• These invisible images let companies spy on your email..

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    #2503771

    https://www.laptopmag.com/how-to/these-invisible-images-let-companies-spy-on-your-email-heres-how-to-stop-them

    Your emails are spying on you. Out of the gazillion emails that hit our inboxes every day, most of them have hidden trackers capable of informing the recipient when you open them, where you open them, how many times you’ve read them, and much more — a privacy nightmare many call “endemic.” Fortunately, there are ways you can protect yourself and your inbox…

    What are email tracking pixels?
    The email tracking pixel is a surprisingly simple concept that allows anyone to secretly gather loads of information on you as soon as you interact with their messages.

    When someone wants to track whether you’ve read their email, they embed a tiny 1 pixel by 1 pixel image inside it. Once you open the email, it pings the server where the image is stored and logs the interaction. Not only does the sender trace whether you have clicked their email and how many times it’s been clicked on, it can also tell your location by checking where that network ping was launched and which sort of device was used…

    If email tracking pixels are invisible, how do you spot them? Most email clients like Gmail and Outlook don’t have a built-in mechanism for this, but you can turn to third-party tools.

    For Gmail, we suggest a Chrome and Firefox extension called Ugly Email. It adds a little “eyeball” icon next to the emails that are loaded with tracking pixels and then blocks them from spying on you. Alternatively, if you’re a Yahoo or Outlook user, you can try Trocker, which similarly marks emails with trackers on their websites. ..

    * The same method of embedded pixel is used to upload private TAX data to Facebook.

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    • #2503795

      Em Client detects tracking pixels also but only the paid version blocks them.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2503848

      All my messages are read in plain text, sent in plain text, and images are blocked.

      Carpe Diem {with backup and coffee}
      offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender
      offline▸ Acer TravelMate P215-52 RAM8GB Win11Pro 22H2.22621.674 x64 i5-10210U SSD Firefox106.0 MicrosoftDefender
      online▸ Win11Pro 22H2.22621.1105 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox110.0b5 MicrosoftDefender
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2503857

      “Alternatively, if you’re a Yahoo or Outlook user, you can try Trocker, which similarly marks emails with trackers on their websites.”

      Speaking of trackers, just be aware that Trocker is offered through Google’s chrome web store . . .

      Win 7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit; Office 2010; Group B (SaS); Former 'Tech Weenie'
      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2503860

      Using an Email Client:
      Disable image/ resource loading in the email client to protect from email trackers that also avoids pixeltracking.

      More Privacy:
      Turn off HTML email entirely, reading messages in plain text format where privacy protection is mission critical across all acounts in the email client.

      Webmail and some clients
      untick ‘Load remote content in messages’ within settings.

      No extensions at all, how do you KNOW you can trust them?
      Outa the frying pan, into the fire…

      WaaS = Windows as a Syphon...suckers!

      6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2503869

        Safety requires good sense, not more toys.

        Carpe Diem {with backup and coffee}
        offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender
        offline▸ Acer TravelMate P215-52 RAM8GB Win11Pro 22H2.22621.674 x64 i5-10210U SSD Firefox106.0 MicrosoftDefender
        online▸ Win11Pro 22H2.22621.1105 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox110.0b5 MicrosoftDefender
    • #2503866

      I went to the laptopmag.com article to read it. When I was done, I was curious to see what else this website had to offer. But as the pointer approached the top of the page, a notification popped up inviting me to provide my mail address.

      This is not unusual, but what is unusual is that clicking on the X to dismiss the notification doesn’t do anything. Nor does hitting the Esc key, another normal way to get rid of a notification So I can’t browse around their website and the only thing to do is to close the browser tab.

      Pale Moon 31.4.0, FWIW.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2503924

        From the image that Purg2 provided, this is an overlay and the way I deal with overlays is via an extension/add-on called Behind the Overlay. It’s available for Firefox and Vivaldi (and other Chromium based browsers).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2503879

      This is not unusual, but what is unusual is that clicking on the X to dismiss the notification doesn’t do anything.

      lead by example of course, just like the GWX popup in Windows 7!

      WaaS = Windows as a Syphon...suckers!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2503896

      My home PC is running FF ESR 102.5.0 and had no problem closing the sign-up request at laptopmag by clicking the “X.”  Perhaps uBlock Origin is lending a hand, shrugs.

      Little e-mailing on free outlook.com account.  Creditors primarily.  Online purchases from new sources are highly scrutinized.  Other than that mostly no issues, touches wood.

       

      Win 8.1 (home & pro) Group B, Linux Dabbler

    • #2504126

      Clicking the X worked for me and I use firefox.

      I use the duckduckgo email redirect and it blocks and detects trackers.  I think it’s funny that some privacy newsletters use trackers lol unsubscribe.

      Turning off remote images seems a little extreme to me or inconvenient.  When I used Outlook which was years ago I had it set to turn off html and some emails were readable some were not.

      To me the convenience of being able to read any email as intended outweighs the need to not be tracked.  There are so much analytics on the web now fighting it seems a losing game.  I erase cookies and all that but does it really do anything?

      This is a bit off topic but I wish the public could search through their own dossiers that are being compiled by advertisers / law enforcement / political campaigns, etc.

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