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  • Switch from Windows to Mac

    Home Forums AskWoody support Non-Windows operating systems macOS Switch from Windows to Mac

    • This topic has 38 replies, 9 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago.
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      • #2364847
        dmt_3904
        AskWoody Plus

        I have been a lifelong Windows user. I use an iPhone and an iPad.  I want to switch to a Mac computer.  I’ve seen this article by PK https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/2000021-ipad-guide-for-windows-users-wanting-to-switch/

        which is very helpful for the iPad.  But, I thought there was a guide on askwoody for those of us who want to make the switch from windows to Mac, is there?  If not, I can do an Internet search.

        I briefly used a Mac laptop when working at a summer camp and didn’t find that switch to disruptive.  But there are lots of things I need to think about when making the cut – these were just a few of my thoughts, I’ve only started researching.  I’m not asking here for you to answer them – they are just my initial thoughts.  I would welcome any feedback you have 😁 as I’m  sure there are many things I haven’t even thought of yet.

        • Will I be able to use Dell screen or must I purchase a new one? I like the iMac, but want a laptop for portability. But need larger screen.
        • Research each program/app to ensure it will run on Mac. Will Espon print work on Mac?
        • Macrium backup – use that? Or timeline? What is apple’s machine backup protocol
        • Check Firefox and duckduck go browsers
        • Malwarebytes – ? will i Need it? Will I need antivirus? What are the experts in the field doing?
        • Carbonite backup – Move to Mac? Will they apply what I’ve paid? Or will I have to purchase a new subscription?
        • How to manage/keep Windows laptop? Do not connect to the internet. Keep for files/history.  Or connect periodically to update?
        • This topic was modified 1 month ago by dmt_3904.
        • This topic was modified 1 month ago by dmt_3904.
        • This topic was modified 1 month ago by dmt_3904.
        • This topic was modified 1 month ago by dmt_3904.
      • #2364857
        PKCano
        Manager

        A long time ago, I did several Topics on MacOS/Win. If you go to the Mac Forum and start at the oldest Topics, you will find them. Page 26/27 on my FireFox.

        I have been a Mac user since 2011. My Win installations are now run on Parallels Desktop for Mac VMs. However, the catch here is that at this time it has to be an Intel Mac. Win VMs aren’t there yet for the new M1 chips.

        There is a recent Topic in the Mac Forum on Apps that run on both Intel and Mac (Universal Apps). You might look through that list. I would give you mine, but my Macs are Intel and you will probably buy an M1 Mac. For Intel Macs, just about everything I used on Win also has a Mac-based app. FireFox, Thunderbird, Malwarebytes, Office, VLC, CCleaner, TrendMicro, etc For backup, you will have to use TimeMachine or a MacOS based backup. I don’t think Macrium makes a Mac-compatible version.

        Your display should work – given the correct dongle. Mac laptops don’t have much choice of ports, but some of the iMacs have more selection. I am using HP and Brother printers without problems – my Macs have bee real good about automatically installing software/drivers that work if I don’t have OEM’s.

        I love my Macs. Don’t have to fight the OS!!!! They just work.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2364879
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I bought my Mac, back in 2017, on-line, directly from Apple. You can configure this way the Mac as you would like to buy it and whether it is a laptop or a desktop, as far as the options available go. First it is a good idea to read on topics already discussed here in “Forums/Non-Windows Operating systems/macOS” and also to read about them on the Web. After doing this for a while, one can get a good idea of what to look for when buying one.

        As to learning to use one after buying it, there are books about it, both on using it and on the operating system, originally called OS X and more recently macOS. I have also learned quite a bit about mine by googling for answers to questions I need a quick answer to. When one buys the Mac, it comes with one year of direct user support on line from Apple and the option to buy extended support for up to three years, if I remember correctly.

        For a Mac, as with any PC, if it has no problems out of the box and stays so for a month or two, probably you got yourself a computer for many years to come, if you treat it well. In my case, I have used Apple user support only twice, in the first two month after buying mine, near five years ago, and have never seen the inside of an Apple shop to have some repair made to it.

        Learning to use a Mac is easy, I believe it’s so because it was for me, coming from Windows. But one has to learn new things, such as keyboard shortcuts, how to use some invaluably handy applications that come pre-installed with all Macs, such are the (to me at least) “Text” (a simple, but not too simple, text editor) and “Preview” (looking at pictures, working with documents, e.g. PDF). For that, there are some books and cheat sheets, but also plenty online, in tutorials at Websites and on YouTube. And, of course, much already written about it, mainly in the AskWoody’s the Mac’s Forum — and people will explain things if one asks. If someone has experience using Linux or UNIX, FreeBSD, etc. then the “Terminal” application that comes with a Mac is the portal to the macOS command line and, therefore, a valuable one to learn more about, as macOS is very similar to Linux, and many applications for Linux run on macs. The default shell is “Bash”, same statements, only some with little quirks peculiar to Apple. Googling about those has always got me informed and how to deal with those.

        At present Apple is making Macs with both Intel and newer Apple M1 processors. They are quite different chips and those applications meant for one would not run on machines with the other, directly that is. As PKCano has already explained, most familiar and widely used applications (I must add) are “universal”, because you get and install them in pairs: software for Intel and software for M1 (this is invisible to you, you just install “the app” without being concerned about it actually being two installations). Applications meant only for  Intel processors can be run on M1 machines trough a translator program called “Rosetta 2” (Apple changed, much earlier on, from PowerPC processors to Intel and used  to help people switch to the then new Macs, the original “Rosetta.”) So this has been done before and I understand Apple has done a good job, both then and now. The only major issue, for some users, is that using Rosetta slows down execution, but mostly for those who need the highest possible speed for playing computer games and such like.

        Macs stay fully supported for five years, both software and hardware, and hardware for seven **counting from the date when Apple stopped selling them, not from when new models were first introduced after one buys one’s Mac.** As to when to update one’s Mac to a new version of macOS (major upgrade, similar to going from Windows 7 to Windows 10), there is a new one coming out every year, around October, but one can keep the version now on one’s Mac for up to three such major releases and yours, if you don’t chose to upgrade yet, will still be fully supported. After five years of Apple stopping the sale of machines of a given model, while fully supporting these only for that long, my understanding is that Apple, same as Microsoft, will release security updates now and then for older Macs.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2364889
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        How to switch from PC to Mac, and what you need to know

        The article covers topics like : Hardware, Software, data migrations types and tools..

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2364910
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        Here’s a bit of a contrarian point of view from some of what’s been expressed.

        I have 2 Macs, an iMAC and a MacBook Air, both with the same up to date Catalina OS and very similar software, and both from June 2017. The iMAC is a slug, sometimes to the point of irritation. Lots of spinning beach balls and painfully slow security updates (which tend to be quite large – around 1.5 GB for an update and maybe even 12 GB for an upgrade tp Big Sur). I think the sluggishness comes from the spinning hard drive, which is the main difference between the iMAC and Air. I will never get another Mac unless it has an SSD. I haven’t checked the specs on new Macs in a while so I don’t know which come with/without spinning HDs.

        I think sometimes Apple gets a bit too carried away with form over function. An example is what PKCano mentioned above about lack of ports. My iMAC has plenty of ports but the Air is marginal, and I think the new Macs may only have one(!), so you’ll probably need some kind of dock (an extra expense). Another example is that the Air is almost too thin. It looks sleek but the cover is harder to open than a typical PC laptop and it’s also a bit harder to pick up from a flat surface. It’s form over function again. Some of the software relies too heavily on icons instead of menus. Photobooth is an example. There are some things that apparently can’t be done from a pull down menu. Once you learn that clicking on an unlabeled icon is required to do what you want it’s OK, but to me it’s form over function yet again.

        I initially bought the Macs because dealing with Windows updates/patches was just getting too complicated and stressful, and because I felt I could no longer trust Microsoft as far as I could throw them. (Windows 10 trying to force itself on my Win 7 machine without my permission, blue and black screens on patching, etc.) I wanted something that just works. Well, to a large extent I got that, although it seems that in the last year or so there have been a few offered updates that have been pulled with little/no explanation. then offered again, and I once did get hit with some sort of patch problem (an interplay between a Safari and security update that turned my Air into a slug, although that was fixed when Apple recognized the problem and offered a new patch).

        So, would I get another Mac? Yes but it would need an SSD, and it will not be my only computer. I’ve come to realize that for me, there simply is no ideal Operating system or hardware, I’ll continue with a Mac and also with my Linux Mint computers. The thought of getting a Win 10 computer almost makes me physically sick, but I may be forced into that as well.

        A couple of final thoughts. Be prepared to spend money on a Mac! A lot of this is subjective so what I think may or may not be relevant to you and your own personal preferences. If you can, see if you can try a Mac out for a week to see how it goes. You might also check out Apple’s refurbished Macs, which are cheaper and refurbished by Apple. My Air is a refurbished model from Apple and I’ve had zero hardware trouble with it.

        Hope this helps, and good luck!

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2364936
          dmt_3904
          AskWoody Plus

          Yes all very helpful info,  especially re: SSD.

        • #2365063
          7ProSP1
          AskWoody Lounger

          You might also check out Apple’s refurbished Macs, which are cheaper and refurbished by Apple.

          I completely agree with this suggestion. You can potentially save yourself hundreds of dollars depending on the model you ultimately decide on by going this route. The warranty on a refurbished unit is the exact same as on a new one and you are also able to purchase AppleCare for another three years of coverage on it too if you’re so inclined.

          • #2365065
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            By the Way, if someone decides to go “refurbished” I would definitely recommend buying (*) a mid-2015 Mac, such as my own laptop MacBook Pro, or the desktop iMac of that vintage. The reason for this? That they came with most of the usually necessary ports (except for Ethernet: needs a dongle for that one), including: two Thunderbolt 2 ports (up to 20 Gbps), two USB 3 ports (up to 5 Gbps), HDMI port, 3.5 mm headphone jack and an SDXC card slot. They also have a good and reliable and sensitive to the touch “scissor keys” keyboard, later replaced with the much inferior “butterfly keys” one, recently replaced back with the previous, good one. An they still have function keys at the top row of the keyboard, later replaced with a fancy touch strip that many dislike, myself included. In fact, I have seen people declare the mid-2015 models as “the best Macs ever.” I would not go that far, because I would not know which Macs were the best ever, but, for what’s worth, that sounds about right to me.

            (*) There are two issues of some concern here; one would be the end of full software support from Apple. If Apple is selling the refurbished computers itself, is it providing their buyers with a longer period of support than to those of us that bought ours new from an authorized shop, or online from Apple directly? And how about user support for the first year, as those buying new get? Some answers here:

            https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/where-to-buy-second-hand-mac/

            https://discussions.apple.com/thread/8036565

            This article/obituary in praise of the mid-2015 Mac laptop (like mine) was written on July 12 2018, when Apple stopped selling the mid-2015 MacBook Pro laptops:

            https://mashable.com/article/rip-2015-15-inch-retina-macbook-pro/

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2365069
            dmt_3904
            AskWoody Plus

            I agree.  I was looking on the refurb website – lots of choices but I haven’t dug in too much yet.

      • #2364930
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        DrBonzo, as usual makes some good points. The main thrust of what I wrote is based on my own experience and, yes, of course, absolutely, when I switched to Macs, I bought my current laptop as a fully loaded MacBook Pro, with a 15″ Retina (very high resolution, standard with all Macs) screen and plenty of RAM and a 1 TB SSD. I have long-learned the painful lesson that, for my needs, saving on hardware is a good way to throw good money down the drain. For someone else, the mileage may vary. As to a Mac Air? If someone else does a lot of traveling and, or going out of doors lugging a computer along, well, yes. Otherwise, well, no.

        The issue with ports is one of the galling aspects of Macs: it can be resolved with one hub with various kinds of ports, that connects via its own dongle to the Mac. It is a minor inconvenience if one does not have to carry the Mac around a long way, just within the house is manageable.

        But they definitely come with several ports, four in the case of the latest 13-inch M1 Mac, for example:

        https://www.apple.com/macbook-pro-13/specs/

        If one wishes to use HDMI or Ethernet, dongles for each, or just one for a hub, as already described, is then necessary.

         

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2364935
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I forgot about this so I am adding it here:

          Minor updates/patches, I usually wait for two weeks, minimum, before patching, no matter what operating system I am using, and keep my ears at maximum listening sensitivity for catching rumors/lamentations about/from any walking wounded. If anything undesirable pops up, I’ll look around the Web for confirmation/more details, and also here, at AskWoody. So I treat Macs the same as Windows, or Linux, in this respect. Doing so, I have not had any problems with macOS software updates/patches, in close to 5 years of using my Mac. Application software no pre-installed by Apple along with the operating system is another story altogether, so there it pays to be cautious and stay well-informed about it and its updates.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • #2365059
          anonymous
          Guest

          Correction: the 13-inch M1 MacBook Pro only offers two USB4 ports (USB4 works with USB-C and Thunderbolt 3). Apple still sells the 13-inch Intel MacBook Pro with four Thunderbolt 3 ports; these use Intel processors, not Apple M1.

          • #2365070
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Anonymous: Quite a timely observation.Thanks for pointing out something I should have stressed in my previous comment.

            I was recommending, but obviously did not made it clear enough, to buy a refurbished laptop like my MacBook Pro that, as I have explained earlier in this same thread further up, is a mid-2015 model that has a 15-inch screen. Also I was commenting on buying a refurbished Mac; it is most likely that a refurbished Mac, these days, is an Intel one. And the last article I linked in my previous comment was written in praise of the 2015, 15-inch-screen MacBook Pro, the one I recommend. Buying a smaller refurbished Mac (or a smaller Mac, in general) is, I believe, not as good a bet. But that is no much more than my own gut-feeling about it.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2364981
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I will never get another Mac unless it has an SSD. I haven’t checked the specs on new Macs in a while so I don’t know which come with/without spinning HDs.

        All Macs come with SSD. All M1 Macs have soldered RAM & SSD so you need to configure pre-buying.

        • #2365012
          pmcjr6142
          AskWoody Plus

          “All Macs come with SSD” may be true on the current models.  My 2019 iMac came with a regular HDD.  The SSD was an option that I unfortunately didn’t know the value in getting it.

      • #2364985
        SB9K
        AskWoody Lounger

        My only real issue with mac OS was the acceleration and sensitivity of the pointer when using a physical mouse. The brand and model of mouse did not matter.

        In mac OS, these properties appear to be linked, with both being adjusted by the “tracking speed” slider. A high setting has too much acceleration for my liking, and a low setting is not sensitive enough. Thus, I found the pointer movement undesirable at any setting, no matter how I moved the mouse.

        There are some terminal commands that mitigate this, but for me they were never good enough. I ended up buying a third party tool (CursorSense) to get linear behavior with a simple checkbox.

        Mind you, I did not find this necessary for the touchpad. MacBook touchpads are the best, but from my perspective that means “least bad”. I find all touchpads to be inferior to a real mouse, so I tolerate the former when there is no room for the latter.

        Gaming Rig: Windows 8.1 Pro
        Work Desktop: Linux Mint Cinnamon 20.1
        Notebook (guinea pig): Whatever flavor of Linux I tried last
        File Server: TurnKey Linux
        • #2364996
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I use the track pad in my Mac laptop without any real problems. Just a few nagging ones, requiring the reduction of the pad’s sensitivity to touch. For desktops there is an external track pad one can buy separately from the computer.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2365040
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        “All Macs come with SSD” may be true on the current models.  My 2019 iMac came with a regular HDD.  The SSD was an option that I unfortunately didn’t know the value in getting it.

        Of course current Macs. Older Macs came with SuperDrive too.

        • #2365051
          7ProSP1
          AskWoody Lounger

          Did you mean Fusion Drives?  SuperDrives are CD/DVD readers/writers that connect via USB.

      • #2365074
        dmt_3904
        AskWoody Plus

        Ah! Forgot to ask! What about internet security software ? I have heard that security software doesn’t work well/isn’t needed on MACs (or IOS for that matter).  I know they are still vulnerable, though less so than Windows (or Android for that matter) so, what security software are MAC users using? And is anyone using IOS security software? Thanks.

        • #2365078
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Macs have rather strong security built in, but one still needs to install antivirus software (AV), as in any other computer and, as far as I know, all the Macs AV are third party; I use Webroot SecurityEverywhere (it’s getting a bit long in the tooth already, I think) and Malwarebytes free version, that I run after every daily scan with the AV, just in case. The other security software one may need is in the form of browser addons and plugins. These are Mac versions of  what is also recommended for Windows: Privacy Badger, AdBlock Plus, uBlock Origin, etc.

          Macs share with Linux the fact that, being not nearly as numerous in user’s homes and offices as Windows PCs, they are less often the targets of cybercriminals, but not quite free of their attacks either.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2365119
            pmcjr6142
            AskWoody Plus

            I use Malwarebytes Premium at my grandfathered yearly price of $24.95.  Given the additional functionality over the free version, eg, being able to schedule scans (I run three per day) it is well worth the price.  The settings are very simple and much less involved than they are on a PC and the scans are usually less than a minute.

            • #2365125
              dmt_3904
              AskWoody Plus

              I have mbam premium on my Dell. I have about a year left.  Don’t know if I can transfer it. Will check avira, intego, webroot.

          • #2365126
            dmt_3904
            AskWoody Plus

            These are Mac versions of  what is also recommended for Windows: Privacy Badger, AdBlock Plus, uBlock Origin, etc.

            I was using these on Windows but am not comfortable that any of them can access any info input into the browser, if they want to. Not that they WILL but they CAN. yikes. I use FF on Windows, DuckDuckGo on IOS, clear cookies & history constantly.  FF says they stopped super cookies, so I hope I’m ok with trackers.

        • #2365079
          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Plus

          I like Avira Free for Mac. It’s free, has roughly the same functionality as Microsoft Security Essentials and Windows Defender had for Win 7 and 8.1, and gets pretty good reviews. Nathan Parker, a Mac guru who used to contribute often here likes Intego.

          You can find some discussion of Av/Security here:

          macOS

          And if you happen to run across a topic I started complaining about how I had to reinstall Avira every time my iMac rebooted, that turned out to be a temporay thing and it works just fine now.

          Other pages in the forums in the above link may have relevant topics as well; page 2 seemed to have a cluster of them.

          Edit: looks like the link above sends you to page 1, but page 2 has a small cluster of AV topics.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2365081
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        ProSP1: “Unfortunately, you wouldn’t be able to purchase any refurbished hardware from 2015 directly from Apple now.

        Well, that is not good. Because this creates a problem, unless one chances it and looks around for a reputable vendor of refurbished Macs that is not Ma’am Apple Herself. Or bites the bullet and buy one the new ones, with an M1 CPU and the good old-type “scissors” keyboard that went out of fashion at Apple Central after my glorious mid-2015 model was retired from sale.

        The immediate problem is that, until very recently, the models of Macs that followed the mid-2015 models, such as mine, all came with the awful “butterfly” keyboards, and those should really be avoided as much as possible — and even more than it is possible, in my opinion. But, according to the following, Apple finally give in and “fixed” the keyboards of Macs already sold and already used for a while by their owners. Whether the “refurbished” post-2015 Mac one could buy today have the keyboards “fixed” or not is worth investigating before buying a refurbished Mac, even if it is one sold by Apple Herself.

        https://www.macrumors.com/guide/butterfly-keyboard-vs-scissor-keyboard/

        Excerpts:

        “Mac Notebooks That Had Butterfly Keyboards”

        “The first Mac with a butterfly keyboard was released in 2015, and the last Mac with a butterfly keyboard was released in 2019. A full list of of Mac models with butterfly keyboards is below, and all of these Macs are eligible for Apple’s butterfly keyboard repair program.

        MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, Early 2015)
        MacBook (Retina, 12­-inch, Early 2016)
        MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, 2017)
        ‌MacBook Air‌ (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
        ‌MacBook Air‌ (Retina, 13-inch, 2019)
        MacBook Pro (13­-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
        MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
        MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
        MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
        MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
        MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2016)
        MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2017)
        MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
        MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2018)
        MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
        MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2019)

        “Why Apple Ditched Butterfly Keyboards”

        “There was a huge amount of criticism levied at Apple for its decision to continue using the butterfly keyboard for four years after people first started experiencing issues with the design, and dissatisfaction had ramped up to such a degree that there was no other choice for Apple but to adopt a new design.”

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2365137
        dmt_3904
        AskWoody Plus

        I am leaning toward the new iMac M1. My husband says why not pay the extra $$ bc you are getting more life out of the new model where refurbished, while a good deal, is already closer to date of obsolescence by a year or more.

        I am not a gamer, video, photo, editor but would have to get Core 8 model bc I need USB 3s.

        What’s the consensus on std Mouse vs. Magic Trackpad?

        For storage – 256 vs. 512gb can I compare current Dell storage to Mac for a guide? Or not the same? I have a TB hard drive but it’s less than half full.

         

        • #2365191
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          What’s the consensus on std Mouse vs. Magic Trackpad?

          I don’t use a mouse, I use a trackpad. There is also, from Apple, a combination mouse/trackpad (one passes fingers on it to scroll and taps them on it to click, the same as on a trackpad) called “magic mouse.” I know some people who use it, I don’t. My impression about it, from personal observation, is that people get used to it and seem pleased. Here there is some more information on it and also on other popular peripherals, such a keyboards.

          https://www.apple.com/shop/product/MLA02LL/A/magic-mouse-2-silver

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2365140
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Core 8 model bc I need USB 3s.

        The iMac M1 doesn’t have USB 3s. It comes with 4 USB-C and Ethernet port build into the power adapter.
        The M1 has soldered RAM and SSD storage so you should go for the maximum of both for future proof.

        If moving from Windows and you have data on external NTFS HDDs MacOS can read from NTFS but can’t write to NTFS. To re-use the HDDs you will need to format the drives to APFS or ExFat (slow) loosing all data.

      • #2365141
        dmt_3904
        AskWoody Plus

        https://www.apple.com/imac-24/specs/

        From apple Tech specs, did I misunderstand?

         

        Connections and Expansion
        Core 7
        Two Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports with support for:
        DisplayPort
        Thunderbolt 3 (up to 40Gb/s)
        USB 4 (up to 40Gb/s)
        USB 3.1 Gen 2 (up to 10Gb/s)
        Thunderbolt 2, HDMI, DVI, and VGA supported using adapters (sold separately)
        3.5 mm headphone jack
        Configurable with Gigabit Ethernet

        Core 8
        Close up of two Thunderbolt/ USB 4 ports on iMac in pink
        connections and expansion image for 2-port ModelThunderbolt / USB 4
        Gigabit Ethernet
        Two USB 3 ports (up to 10Gb/s)

        • #2365227
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          The nice young lady in this video explains everything about the (way too) numerous avatars of USB manifesting themselves to us mortals over the decades. One thing about the video that is most unusual: She speaks clearly, gets to the point quickly and repeatedly, explains things fully and (in my opinion) satisfactorily, in a 5-minute video, without wasting one’s time and sorely trying one’s patience:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dERa_bMDvcg

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2365146
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        did I misunderstand?

        Yes. The USB3.1 gen 2 are USB-C ports.
        If you need USB 3 ports you should buy a hub with multiple ports. Something like
        Plugable 14-in-1 USB-C and Thunderbolt 3 Dock

      • #2365165
        pmcjr6142
        AskWoody Plus

        I have mbam premium on my Dell. I have about a year left.  Don’t know if I can transfer it. Will check avira, intego, webroot.

        Yes, you can transfer it.  That’s what I did.  You use your existing MBAM license key when you install MBAM on the Mac.

        https://support.malwarebytes.com/hc/en-us/articles/360038522574

        • #2365282
          dmt_3904
          AskWoody Plus

          Oh that’s excellent I didn’t think I would be able to do that! Thanks

      • #2365284
        dmt_3904
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks everyone for your help and great info! I’ll check it out and will probably also have more questions 😀

      • #2365417
        Ascaris
        AskWoody MVP

        I would not get a PC of any type (whether Mac, Windows, Linux) that had only a HDD in this day and age. If it had a SSD for the OS and a HDD for data, it might be okay, but that depends on the details. My Dell G3, for example, came with this setup… it had a 128GB SATA SSD in the M.2 slot and a 1TB HDD in the 2.5″ bay. I swapped both; I put a 250GB NVMe x4 SSD (Samsung 970 Evo) in the M.2 slot and a 1TB SATA 2.5″ SSD (Samsung 850 Evo) in the 2.5″ bay. As long as they are swappable, I am good with it.

        Of course, not all M.2 slots can handle both SATA and NVMe, and of those that will accept NVMe, some only enable two PCIe lanes (NVMe x2) while others allow all four. You will have to consult the specifications to find out what the M.2 slot capabilities are.

        My Acer Swift also has an M.2 slot, but it is SATA only.

        Actual hard drives are becoming less common in laptops these days, but if you encounter one, it is nearly always swappable for a 2.5″ SATA SSD.

        Most modern general purpose laptops will probably not have a hard drive bay anymore, and will use only SSDs. That’s one thing I am personally unwilling to tolerate being soldered to the motherboard. RAM is bad enough, but SSDs are a step too far for me.

        Soldered SSDs save some vertical space, but given that my ultra-thin Dell XPS 13 manages to include a M.2 slotted SSD, going soldered seems more like a cynical ploy both to milk the user for more cash at purchase time and to make the laptop obsolete sooner than it otherwise would. When I bought the XPS 13 (about two months ago), I was looking for a model with the basic (full HD, IPS, but not touch or UHD 4k) screen, i5 CPU, and 16GB of RAM (because it is soldered; otherwise I’d just look for a good deal and upgrade it later).

        None of the models offered in the “consumer” section had this combo, even when I checked the “customize” options; to get 16GB, you had to at least get the i7, which added considerable cost without any upgrade in the cooling system at all, which seemed like a bad deal, given that these machines are constrained by thermals even with the lowest end chips. After some annoyance, I decided to check the business section for their listings of the XPS 13, where I found the “Developer’s Edition,” which came with Ubuntu instead of Windows 10, but even more importantly, allowed me to upgrade the base model to 16GB while keeping the basic display and i5 CPU.

        I had to pay whatever price Dell wanted for the 16GB, of course, since I could not just upgrade it later. If I refused to pay their price, I would have an 8GB unit that could well be obsolete much sooner, and if I agreed to pay, I would pay a lot more for the extra 8GB than I would if I just bought it on my own as a SoDIMM. I paid what Dell asked.

        On the SSD, though, Dell wanted $200 more for the upgrade from the base 256GB SSD to the largest they offered, a 1TB. These are upgradeable, so I ordered the 256GB, and when the XPS arrived, I swapped the 256GB for a 1TB I had ordered for a cost of $130. I got to keep the $70 difference and the spare 256GB SSD, and I also got to select the exact model of SSD I wanted. I was leaning toward a 2TB model, which Dell didn’t even offer, but I instead chose the SK Hynix P31 1TB. There were cheaper 1TB NVMe SSDs, but the P31 is the champion of low power operation, which means better battery life, and it’s fast too. On Kdiskmark (essentially a Linux port of CrystalDiskMark), I get 3400 MB/s sequential read and 3100 MB/s sequential write (nominal values are 3500/3200).

        The 256GB Dell put in my unit was a much slower one than the P31, especially on writes. It tops out at under 1 GB per second write speed, with reads coming in at around 2GB per second on sequential read. Yeah, it ticks the box for NVMe x4, but it’s not in the same performance league as the P31.

        What is the 1TB unit that Dell would have used? I don’t know… they didn’t say.

        The upgrade cycle on SSDs is faster than on RAM. My desktop PC has 16GB of RAM, and it has for years. It was a “decent” amount of RAM back then, and it is still “decent” now. The SSDs on offer, though, were nothing like what we have access to now. I paid more for my Samsung 840 Pro 128GB SSD than I did for the 1TB P31!

        In the future, I hope that SK Hynix will release a 2TB version of the P31, and if it is in the same “bang for your buck” category as the 1TB now is, I will buy one, and put the 1TB in the G3 in place of the 256TB that is now there. I have no doubt that the XPS 13 will still be a very usable and non-obsolete model at that point in time, and that its 16GB of RAM will be “decent” at that point also.

        SSD tech moves too fast for me to be willing to accept a non-M.2, soldered version. It also bothers me that SSDs are consumable items, and soldering one to the motherboard makes the computer itself a disposable item. Yes, it will take a long time to wear out a SSD, which many people worry about needlessly, but it still rubs me the wrong way to have a disposable PC that costs over a thousand bucks.

        If anything were to fail on that motherboard in such a way that it refused to boot the OS, the data on the SSD would remain trapped, even though the SSD portion of the board is fine.

        I’ll tolerate soldered RAM if I can get enough of it. I’ll tolerate a paucity of ports if those that do exist maintain the full capability of those it would otherwise have. I’ve had to tolerate both in the XPS 13, but the lack of a M.2 slot…. no, too much, unless we’re talking about a super cheap low end laptop. A high end one like a Mac (or XPS) needs to have a M.2 slot IMO.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.0 User Edition)

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