• Terabyte update 2022

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    #2454730

    ISSUE 19.25 • 2022-06-20 HARDWARE By Will Fastie This year, the trend line for storage prices is harder to discern. In last year’s installment of this
    [See the full post at: Terabyte update 2022]

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    • #2454874

      By coincidence, I did a similar survey for myself. My survey was similarly limited to Western Digital HDDs vs (WD)SanDisk and Crucial SSDs  But I looked at raw cost per GB without regard for device size. Nor did I have any historical records.

      The absolute cheapest was a 4000 GB WD Blue 3.5″ HDD for $65 – or 1.6 cents per GB.

    • #2454879

      The wild card in computer hardware costs for the coming year is the war in the Ukraine.

      One of the world’s biggest suppliers (Russia) of neon, argon and helium used in the manufacture of semiconductors has started to limit exports.

      In addition, 45 to 54% of the neon gas used for semiconductor manufacturing has been lost through the shutdown of production facilities in the Ukrainian.

      As a result, chip makers are facing a shortage of essential raw materials.

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    • #2454936

      On a personal reflective and rather somber note:

      I imagine that computer components, and the computers themselves are likely to continue at current prices, or some at even lower ones, perhaps from between one or two years to perhaps five, taking into account the reasons given by Will Fastie in his article for being hopeful that they will be.

      Beyond that, the future of computer components, mass-storage drives included, is even less predictable than usual, because, in part, of the way the world’s industrial production and economy have been globalized and also concentrated in fewer hands.

      Meaning that production and services have been exported to far away nations, where this has been beneficial by increasing employment, even if at a low pay, and rising people from serious poverty while increasing the numbers of the technically skilled, but greatly extending the lines of transportation that are subject to the chain-supply issues we are currently experiencing; a globalization that have left many without employment, satisfying or at all, back at home. This along with the monopolistic development of mega corporations controlling most of the production in many key industries, as well as overwhelming their competition with their sheer size, are some of the developments that have been under way since the late 70s.

      These are deeply rooted systemic issues that are not quickly, or easily changed.

      They have certainly increased, overall, shareholder value, but have left the highly integrated and overstretched world economy in a fragile state that unexpected events are now severely testing, including the ongoing pandemic. This being followed closely by a series of catastrophic natural events that evidence increasingly indicates are the symptoms of a changing climate.

      And the unprecedented conditions for economic growth and increasing prosperity that lasted from 1945 through 1976, and to a lesser extent until more recently, when people could still reasonably expect to be making and getting more and better things to continue improving their standards of living, probably are no longer going to be there. What we may have ahead, instead, is a long prospect of doing less with less.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2454945

      On a … rather somber note:

      I would share that pessimism except for one thing – rapid deployment of fabrication facilities outside the PACRIM. For example, last November Micron said it would invest $150B over the next decade and throughout the world, including the US, to increase memory fabrication capability.

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      • #2454953

        Will Fastie: “rapid deployment of fabrication facilities outside the PACRIM” (Pacific Rim nations: in this context mainly China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan — maybe also with Singapore,  Australia and New Zealand?)

        That is precisely the reason for short-time hopefulness I mentioned early in my long and not too-hopeful comment.

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2454946

      One of the world’s biggest suppliers (Russia) of neon, argon and helium used in the manufacture of semiconductors has started to limit exports.

      But, apparently, not to China and India.

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    • #2455175

      I used lots of 2 tb drives as cartridges, having gradually replaced HD drives (those are dutifully kept as desperation backups). I always buy the cheapest reputable solid state devices I can find, including 2.5″ ssds. Currently I keep an eye on the price of Leven brand 2 TB ssds at Amazon, which are around $130. That’s been trending gradually downward. I find that Newegg and Amazon usually match each other in a slow downward spiral. I’ve bought about 10 Leven drives at this point and none has failed so far.

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