      • #2305611 Reply
        Snoopdon
        AskWoody Plus

        The HD is 1TB (Properties shows 918GB) with 55.9 GB free

        You have ~5% of free space on your HD. Start thinking about adding/replacing you HD for a larger Drive (a SSD drive will do great to your system).

        I didn’t think of adding another drive with another letter like D:\. I see Amazon has WD SSD drives for just over $100. If I move my Onedrive folder to the SSD will it still work ok?

      • #2305635 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        SSDs work just like HDDs, only much faster. Go for it!

        I’d clean up the disk first, there must be stuff you can junk.
        Try TreeSize free for a list of space hogs.

        When replacing an SSD with an HDD you must align the SSD. See this thread.

        cheers, Paul

        • #2305652 Reply
          PaulK
          AskWoody Lounger

          Macrium information for partition alignment is in the User Guide.
          Direct page online. And on pages 199-200 of the PDF.

      • #2305656 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        The HD is 1TB (Properties shows 918GB) with 55.9 GB free

        You have ~5% of free space on your HD. Start thinking about adding/replacing you HD for a larger Drive (a SSD drive will do great to your system).

        I didn’t think of adding another drive with another letter like D:\. I see Amazon has WD SSD drives for just over $100. If I move my Onedrive folder to the SSD will it still work ok?

        You put your Windows OS on the SSD not some data.
        Data should be reserved for the slow HDD.
        Take a full backup of your PC to an external USB HDD
        Remove the HDD.

        Install a NVMe SSD drive. Do a clean Windows install .
        Boot and check that everything works.
        Re-install your software.
        You can re-install the HDD format the drive and restore from backup only your data (no OS parts).

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
      • #2305663 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Data on an SSD is great, no need to have an extra disk – assuming you have space on the SSD.

        Unless your motherboard supports NVMe boot, do not use an NVMe. A plug-in SATA SSD is more than sufficient on older hardware.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2305817 Reply
        Zig
        AskWoody Plus

        Snoopdon,

        I’ve got to disagree with Paul here (that’s unusual), and agree with Alex:

        OS on SSD (C:\) (SSD may not need to be 1TB, though)

        Data on old HDD (D:\) or get a larger HDD (e.g., 4TB) and transfer all data to it.

        Agree with warnings about NVMe.

        Zig

         

      • #2307021 Reply
        FortneyJT
        AskWoody Plus

        Does anyone have any direct experience with “Reputation-based protection”?

      • #2307035 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Agree with warnings about NVMe.

        I use NVMe SSD drive (OS C:) in the last 10 years (with Windows 7 and now Windows 10) not a single hiccup, crash, lost data….
        NVMe SSD is up to 10x faster than SATA SSD.

      • #2307734 Reply
        snoopdon
        Guest

        Wow, this is a lot of great feedback. Sorry for not replying for a while.  Questions:

        1. I have no idea if my computer supports NVMe. How can I tell?
        2. What about this alignment spoken of by Paul T?
        3. I would probably go with a 512GB NVMe drive, just to be safe regarding space on the OS drive. I see the 512GB NVMe drives on Amazon are way less than $100 but I see they are cards with the connector on the end, not the long side like a traditional adapter card. I have one PCI-e x16 slot, which is shown with the video card installed in the service manual I downloaded from dell.com and two PCI-e slots. How to use these cards?
        4. I do not have the install media or install file for Windows 10 Home 64-bit. Can I download the installer  and activate it with my install key, which I found using the procedure shown at this web page.
        5. I agree with using the SSD as the OS drive, reformatting the SATA drive and putting data on it. As I mentioned, I store all my data in my OneDrive folder so it is backed up to the OneDrive cloud. I have 752GB of data. I have a Western Digital Elements 1TB external USB drive to which I can copy the OneDrive folder to copy back after reformatting the SATA drive. I prefer this method as it would be faster than downloading from the cloud and also because I already burned one of my two courtesy months to exceed my Comcast 1TB Internet file transfer limits before being charged. I did this when I initially installed OneDrive and uploaded my existing data about a year ago. Question is, how to copy the OneDrive folder back to the SATA drive after formatting it and register it as the OneDrive folder? With Dropbox this is easy but not sure how it works with OneDrive.
        6. Any other advice?

        Thanks,
        Don

      • #2307812 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Look up the model on the Dell site and it will tell you if NVMe is supported. Look for M2 disk support.
        My guess would be not supported – M2 is SSD only and is not generally included on machines with an HDD. The mount / connectors are completely different to SATA.

        Do not install an adapter for NVMe, you will not be able to boot from the disk and will lose any benefit from installing an SSD. Get a SATA SSD, like a Crucial MX500 1TB.

        Read the links to learn about alignment – you don’t really need to know what it is, just that you must do it.

        You can download install media from Heidoc.net or use Rufus.

        Having 700GB in the cloud is a complete headache. On a reinstall OneDrive will attempt to replicate it to your machine, leading to one large data bill.
        Hopefully someone else here will be able to guide you through that particular minefield.

        I suspect that cloning your HDD to your new SSD (boot from a cloning software disk/USB stick), then taking the HDD out and using the same connector for the SSD, will get you around any requirement to reinstall Windows or OneDrive.
        This is what I would attempt first.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2307930 Reply
        Snoopdon
        AskWoody Plus

        Paul,

        I’m ok with SATA so I will forget about using NVMe, but I don’t want to clone the existing drive to the new drive. I want a new, clean install of Windows on the SSD. My PC is about 4 years old and I know from when I was an IT tech (I retired in 2018) that after 4 years Windows accumulates a bunch of junk in the registry and slows down. We used to reimage PC’s routinely if they got this old and slowed down or if they got infected (unless we replaced them first).

        Regarding OneDrive, the whole 700GB is on my hard drive (see attachment). It is just backed up in the cloud. I plan to copy that folder to my external USB drive, reformat the existing HD, make it drive D:\ and copy the folder back to it. I have used Dropbox in the past and still have a small (I have a few free GB) Dropbox folder. I know that if I did this with a Dropbox folder I would only have to install the Dropbox app, right click on it and choose “use as Dropbox folder”. The Dropbox app would compare it to the copy stored in the Dropbox server and would see it was identical and would not copy anything in either direction. We used to do this for our users who had Dropbox on their computers when we replaced the computer. As you say, perhaps a OneDrive expert here can help with that and I can post a separate question for that.

      • #2308423 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        A new install on the SSD will do the alignment for you and reuse your Win10 license. Go for it.

        Seems you have plenty of OD experience, so the data won’t be an issue.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
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