• The annoyances of a new computer

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    • #2636744

      Why post new newsletter articles that lead to nowhere ?
      First publish the newsletter and then the posts .

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2636758

        add in mastodon and then this, looks a bit like paywalling and canvassing such as the newsmedia

        * _ being 20 in the 70's was fun _ *
      • #2636824

        I’m not understanding?  When you receive the plus newsletter the post is there in full.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

    • #2636749

      Perhaps the newsletter article would be better titled as “The Annoyances of Windows 11”.

      Reading this article added further support to my decision to stick with Windows 10 as long as possible.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2636764

      It’s obvious Microsoft really want’s you to use a Microsoft account. So I wonder how the experience will be if you use a new / existing Microsoft account?

      As for Windows 11, I upgraded my home-notebook running Windows 10 Home to Windows 11 Home last month. Windows 10 was set up with a local account. The upgrade was as smooth as a babies bottom, no nagging about a Microsoft account. After about 30 minutes, the whole environment almost looked like the Windows 10 environment. A pleasant surprise.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2636823

      as a professional consultant to many small businesses I routinely work with Windows and Apple. I agree with your initial assessment. The Apple ecosystem is so much easier to work with and less requiring of convoluted methods to install even a local user. I don’t know why at this late date MICROSOFT insists on leaving a local user off of a machine, forcing us to do a stupidly complex install. When people ask me what computer they should use unless they have a real need for inexpensive computers or Windows products, and then paying me to set them up, I tell them  to just buy a Mac . it is funny how cheap people will be to buy the initial computer and then be willing to pay me my hourly fee to set it up properly. It all ends up in the wash being about the same price. I rarely ever hear from my Macintosh users. It just works.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2636834

      Want to migrate your Windows computer to a new PC?

      When I transferred an XP Pro installation to a new build twenty-odd years ago, I used a data transfer utility that was native to XP for my docs and settings, but found that I didn’t need it because restoring drive images from the old build transferred everything to the new build.  A couple of drivers to install, and that was it.  I was still using exactly the same setup.

      And that’s all I’ve used since; create an up-to-date image of the old PC, restore it to the new PC.  That is, if I wasn’t just moving drives from the old PC to the new PC, in which case drivers were the only concern, and I already had them at the ready with the new hardware.

      If I were to get a new laptop that’s not a replacement, the steps would be no@thankyou.com, the “Hi” experience, install Revo Uninstaller, force-uninstall Edge, upgrade to Pro, GPedit no drivers from Windows Update.  I have, completely without issue, never run Edge-Chromium.  Edge can be uninstalled leaving WebView 2, which is the only component of any use, and is not dependent on Edge.  The latest update of my video editing software uses WebView 2.  But I never see Edge or the Edge icon, anywhere.

      Or I could just “no@thankyou.com”, do the Pro upgrade, then restore a drive image from my old laptop and update drivers as necessary.  Edge (and other extraneous Microsoft fluff) would already be uninstalled.

      The company from which I retired had their domain setup for sever/client, roving user accounts, and did all deployments via images.  New replacement PC’s/laptops were pre-imaged by IT and login-and-go; everything was there.  If one had a personal folder, just copy it to a thumbdrive and then transfer to the new PC/laptop.

      Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
      We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2636848

      I used to enjoy the challenge of fixing issues in Windows but I’m now at the point where I feel Windows has gotten too complex and flaky that some issues just can’t be sorted without a format/reinstall. So I’m now in the “treat the OS as disposable” camp, at least for desktops/laptops anyway.

      • #2636859

        I feel Windows has gotten too complex and flaky that some issues just can’t be sorted without a format/reinstall.

        One way to speed up the format/reinstall process is to take an image backup of your first installation. Once all of your settings are in place, you take a backup. Then, if you ever feel the need to start over, you restore the image, and save an hour (or more) making adjustments.

    • #2636871

      Susan, I greatly appreciate your invaluable guidance in what has become the dark thicket known as Windows.
      I look forward to the day when you give up on Microsoft and AskWoody switches its focus to Linux. I am doing that now, and will enjoy having your help and guidance when you get there!

      • #2636875

        Linux still lacks when it comes to tools for active directory and management in a firm.  It’s going to be a long time before I give up on Microsoft.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

      • #2637138

        I agree with Susan here. I work for an MSP and many of the clients we support simply could not move to Linux. There’s almost always some important LOB software that doesn’t have a Linux version. Some I can think of are the important, known ones like AutoCAD and the Adobe suite (e.g. Photoshop), or somewhat obscure case management software used by legal firms (e.g. PracticeEvolve, eXpd8 or Keyhouse). While enthusiasts might say “just use Wine”, access to support is crucial in a business setting. If the vendor will only support Windows, then that’s what you have to go with.

    • #2636892

      Migrating an iphone to another iphone (both same model) wasn’t simple and painless in my experience.  This was done at an apple store. The migration was about 90% complete when it stopped, saying it couldn’t continue until the receiving phone was updated.   That took a while, then the migration started again, from the beginning.  It all took about 1.5 hours.  In spite of them assuring me that all settings would migrate, that the “new phone would be exactly like the old one”, it wasn’t true.  Modem login settings were lost, along with numerous other settings.

      The ultimate insult was that the new phone didn’t work any better than the old one.  In spite of Apple phone support swearing it would solve the problem. I won’t go into all the bad experiences with Apple phone support.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2636908

      I’m not understanding?  When you receive the plus newsletter the post is there in full.

      The posts on askwoody are published way before they are published on ‘newsletter/alert’ so you get ‘404’ when trying to read in full, and before getting the newsletter in mail.

    • #2636915

      Migrating an iphone to another iphone (both same model) wasn’t simple and painless in my experience.

      My experience is different. I am upgrading my iPhone every year/2 years (since my first iPhone 4). I just restore from iCloud backup as I find it the easiest way.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2636948

      I kept using Windows 7 for the 3-year period after Windows 7 expired,  using Extended Security Updates (ESUs)  because I dreaded the day when I would have to switch to a new operating system,  and because I remembered how much of my time it took to upgrade from Windows XP to Windows 7.  The ESUs cost me approximately $500, but I viewed it as worth the money in order to avoid having to spend time changing to a new operating system.  I had hoped that Microsoft would extend the ESU program beyond 3 years,  but they didn’t.  So I  faced the reality of changing to a new computer (because my Windows 7 computer wouldn’t be adequate for Windows 10).  Overall,  it took me about 13 months  (from November of 2022 to  January of 2024)  because I only had limited time to spend on it and because I’m not as computer literate as most of the people who use this website.  I kept track of the amount of hours it took me, and it was approximately 200 hours.  This included time spent on (1) purchasing a new computer and other equipment such as a printer; (2) going through the setup process of a new operating system; (3) trying to get the old peripheral equipment to work on the new computer; (4) reading articles and portions of books (such as Woody’s book) on Windows 10; (5) troubleshooting various problems; (6) getting rid of junkware that comes with a new computer; (7) transferring all my data to the new computer; (8) purchasing new software such as Outlook 2021; (9) transferring my e-mails from Outlook 2010 to Outlook 2021, where I encountered numerous problems; (10) learning new Windows Updates procedures;  and (11) documenting new procedures so that I can remember how to do them.  In all likelihood it would take much fewer hours for most of the people who use this website, but for someone like me who has less knowledge, skills, and abilities,  that’s how long it took.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2636949

      The ESUs cost me approximately $500

      While 0Patch pro would have cost you $90.
      Windows 10 ESUs will cost probably the same (if not more).

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2636959

        I spent quite a bit of time researching the 0Patch option also.  I would have to go through a lot of old e-mails to find an exact quotation,  but in the end I decided that the original security updates from Microsoft would be better,  and so I paid the extra money for those.  But maybe I’ll consider 0Patch in the future if I want to continue with Windows 10 when it expires.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2637001

      Thanks for the article onWindows 11 on a new computer. I recently bought a new laptop with W11 Pro. v23H3. Having been away from MS and computers and being an oldish senior citizen I just hung onto the saddle and went on the MS setup ride. I’ve since  turned off much of the stuff I neither want nor use but have a nagging thought about my set up using a MS Account. Is there a simple/easy way to change to a Local Account? Thanks inadvance.

    • #2637046

      Great suggestion for setting up a local account on a new machine/install. But, I think I will use my old and tried and true method. Disconnect the network cable and/or shut off the wifi. Windows can’t call home and you end up with a local account. after Windows is installed, then reconnect to the internet to get the latest updates.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2637221

      Linux still lacks when it comes to tools for active directory and management in a firm.  It’s going to be a long time before I give up on Microsoft.

      Susan, are these of any help?

      https://ubuntu.com/blog/new-active-directory-integration-features-in-ubuntu-22-04-part-1

      https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/333/what-is-the-equivalent-of-active-directory-on-linux

       

    • #2637223

      It’s my opinion that this mentality — that the desktop doesn’t matter and can be easily wiped away — persists inside the Microsoft organization.

      This isn’t opinion –it’s fact, at least at C-level. Satya Nadella, et al. haven’t cared about the user, nor the people that support them in years. And they won’t as long as there isn’t another desktop OS vendor giving them a run for their money. Even more so now that they want to direct everyone to a Microsoft account -which i truly wouldn’t mind, if they made it as unobtrusive as having an iCloud account is on my iPhone (narrator’s voice: However, they do not.)

      As long as there isn’t another (I use that term loosely), consistent infrastructure that provides people with an office suite, document sharing with granular permissions, command-and-control policy options to manage the userbase, from top-to-bottom, this isn’t going to change. Even despite the fact that Microsoft support has become an abysmal exercise in clinical depression for IT people, if Microsoft gets their subscription revenue quarter-over-quarter and it’s not so broken nobody can use it, it will continue because of inertia.

      I’ve been a Windows tech, then admin/engineer/senior engineer for what will be 29 years this year. I miss the days of Steve Ballmer, who at least gave a care about how the userbase  works (not saying Microsoft was perfect, but no human organization ever has been).  But just as much, I miss the days of NeXT, BeOS, OS/2 Warp, Solaris -because I miss competition and options. I miss having enough alternatives to keep Microsoft on their toes.

      Interestingly enough, because I have a spare laptop, I installed Linux Mint with Cinnamon the other day.  And while I did have pretty bog-standard hardware (a ThinkPad T480), not only was the installation not incredibly difficult, but I got nearly every app I’d need in the standard installation because they were smart enough to make agreements to bundle them. The networking setup is simple, unlike what some distributions of Linux were, and yet most security features I need are supported too. And with LibreOffice, Gimp, Firefox, Brave Browser, Zoom, (admittedly experimental) Microsoft Teams, Dropbox, all available (many included), I’m suddenly asking myself: Aside from gaming and a couple of very specific apps I use at work, how much do I need Windows compared to this?

      If Microsoft is going to continue to take us for granted, and there is an alternative that works for what I need, how much longer am I going to stay on their path?

      We are SysAdmins.
      We walk in the wiring closets no others will enter.
      We stand on the bridge, and no malware may pass.
      We engage in support, we do not retreat.
      We live for the LAN.
      We die for the LAN.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2638019

      Hello Susan,

      I am running Win 10 with the latest updates. My Dell 3471 desktop has gone slower and slower with each new Win 10 update. It has some special software I used for work before I retired from the aerospace industry, and other software I wrote many years ago with Basic on a WinXP computer, then compiled it to run on Win 7. It still works on Win 10 (I was really surprised at that). I have 3 email addresses I use regularly, but one is getting very balky, and my college just announced that all alumni email accounts are going away in a few months. It is my primary email account right now.

      I have become a freelance writer, so I need this computer and its programs for support in this endeavor. The email I use most for writing is the alumni account. The noose is tightening.

      I am not an IT person, so don’t know how I could port all my apps and programs to a new Win 11 computer. I don’t even have installation files for some of them anymore. I shudder about any attempt to install Win 11 on this computer given how slow it is now (it has a 1TB hard drive). In fact, you said don’t even try in one of your earlier topics.

      My wife happily uses her MacBook Pro, and Apple support is just fabulous. But a Mac won’t run the programs I need. It doesn’t do a decent job with the Mac version of MS Office either.

    • #2638023

      I shudder about any attempt to install Win 11 on this computer given how slow it is now

      Create a full image backup of your current PC to external HDD.
      Install a NVME SSD drive (if your PC has no NVME slot install 2.5″ SATA SSD).
      Restore your image backup into the SSD.
      Use your installed HDD for data.
      Add some RAM (16GB is good enough).

      You will get a new, fast PC.

      Use InControl app or registry updates to block Windows 11 installation.
      If you are running Windows 10 Pro that can be done using GPEdit.

      You have until October 2025 with Windows 10 after which you may buy 3 years of ESU (~$500) or 0patch Pro (~$90).

      * Is your PC Windows 11 compatible (if not, you have nothing to worry). Check compatibility with WhyNotWin11

    • #2638064

      I shudder about any attempt to install Win 11 on this computer given how slow it is now

      Create a full image backup of your current PC to external HDD.
      Install a NVME SSD drive (if your PC has no NVME slot install 2.5″ SATA SSD).
      Restore your image backup into the SSD.
      Use your installed HDD for data.
      Add some RAM (16GB is good enough).

      You will get a new, fast PC.

      Use InControl app or registry updates to block Windows 11 installation.
      If you are running Windows 10 Pro that can be done using GPEdit.

      You have until October 2025 with Windows 10 after which you may buy 3 years of ESU (~$500) or 0patch Pro (~$90).

      * Is your PC Windows 11 compatible (if not, you have nothing to worry). Check compatibility with WhyNotWin11

      Exactly this.

      Nobody should be using a legacy hard disk on their desktop any more. Depending on the age of a system, it should have a 2.5″ SATA or M.2 NVMe SSD in it. They are inexpensive, and breathe new life into a system.   Windows isn’t responsible for slowing a PC down when that PC doesn’t have an SSD; or rather, it could be slowing it down, but every operating system will bog down over time when one is using a legacy hard disk. It’s relatively simple to use a bootable USB stick to clone the hard disk drive to an SSD using Macrium Reflect or AOMEI Backupper.

      Note that a Dell Inspiron 3471 (at least, if it was a Core i3 model) was an entry-level system to begin with, but it’s a 9th-gen so it’s probably quad-core. An SSD and an upgrade to 16GB of RAM should give it a new outlook on life.  You should also do your upgrade as two 8GB modules; this will mean your memory operates in dual-channel mode which will greatly boost your graphics performance and ease system bottlenecks.

      We are SysAdmins.
      We walk in the wiring closets no others will enter.
      We stand on the bridge, and no malware may pass.
      We engage in support, we do not retreat.
      We live for the LAN.
      We die for the LAN.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
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