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  • Steven Sinofsky : Apple’s Long Journey to the M1 Pro Chip

    Home » Forums » AskWoody support » Non-Windows operating systems » macOS » Steven Sinofsky : Apple’s Long Journey to the M1 Pro Chip

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    #2398092

    https://medium.learningbyshipping.com/apples-long-journey-to-the-m1-pro-chip-250309905358

    This twitter thread explores the journey from the original Mac to today’s M1 Pro-based MacBook and the history behind such a mind-blowing innovation.

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    • #2398301

      Excellent. It’s one POV, a close view at that. Feels right.

      Gonna start pricing Apple stuff and planning the move. Will have it done by 2025. MS is not my friend, or preferred vendor, any longer. That I am sure of.

      We’ll see if Apple is a trust worthy replacement. Lots of smart folks think so.

      I’ll begin with my own personal iPhone. I have a work-issued iPhone now. I like it better than the Android I started with.

      But can I make the jump to an Apple laptop? I feel exactly as I did 55 years ago standing out on the end of the diving board at the hotel swimming pool. Dad is in the water below the end of the board telling me to trust him. “Jump! You’ll love it!” he implored. He totally missed me, on purpose. But he was right – I did love it.

      • #2398305

        If you can handle a phone, you can handle the laptop.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        • #2398306

          Not necessarily. The workload is different.

          The phone is for…well…phone calls. Let’s be generous – Communication. (surfing without a great deal of interaction – primarily viewing) The phone is not a great platform for doing work. It’s a supporting actor, not the lead.

          The laptop is not for communication – hardly even a little. Though that may change.

          The laptop is for work – word processing, spread sheeting, photoshopping, pdf’ing, surfing (with the capability to interact with webpages much more readily than with a phone), and other computing (not communication) oriented tasks.

          I’m not so quick to accept your assertion, but I do approve the sentiment.

          • #2398333

            I’m thinking in terms of the basics.  The gear = settings.  Icons are for launching applications just like Windows.  Grab my  sister’s ipad with the keyboard and you can write a word doc.  Spreadsheets are a bit harder on an ipad, but on the Mac, just launch numbers app.  Honestly my biggest issue?  When I get Quickbooks files/numbers files/ stuff FROM a person on a Mac and I need to convert them to work in my Windows world.

            Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          • #2398338

            Anonymous #2398306 , I disagree: a computer, these days, be it a Mac, or a Windows PC, or a Linux one, is excellent for asynchronous communication via email, as well as for real-time teleconferencing, for people who do cooperative work with partners sometimes in different continents, as in my own case. One can write a lot of information on an email, adding links to Web sites with more information, or attaching the PDF of a relevant publication, for example, while using a full keyboard that has been designed for actually writing anything, from a one-word message (“Thanks!”) to a 950-page novel.

            Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

            MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
            Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
            Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      • #2398322

        Anonymous #2398301 : If you can handle a Windows PC, you can handle a Mac. There is little difference in the user interface, the desktop, folders, etc. Much of the things one has to set up or do under the hood, may  have different names and be in different places, but they do the same things. The question is finding them. There some external help, of the kinds I pass to mention, would probably put you on the right track.

        macOS is mostly a form of UNIX, so if one is familiar with UNIX, Linux, FreeBSD, etc. and knows how to use the command line with any of these, so much the better, because one is immediately fluent in macOS-speak. But this is not at all essential, just an added helpful thing to know: to the Mac uninitiated but familiar with Linux, Unix, etc., the macOS command line language is not a mystery command line language, like Windows’. (I know some will take exception to this last observation: I don’t mind.)

        You might need to get a cheat sheet like one of those sold at e.g. Amazon, for keyboard shortcuts, etc.

        There are also books on macOS, accessibly written. I bought two of those when I bought my current Mac, as I had not worked with a Mac for more than two decades previously. But I rarely have had the need to use them.

        There is plenty of information online, and if you are any good at googling for things you need to know you’ll find some decent advice that way.

        You can always ask here at AskWoody for things you can’t figure out otherwise. And there is already plenty of information here in Forums/AskWoody Support/non-Windows operating systems/macOS.

        It will take some learning and practicing, but nothing you might never have done before, and it will be gradual. Keep your Windows machine in good working order during the transition, so you can fall back on it if necessary. Or to run software you need to use and is only available for Windows.

        While there are Macs with Intel central processor units (CPUs) still being made and sold, the current direction at Apple is to emphasize the new generation of Macs, with Apple’s customized ARM RISC CPUs, for reasons of greater speed and power economy, including longer times running on battery alone, in the case of laptops.

        Developers of applications will have to follow Apple’s hardware design trend. So the support for anything that runs on Macs with Intel CPUs, even new ones, will drop over time. As is likely, looking into my dirty and cracked crystal ball, to drop Apple’s support for Intel Macs and their operating systems, whether these are new machines or not, faster than usual.

        If I were to buy a new Mac now, I will buy one with the ARM-type CPU, known generically as “Silicon Macs.” I would not worry too much about price, because here you really get what you pay for. And I would buy a Mac with the biggest capacity SSD on offer, because the last thing I would like to happen is that it runs out of enough mass storage capacity before it comes the day when the computer must be retired an replaced with a new one, maybe 6 – 8 years from the day it was shipped fresh from Apple in its neat little, or not so little, box.

        For backups you’ll need an external drive, HD or SSD, that I strongly advice have four TB of capacity, if you are buying for the long haul, where to do the backups using the macOS-included “Time Machine” application.

        Macs come with built-in strong defenses in their software against malware, but these might not be always up to date, so it is advisable to get a good real-time antivirus and outward facing firewall. Intego is a company that has been providing this sort of thing to Apple users for many years and is probably one of the best bets. The AV is called VirusBarrier and the firewall is called Net Barrier (they are sold together, as a package), and they do not conflict with anything else in the Mac, in my own experience. I run VirusBarrier in real time, constantly scanning for bugs, and also on demand once a day, when I am ending the day’s session, as well as Malwarebytes, free version, that runs only on demand, so it does not get tangled up with the real-time scanning Intego anti virus. Intego also sells an application called “Washing Machine” that cleans up all the debris collected when Web surfing, etc, and is quite a busy little thing that gets rid of surprising amounts of garbage.

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      • #2398520

        I think everything I wanted to say has already been said above, but I myself was a long-time Windows user who made the switch to Mac, and then later switched from Android to iOS. Is it perfect? No. Am I satisfied with it? Yes. The bonus I have now is that I can use a Windows, Mac, Android, and iOS device and know my way around all four systems. It’s a good opportunity to learn something new—and really, it isn’t hard to learn once you make it your daily driver and exercise your brain. Don’t let your first day of figuring things out discourage you.

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