• The 2022 Milky Way Photographer of the Year

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    #2447607

    https://capturetheatlas.com/milky-way-photographer-of-the-year/

    Photographing the Milky Way is a magical experience.

    There aren’t many events as moving as seeing our galaxy rising and illuminating the night sky. However, at night, many things are invisible to the naked eye. When you use a camera to capture the Milky Way, a whole new world of details, colors, and light opens up.

    Beyond the technical aspects, every Milky Way photograph has a story and a seed that has been growing in the photographer’s mind for some time until all the elements align to create the image.

    To help you find inspiration for planning and executing your Milky Way images, we’ve gathered the best Milky Way images taken around the world, as we do every year. Buckle up because this trip is going to take you from the remote deserts of Xingjian, Atacama, and Utah to the unfamiliar landscapes of Tibet, Australia, and New Zealand, passing by spectacular glaciers, volcanoes, mountains, beaches…always with the Milky Way shining in the sky…

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Alex5723.
    • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by PKCano.
    • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by PKCano.
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    • #2447678

      Dood! These are amaaaazzing! Thank you!

      Finance, social and tech founder. Managing director of new crowd sourced games in pre-release development. Director on a new consortium to bring fractional ownership of heritage antiquities to the blockchain. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
    • #2447787

      Strangest-looking Milky Way pictures I’ve ever seen. I imagine that the curved-arch effect has been achieved, in each case, by “unrolling’ a 360-degree picture. (Or the composite of several?)

      One thing I miss seeing at night, in a place far from light pollution, preferably during a new Moon and with clear skies, are the Magellanic Clouds, two smaller satellite galaxies of the Milky Way that can only be seen from the Southern Hemisphere. Last time I saw them was decades ago, from the backyard of a house, out in the southern Tasmanian wilderness, near Port Arthur:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magellanic_Clouds

      The Milky Way has several satellite galaxies, all quite nearby compared with the rest, but the only ones big enough to be seen with the naked eye are those two.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2447796

      Strangest-looking Milky Way pictures I’ve ever seen. I imagine that the curved-arch effect has been achieved, in each case, by “unrolling’ a 360-degree picture. (Or the composite of several?)

      Each picture has a exif and camera gear.

      • #2447831

        Alex: That’s “Interesting.” And possibly also interesting

        So was it a 360-degree picture? (The file format and information it can contain are not terribly reveling, I am afraid, to one like me who is not into that sort of thing.)

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2447849

      The sad part is that a vast majority of Americans don’t live in an area remote enough, and thus dark enough, to even see the Milky Way.  And that’s sad.  Especially in the summer, when the galactic core ( well, 30 percent of it, anyway) can be seen through the constellation Sagittarius looking dead south.   I am fortunate to live in a fairly dark area, but I still get airglow effects that limit how much of the arm I can see.

      A couple of times a year I make the three-hour journey (trust me, it is a journey) to a place in West Virginia called Spruce Knob.  It’s almost a mile high, and the closest town, Elkins, is 20 miles away. It’s one of the darkest areas on the east coast, and it hosts an awesome ‘star party’ every year in September.  On a moonless night, the entire Milky Way —- the core and the arm that juts from it and gently crosses the sky above you is so bright you could almost read a book by it.  But I’m content just looking at it’s spectacular beauty and wondering how many intelligent civilizations could be in that spiraling arm.

       

      "War is the remedy our enemies have chosen. And I say let us give them all they want" ----- William T. Sherman

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2447854

        ClearThunder: “a place in West Virginia called Spruce Knob. It’s almost a mile high, and the closest town, Elkins, is 20 miles away. It’s one of the darkest areas on the east coast, and it hosts an awesome ‘star party’ every year in September.

        If Spruce Knob is close to Elkins it can’t be too far from the Green Banks large radio telescope, that sits on the National Radio Quiet zone designed to avoid leaks from radio transmissions (e.g., from and to cell phones) interfere with the telescope observations. So Spruce Knob is inside this protected zone. I did not know that Elkins was inside it until recently. That must make a difference to how people listen to the radio and watch TV there, which I know they do. So Spruce Knob at night must be as free of electromagnetic radiation right across the spectrum as any place on land can be:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_National_Radio_Quiet_Zone

        As to watching the entire Milky Way … that would be the part one can see from the Northern Hemisphere. (See my previous comment mentioning the Magellanic Clouds, that also goes for the other half of the Milky Way, visible from there.) The Milky Way is just too long and tilted relative to the celestial equator to be seen all at once from anywhere on Earth:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

        But it looks like if one is somewhere in the Tropics, not too far from the equator, one could just manage to see the whole thing, but not all of it at the same time:

        https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/692037-the-milky-way-in-the-southern-hemisphere/

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2447886

      So was it a 360-degree picture?

      If you look at many of the photos Exifs you will notice that hey are stitched from form many shots. Example : the second shot was made from (16x vertical shots). No 360 shooting.

    • #2447950

      Alex: Thanks for explaining that this is a picture stitched-up of several pictures.

      (I wouldn’t know the difference between an “exif” and a telephone pole. Have no reason to. The definitions I’ve found on the Web are no help, because the explainers are terrible, writing for those who should already know what that is.)

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

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