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  • SSDs: Defragment and Optimize Drive app & the Task Scheduler app

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Windows 10 version 1909 – November 2019 Update SSDs: Defragment and Optimize Drive app & the Task Scheduler app

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      • #2315274
        WCHS
        AskWoody Plus

        I have been keeping track of the DEFRAGMENT and OPTIMIZE DRIVES (D&OD) app-report and the TASK SCHEDULER >Task Scheduler Library > Microsoft > Windows > Defrag (TS) app-report on my two machines, both with SSDs.

        On the newer one, in September D&OD was set for weekly optimization, but the # of run-days kept adding up until on Oct 4 the number was ’29 days since optimization’. However, at the same time, TS would report a new ‘Last run date’ every week. Then, on Oct 5, the D&OD run- count started over at ‘0’ and subsequently kept adding a day, until on Oct 21, the # of D&OD run-days was ’16’ (likely headed for ’29’ again) and as usual, TS continued to report a new ‘Last run date’ every week.

        I decided to set D&OD to monthly optimization to see what the results would be. D&OD kept increasing the days, (on Oct 22 it was ’17’), but TS reported the ‘Last run time’ to be ’11/30/1999’, apparently, a sign that TS was starting over with a default date and ‘The task has not been run yet (Ox41303)’; I say ‘apparently’, because D&OD had just been reset to monthly. D&OD, on the other hand, kept increasing the days until on Nov 16, it reached ’42 days’; TS still reported the ‘Last Run date’ to be ’11/30/1999′. This then-current date of Nov 16 was 27 days since the D&OD app had been reset to monthly on Oct 21.

        THENNNN on Nov 17, D&OD reported 0 run-days and the TS reported the ”Last run date” to be ’11/17/2020′, i.e. the same 0 days since the last run. Consequently, ever since Nov 17, the # of run- days in D&OD and the ‘Last run date’ in TS are in sync: specifically, on Nov 26, D&OD reported ‘9’ run-days since optimization and TS reported the “Last run date” to be 11/17/2020 (i.e. 9 days ago).

        On the older machine, the same thing is not happening, i.e. I do not see any syncing as of yet. To be specific: on Oct 1, D&OD was set to monthly and the TS ‘Last run date’ showed the default 11/30/1999 with the info that ‘The task has not been run yet (Ox41303)’. Then, on Oct 27, TS changed the “Last run date: to 10/27/2020, but D&OD kept adding on run-days. Today Nov 26, the # of D&OD run-days is ‘56’!

        Something doesn’t seem right here. If it were following the pattern of the newer machine, the D&OD run-days would have reached ‘27’ on Nov 22 and on Nov 23, the # of run-days would have restarted at ‘0’ and TS would have reported a ‘Last run date’ of ’11/23/2020′ (i.e., 0 days ago). However, the TS ‘Last run date’ is still ’10/27/2020′ (31 days past the current date of 11/26/2020)!

        I hope someone will be able to follow this and figure out how to fix the problem. To my mind, by now, the older machine should be behaving like the newer machine in that the D&OD # of run-days and the TS # of days beyond the ‘Last run date’ should be the same value.

        Summary:
        In the newer machine, the # of run-days is ‘9’ and the # of days beyond the ‘Last run date’ is ‘9’ – values are the same; the D&OD and the TS are in sync.
        In the older machine, the D&OD run-days is ‘56’ and the TS days beyond the ‘Last run date’ is ‘31’—values are not the same; D&OD and TS are not in sync.

        Shouldn’t D&OD run-days and the TS days beyond ‘Last run date’ be in sync by now on the older machine? If so, how do I achieve that?

      • #2315401
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Your SSD needs very little maintenance. If the optimization runs once every couple of months that will be plenty.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2315428
        CraigS26
        AskWoody Plus

        Your SSD needs very little maintenance. If the optimization runs once every couple of months that will be plenty. cheers, Paul

        I’m lost per my current belief that TRIM and SSD OPTIMIZE are the same?

        IF SSD TRIM is On —  does Optimize Last Run data for Task Scheduler matter? WCHS doesn’t mention an HDD as I have in a combo, so THAT alters the question if he does.

        W10 Pro 20H2 / Hm-Stdnt Ofce '16 C2R / HP Envy Desktop-Ethernet/ 12 GB / 256G SSD + 1 TB HDD / i5-8400 Coffee Lake/ GP=2 + FtrU=Semi-Annual + Feature Defer = 1 + QU=0

      • #2315429
        WCHS
        AskWoody Plus

        WCHS doesn’t mention an HDD

        I have no HDD, just an SSD only.

      • #2315437
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        The task is scheduled to analyze on a schedule and optimize drives as needed.  The last run date indicates the last time the drive was analyzed, not the last time it was optimized.

        When the count returns to zero, it indicates that the drive was optimized.  The count indicates the number of days since the last optimization, and optimization only occurs when the algorithm determines optimization is necessary.

        Unless you use the two machine in exactly identical ways, don’t expect the counts to match.  Whether you set the task for weekly or monthly is of no real consequence, optimization does not occur on a schedule, only analysis occurs on a schedule.

         

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2315452
          WCHS
          AskWoody Plus

          Unless you use the two machine in exactly identical ways, don’t expect the counts to match.

          I don’t expect the counts to match when comparing the two machines. But, I do expect the counts in the two apps on one machine to match, though.

          As reported in #2315274, the two counts (for D&OD and for the Task Scheduler) DO match on the newer machine.

          I spoke too soon for the older machine. I discovered today that yesterday, it had righted itself. Today (Nov 28, 11:28 am), D&OD says 0 days since last run on Nov 27 at 1:22 pm. And the Task Scheduler says that the ‘Last run date’ was Nov 27 at 1:55:01 PM, which on Nov 27 was 0 days ago. So, now on the older machine, the # of run-days in D&OD and the # of days beyond the ‘Last run date’ reported in the Task Scheduler agree, as well — i.e., the two reports/counts (one from D&OD and the other from the Task Scheduler) on the older machine are now in sync with one another, just like the two reports/counts on the newer machine have, for quite some time, been in sync with one another. The values are different from machine to machine (10 days vs 0 days), but I expect that, since they are different machines.

          …optimization does not occur on a schedule…

          I don’t understand why you say this. The D&OD app allows one to set an optimization schedule, either weekly or monthly. In fact, the header for this in the app says “Scheduled Optimizations

          • #2315465
            anonymous
            Guest

            @WCHS

            What @bbearren is saying is that the disk optimization task first analyzes the drive to see if it even needs to be optimized in the first place. If the analysis shows that the drive needs to be optimized, then it gets optimized. If the analysis shows that optimization is not needed, then the task ends, end of story.

            • #2315472
              WCHS
              AskWoody Plus

              disk optimization task first analyzes

              By “disk optimization task” are you referring to the Task Scheduler?
              Its actions must be connected in some way to the info that is reported in the D&OD (Defragment and Optimize Drive) app.

              Can you explain in what way they are connected? Something along the lines of “if the Task Scheduler activates (does a new optimization), then it passes this info onto the D&OD app, which keeps track of the # of days since the last optimization” Or alternatively, the D&OD looks at the info in the Task Scheduler to calculate how many days it has been since the last optimization run”??

            • #2315466
              anonymous
              Guest

              So, it is definitely possible for the task to run without actually optimizing the drive in question.

      • #2315470
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        In fact, the header for this in the app says “Scheduled Optimizations”

        The header’s description doesn’t matter. Just like @bbearren said. Windows analyzes first and optimize if needed. Your schedule can’t force optimization.
        Optimize drive says : Last Analyzed OR Optimized.

        You have the Optimize button to manually optimize your drives.

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Alex5723.
        • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Alex5723.
        Attachments:
        • #2315478
          WCHS
          AskWoody Plus

          My Defragment and Optimize Drive app has a different screen (version 1909). Says neither “Last analyzed” nor “Last optimized” and doesn’t say “Last analyzed or optimized”. It says “Last run”.

          last-run

          Attachments:
          • #2315498
            Alex5723
            AskWoody Plus

            Can’t remember the screen on 1909. I am now on 20H2.
            Mine also stated 13 days since last reTrim (optimized)

      • #2315508
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        A picture is worth a thousand words, or so it is said.  I booted into the B side of my desktop which is running 2004.  Here is a snip of the Defrag and Optimize UI taken soon after I signed in.

        Defrag-and-Optimize

        It’s been a while since I was on this side, as you might be able to ascertain.  Next I opened Task Scheduler and manually ran the task (last run had been 11-2-2020).  Then I made another snip while it was doing its thing.

        Optimizing

        What is scheduled is the analyzing part.  After analysis, optimization (retrim) is undertaken if the algorithm determines it to be necessary.  Notice the wording at the bottom of the dialog box; “Drives are being analyzed on a scheduled cadence and optimized as needed.”

        The analysis is scheduled.  The optimization is as needed.  The optimization does follow the analysis, hence it also follows the analysis schedule, but the optimization itself is not scheduled, it is only undertaken as needed.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

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        • #2315536
          WCHS
          AskWoody Plus

          To: @bbearren — As you say:

          A picture is worth a thousand words,

          Can you post a snip of the what the first screen looks like now, after you optimized.
          Can you also post a snip of what the Task Scheduler>Task Scheduler Library > Microsoft > Windows > Defrag looks like now?

          • #2315579
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            Can you post a snip of the what the first screen looks like now, after you optimized.

            Optimize-Drives

            Can you also post a snip of what the Task Scheduler>Task Scheduler Library > Microsoft > Windows > Defrag looks like now?

            Last-Run

             

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

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            2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2315538
          WCHS
          AskWoody Plus

          Next I opened Task Scheduler and manually ran the task (last run had been 11-2-2020).

          Is this the same as clicking on the button that says “Optimize”?

          Like your 2004 screen, I also have an “Analyze” button (1909), but it is also, like your 2004 screen, greyed out? Why is it greyed out?

          • #2315583
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            Is this the same as clicking on the button that says “Optimize”?

            No, with the Defrag task highlighted,  I clicked the “Run” button in the right-hand pane of Task Scheduler.

            Run

            Why is it greyed out?

            It’s greyed out because “Analyze” is being handled by Task Scheduler.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

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            2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2315539
          WCHS
          AskWoody Plus

          Notice the wording at the bottom of the dialog box; “Drives are being analyzed on a scheduled cadence and optimized as needed.”

          My 1909 screen says “Drives are being optimized automatically”. See #2315478 Is this a difference between 1909 and 2004? Or is it a difference due to your having multiple drives and my having only one drive? Or is the difference due to some switch that has been set somewhere?

          • #2315549
            Bob99
            AskWoody Plus

            @kykaren (WCHS)-

            The difference in the wording in the windows between your machine and @bbearren ‘s is simply the difference in the window’s wording between W10 version 1909 (what you’re on) and W10 versions 2004 AND 20H2 (what @bbearren is on).

            For version 2004, Microsoft simply decided to change the wording in certain places within the window, that’s all.

            My window for that application is worded identically to @bbearren ‘s, and I’m on 2004 with a single SSD that isn’t partioned in any way.

            The task that’s listed in Task Scheduler runs the Defragment/Optimize app, the very same one you can manually invoke the way you already have.

            However, the difference is that when Task Scheduler runs it, the app first analyzes the SSD to see if it needs to be optimized. If the analysis shows it doesn’t need to be optimized, the task ends. This is where you will see a difference between the Task Scheduler’s “last run” date and the drive’s Last Optimized date shown in the Defrag/Optimize window: The task ran, but DID NOT optimize the SSD, because it wasn’t needed, so the task has indeed run, but the SSD wasn’t optimized because optimization wasn’t needed.

            When the Task Scheduler runs the app and the analysis shows the SSD needs to be optimized, the app then optimizes it and the task ends. This is where the date last run for the task and the date last optimized for the drive will match.

            I hope this helps clear things up for you with regards to this handy feature of Windows 10.

            By the way, my window for defrag/optimize also shows the “Analyze” option button on the window to be greyed out/unavailable just like in your window and @bbearren ‘s, but I have no idea why. I don’t have the defrag/optimize task scheduled, but that’s not why, because bbearren does have the task scheduled but the “Analyze” option is still greyed out for him, as it is for you and me. Therefore, the greyed out “Analyze” button may be for another topic/thread.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2315576
              WCHS
              AskWoody Plus

              However, the difference is that when Task Scheduler runs it, the app first analyzes the SSD to see if it needs to be optimized.

              This paragraph and the one following are exactly what I needed to clear things up.

              Does “if it needs to be optimized” mean “it if is too fragmented”? although I have read that one does not say that an SSD drive is fragmented, but let’s use the term anyway, for now, since one of bbearren’s screens for a SSD shows % defragmented.

              I remember in the days of DOS when a screen would come up that showed segments of a disk being moved around so that sections of a file would end up being contiguous rather than scattered about and in the end all of the used segments were at the top and all of the unused segments would be at the bottom. That is literal defragmentation where there’s a lot of reading and rewriting, right – like musical chairs?

              So, what happens with an SSD – maybe addresses are reconfigured in some kind of address table, rather than segments have been actually moved from one place to another?

              • #2315586
                bbearren
                AskWoody MVP

                This is likely more than you want to know, but it will help you understand what goes on with a SSD.

                “One of the functional limitations of SSDs is while they can read and write data very quickly to an empty drive, overwriting data is much slower. This is because while SSDs read data at the page level (meaning from individual rows within the NAND memory grid) and can write at the page level, assuming surrounding cells are empty, they can only erase data at the block level. This is because the act of erasing NAND flash requires a high amount of voltage. While you can theoretically erase NAND at the page level, the amount of voltage required stresses the individual cells around the cells that are being re-written. Erasing data at the block level helps mitigate this problem.

                The only way for an SSD to update an existing page is to copy the contents of the entire block into memory, erase the block, and then write the contents of the old block + the updated page. If the drive is full and there are no empty pages available, the SSD must first scan for blocks that are marked for deletion but that haven’t been deleted yet, erase them, and then write the data to the now-erased page. This is why SSDs can become slower as they age — a mostly-empty drive is full of blocks that can be written immediately, a mostly-full drive is more likely to be forced through the entire program/erase sequence.”

                And yes, a SSD can also get fragmented, because there is an upper limit to the number of segments a file can have, as well as the overhead of gathering all those individual pages from all over the SSD can slow performance, as they must be read in sequence.

                Contiguous files can be read more quickly, both from HDD’s and SSD’s as well.  It’s a much smaller hit on an SSD, but a hit nonetheless.  And if the number of segments gets too large, addressing becomes an issue, as well.  So Windows will occasionally defrag an SSD.

                Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
                "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
                "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

                3 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2315587
                WCHS
                AskWoody Plus

                This is likely more than you want to know, …

                Not at all. Thanks for the link.

        • #2315756
          WCHS
          AskWoody Plus

          The analysis is scheduled. The optimization is as needed. The optimization does follow the analysis, hence it also follows the analysis schedule, but the optimization itself is not scheduled, it is only undertaken as needed.

          Alright then, when the D&OD app says “Needs optimization (37 days since last retrim)”, in your case, or “Needs optimization (53 days since last run)” in my case, that must not mean that the Task Scheduler’s analysis has determined that optimization/re-trimming is needed. I say this for two reasons: 1) optimization/re-trimming didn’t happen at that point; and 2) the Task Scheduler isn’t scheduled yet to do its monthly analysis (it has four more days to go, in my case).

          But, when the four days were up and the Task Scheduler kicked in to do its monthly analysis, it evidently determined that optimization was the next step. So, did the Task Scheduler tell the D&OD to optimize? Or did the Task Scheduler do the optimization itself and let the D&OD app know that it had done it? Somehow, although D&OD couldn’t/can’t do the analysis, which is the first step, afterwards, when the analysis was done, it knew either to optimize or that optimizing had been done, because it changed its message to “OK (0 days since last run”.

          My conclusion: even though D&OD knows that optimization is needed and even counts the days in which it has been needed, it has to wait until the Task Scheduler is scheduled to do its analysis before it can happen. If the TS analysis says “optimize”, optimization happens and D&OD resets its count. If the TS analysis says “not yet”, optimization doesn’t happen, and D&OD keeps counting.

          If this is the way it works, it helps to explain the meaning of D&OD’s report that “Optimization is needed” — i.e., it knows it but it can’t do anything about it until the Task Scheduler does its analysis at its appointed time.

          • #2315772
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            My conclusion: even though D&OD knows that optimization is needed and even counts the days in which it has been needed, it has to wait until the Task Scheduler is scheduled to do its analysis before it can happen. If the TS analysis says “optimize”, optimization happens and D&OD resets its count. If the TS analysis says “not yet”, optimization doesn’t happen, and D&OD keeps counting.

            If this is the way it works, it helps to explain the meaning of D&OD’s report that “Optimization is needed” — i.e., it knows it but it can’t do anything about it until the Task Scheduler does its analysis at its appointed time.

            I’m inclined to agree with your assessment.  As the images in my previous posts suggest, when I opened Task Scheduler, highlighted D&OD and clicked Run in the lower right pane, the task did indeed optimize the drives.  Had I been more patient and let Task Scheduler follow its schedule, I’m sure the results would have been the same; the drives would have been optimized on the next run.

            Windows Defrag.exe lets a HDD get quite fragmented before it will actually run Defrag, and I think that with SSD’s, it also lets them get quite in need of optimization before it will actually optimize.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by bbearren.
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          • #2315881
            WCHS
            AskWoody Plus

            If this is the way it works, it helps to explain the meaning of D&OD’s report that “Optimization is needed” — i.e., it knows it but it can’t do anything about it until the Task Scheduler does its analysis at its appointed time.

            And I should add:
            And in D&OD’s message that “optimization is needed”, it is also saying “D&OD can’t do anything about it because TS has to do its analysis first at its appointed time but you, the user, CAN do something about it by clicking the Optimize button.”

            I say this if clicking the “Optimize” button in D&OD causes the same thing to happen as a) clicking “Run” in the Task Scheduler or b) the Task Scheduler kicking in to run on its own at its appointed time.

            Does Analysis always happen before Optimization? Or does Analysis only happen if TS runs on its own at its appointed time?

      • #2315604
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I’m lost per my current belief that TRIM and SSD OPTIMIZE are the same?

        They are not the same.
        TRIM is a standard SSD function run just after a file erase – when the drive is less busy.
        Optimize is a task to check for problems that build up over time – fragmentation etc.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2315689
          bbearren
          AskWoody MVP

          CraigS26 wrote: I’m lost per my current belief that TRIM and SSD OPTIMIZE are the same?

          They are not the same. TRIM is a standard SSD function run just after a file erase – when the drive is less busy. Optimize is a task to check for problems that build up over time – fragmentation etc.

          Not quite.  TRIM is an OS command to the SSD; the SSD does Active Garbage Collection based on the TRIM command from the OS.

          Technically, TRIM is a command for the ATA interface. The command is different for other interfaces, and goes by different names in different operating systems, but the action is usually referred to as “Trim”. Trim tells your solid state drive which pieces of data can be erased. No matter what name it goes by, Trim works with Active Garbage Collection to clean up and organize your solid state drive. As you use your drive, changing and deleting information, the SSD needs to make sure that invalid information is deleted from the drive and that there is available space for new information to be written. Trim is beneficial, but not mandatory. Because some operating systems do not support Trim, SSD manufacturers design, create, and test their drives assuming that Trim will not be used.”

          “The Trim command tells the SSD that specific areas contain data that is no longer in use. From the user’s perspective, this data has been deleted from a document. Because of the way solid state drives read and write information, the data is not deleted from the drive at the user’s command. Instead, the area of the SSD that contains the data is marked as no longer used. The Trim command tells the drive that the data can be removed. The next time the computer is idle, Active Garbage Collection will delete the data.”

          “How Active Garbage Collection works

          Flash memory, which is what SSDs are made of, cannot overwrite existing data the way a hard disk drive can. Instead, solid state drives need to erase the now invalid data. The problem is that a larger unit of the memory, a block, must be erased before a smaller unit, a page, can be written. For example, if there are four pages with data in an otherwise empty block and three pages of data are deleted, the remaining page of data must be written to a new block, then all four pages in the old block can be deleted, freeing them up to be rewritten in the future.

          If the drive were to not go through this process of moving valid information so that invalid information can be deleted, and instead, just keep writing new information to new pages, eventually it would fill up with data, some of it no longer valid. To prevent this, Active Garbage collection goes through the disk and moves each page of valid data to a page in another block so the block with invalid data, which has been identified with Trim, can be cleaned out.”

          Also, if one highlights a drive and selects “Optimize” in the “Optimize Drives” UI, that operation is called by Windows (and can be seen as) “retrim” as it is being performed.

          Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
          "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
          "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2315637
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m lost per my current belief that TRIM and SSD OPTIMIZE are the same?

        They are not the same.
        TRIM is a standard SSD function run just after a file erase – when the drive is less busy.
        Optimize is a task to check for problems that build up over time – fragmentation etc.

        cheers, Paul

        Yet Microsoft uses ‘retrim’ and not ‘optimize’ in ‘Optimize Drives’ display.

        • #2315677
          Bob99
          Guest

          Yet Microsoft uses ‘retrim’ and not ‘optimize’ in ‘Optimize Drives’ display.

          I beg to differ. I’m on Win 10 Pro x64 version 2004 fully updated to include the November updates and my Defragment/Optimize drives window only shows Analyze (which is greyed out) and Optimize as choices for what to do with my drive which is an SSD. There is no mention of any kind about “retrim” anywhere in the window.

          • #2315691
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            … my Defragment/Optimize drives window only shows Analyze (which is greyed out) and Optimize as choices for what to do with my drive which is an SSD.

            If you highlight a SSD drive and click on “Optimize”, you’ll see under “Current status” progress being measured in percentage and the word “retrim” used to describe what is being performed.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2315712
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I beg to differ.

        Just look at the screen shots in posts above. The action performed was ‘retrim’.

      • #2315725
        Bob99
        Guest

        @bbearren & @Alex5723

        “I see”, said the blind man as he took out his hammer and saw!

        I do suppose, though, if we wanted to run an analysis-only on a drive (and see the results for ourselves), we could do it from an elevated command prompt using the /A switch after the defrag command, right?

      • #2315760
        kiwisolutionz
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’m not sure if I missed it but are you using Windows apps to do this work or do you use the software that comes with the SSD? I never trust Windows for any maintenance but I do use the app for my SSD (Storage Executive: Crucial) and stay with their recommends. I’ve also learnt to keep the SSD loaded only with files needed and my external drives hold all the heavier files because SSD’s do slow down on performance when they start getting loaded to max levels f.y.i, cheers all ; >)

        If there is magic on this earth ... it's in the water.

        • #2315763
          bbearren
          AskWoody MVP

          I’m not sure if I missed it but are you using Windows apps to do this work or do you use the software that comes with the SSD?

          I have six Samsung SSD’s.  I have Samsung Magician installed, but it defers to Windows to handle optimization, and Windows handles it quite nicely, no issues.

          Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
          "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
          "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        • #2315822
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          SSD’s do slow down on performance when they start getting loaded to max levels

          There is no slowdown until you have so little space left that TRIM can’t clear the data as fast as you write it. I suspect that is around 10GB free, allowing for RAM to disk swapping, but I have not done the tests.

          cheers, Paul

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    Reply To: SSDs: Defragment and Optimize Drive app & the Task Scheduler app

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