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  • Is this the best science fiction show ever?

    Home Forums Outside the box Fun Stuff Is this the best science fiction show ever?

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      • #2013820
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        This is Wavy’s fault ( #2013698 ), because he wrote elsewhere (and way off topic, I must add) that the best science fiction EVER is ‘The Expanse’, that one can watch right now in Amazon Prime.

        I disagree, most bitterly: The best science fiction show, ever, was “Firefly”:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefly_(TV_series)

        And, although it is harder to classify as such, the best SF show that lasted longer than one season was, unquestionably, ‘Futurama’:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurama

        Feel free to dissent here.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by OscarCP.
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      • #2013947
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        Well, not having seen every SF series that’s ever gone on the air, I feel unqualified to state what may or may not be the best SF show ever.  🙂

        However, what I can say confidently is that my personal all-time favorite SF series is the original “Star Trek.” Sure, the production values were hokey and the acting a bit lacking, but the show just soared (so to speak) on the story lines.

        I can also tell you the worst SF series I’ve ever seen.

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        • #2013954
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Cybertooth: I feel somewhat disappointed with your choice of the original Star Trek. I would have thought that ST the Next Generation was much superior: among others, it had both Spock AND Data, Patrick Stewart’s Captain Piccard (who was, unquestionably, so much superior and more interesting than William Shatner’s C. Kirk), Commander Worf, Klingons, plus, as a bonus, Marina Sirtis as Deanna Troi, the well-rounded Betazoid Counselor AND Lwaxana Troi (played by Roddeberry’s wife Majel) as her very interesting mother! The original ST just couldn’t compete. It didn’t had Scotty, but Levar Burton’s Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge was no slouch as Chief Engineer, even when he was blind and the dilithium crystals were always such a big problem for him.

          But, good as that was, I still maintain that “Firefly” was the best.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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          • #2319906
            anonymous
            Guest

            Cannot compare a sequel to the original.  If not for the original there would be nothing.  TNG had stiff actors, no story lines, no continuity and non canon.

        • #2014224
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          I think I watch a half an episode , but I guess I fell into the trap of the superlative myself with my ‘best’. Such that look good and prove aweful, such disappointment..

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2014282
            wavy
            AskWoody Plus

            I should have said my above reply was in response to Cybertooths worst :Another Life !

            🍻

            Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2013956
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        After the Star Trek drought of the ’70s and most of the ’80s, I eagerly watched TNG when it came out, as well as Voyager and Deep Space 9. While TNG was a welcome return of the franchise, IMO the stories were of inconsistent quality, certainly less consistent from week to week than those of the original series. Some episodes I found rather sophomoric (sorry, couldn’t tell you any more what those episodes were, only my recollections from the time).

        And in my view, the major characters didn’t mesh together as well as those of the original series. It was more of a hodgepodge of moderately interesting characters. By contrast, the interplay between Kirk, Spock, and McCoy was almost Freudian in nature, where McCoy represented the id (emotional), Spock the ego (rational), and Kirk the superego balancing  their respective considerations. To quote a certain Vulcan, I found that interplay “fascinating.”  🙂

        Not that TNG was devoid of memorable moments. My favorite episode, because of its startling nature, was one where Beverly Crusher wandered about the Enterprise while chunks of the ship kept disappearing into nothingness.

        Don’t get me wrong: I did enjoy watching TNG. But the original ST provided more consistent enjoyment/enlightenment for me. As a friend once put it, the stories were morality plays, which had us thinking afterward. Much (most?) of the time after the end of a TNG episode, that  was the end of my engagement with the story.

         

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      • #2013993
        tonyl
        AskWoody Lounger

        Yup, the original Star Trek for me. Unless you’re counting Red Dwarf  of course.

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        • #2014271
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          Can’t say I have heard of that one, it on Netflix DVDS so maybe…

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2014283
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Wavy: ‘Red Dwarf’ is known in the USA just to the “most seriously into British TV” audiences. I used to watch it, now and again, on my local PBS station, that also replayed, every year until some years ago, (when SyFy bought the rights, but never did anything besides sitting on them) the whole of what was kept by the thrifty people at the BBC (after wiping out several tapes to reuse them for something else) of the old ‘Doctor Who’ in a double header with RD.

            RD was not too bad, but a step down from ‘Doctor Who’, in my opinion. I did not know it is now on Netflix. So you may watch it there and make up your own mind about it.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2014320
            tonyl
            AskWoody Lounger

            Erm…it’s a sitcom. Plenty available on YouTube if you want a quick taster.

      • #2014002
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Well, at least I can be very slightly happy that, so far, nobody has mentioned “Battlestar Galactica (reimagined)”. Because the less said about that one, the better. I actually liked the original Battlestar, the one created by a Mormon and with several hints (or so say those who have read it) to passages in the Book of Mormon. At least it was fun in a goofy sort of way, unpretentious, obviously low budget and using technology in their (presumably, with enough suspension of disbelief) super duper, tremendously advanced battle starships that was NOT mid-Twentieth Century, such as retro land-line chunky phones with rotary dials and wall clocks “to confuse the enemy” (and to save money on props?), according to the second version fans. The only consolation, in the middle of all the disappointments with the “reimagined” one, was President Roslin. But she was not enough. No, not even near enough.

        But I can’t imagine people, as boldly as you please, declaring that anything is better than Firefly. Is it possible that there are no Browncoats here at all? Oh, the humanity! And what about Futurama, huh? How about it?

        And I also liked “Supernova”, in BBC two; I saw a few episodes when I was staying in Newcastle for a while. Maybe I was the only one who enjoyed it? I really enjoyed the episode where they thought that they had seen God with one of their advanced telescopes (it was interference from a microwave  or something kike that) and wrote a paper about it, then all of them pressed on the “Return” key together to email it to  prestigious astronomical journal. I can really sympatize.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by OscarCP.
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        • #2014356
          JohnW
          AskWoody Plus

          I agree on Firefly!!! 🙂 Probably the saddest ever experience when that came to an end! 🙁

          But I have to admit that I did binge watch the new “Battlestar Galactica” (2004), with Katee Sackhoff, Edward Jmaes Olmos, & Tricia Helfer, etc. Guilty pleasure! 🙂

           

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          • #2014389
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            JohnW: I do appreciate you bravely coming out and expressing a wisely favorable opinion about the most magnificent  glory that was ‘Firefly’. Sadly to good for this world, shone so brightly but briefly in the clumsy hands of Fox producers. Much as befell Matt Groening’s amazing Futurama: more about the latter… later.

            As to your guilty feelings about liking ‘Battleship Galactic (reimagined)’, I have this to say: don’t be too hard on yourself — nobody is perfect! And do not forget that the way to repentance is always mercifully open to the fallen sinner. Who can always atone by watching ‘Futurama’, thus enriching the mind and enlarging the soul (Stephen Hawking himself participated in a couple of episodes, his robotic computer-generated voice most in agreement with the élan of the show)  And to those unfortunate few who do not know already about ‘Futurama’, please have peek here, and weep:

            https://slate.com/culture/2019/10/futurama-where-to-start-watching-nixon-head-episode.html

            The 11 Best FUTURAMA Episodes

            Presently available on DVD and, streaming, at Hulu, or so I’m told.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

            • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by OscarCP.
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          • #2306308
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            I agree on Firefly!!! 🙂 Probably the saddest ever experience when that came to an end! 🙁

            I’ve got DVD’s of the complete series of Firefly and also Serenity.  I too was very disappointed that it was cancelled, I wanted to see more of what the girl played by Summer Glau could do with her powers.  They really could have gone places with this show!

      • #2014006
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I vote for Black Mirror (not Netflix), Firefly, The 4400.

        • #2014285
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          I vote for Black Mirror (not Netflix), Firefly, The 4400.

          I thought I was going to like this one (on Netflix) but the first episode just turned me off, there is such a thing as a second chance however.

          Let me throw in not a “best” but a “worth it” : Dark. Its a time travel mystery type that you need ( at least for me) a score card to keep track, there are a few sires that help keep the characters straight in your head. New season (3rd) being filmed so it passes the one season wonder test of Ascaris!

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2306212
            doriel
            AskWoody Lounger

            I agree with @Alex5723 here – Black Mirror is the best and most interesting recently, although Red Dwarf and Futurama are funnier. I feel, that Black Mirror is not funny, but it is very “mindblowing” and original. Startrek was revolutionary, but its over the hill now.

            Aaand STARGATE! SG1 and Atlantis. I didnt watch Horizon, cuase I grew up 🙂

            PS – Futurama is funny for certain people, cause its mostly written by mathematicians and physicist (Groening and his coleagues).

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      • #2014043
        access-mdb
        AskWoody MVP

        I like DS9 and have been quite interested in the new ST Discovery. Another favourite of mine is Farscape. Firefly is quite good – however it suffered from being cancelled too soon. I’ve just started watching Serenity – no plot spoilers please.

        I like the fact that ST (pretty much all series) doesn’t take itself to seriously, with little asides taking the rise out of themselves. Tubes marked GNDN*, Jefferies Tubes after the set designer.

        David Ogden Stiers (Charles Winchester MASH 4077), appearing as Timcin, with 4077 appearing in the display in front of him. And there’s Q’s comments in All good things – ‘seven years of La Forge’s techno bubble”! The list is endless.

        *Goes nowhere, does nothing

        Every day is the dawn of a new error

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      • #2014142
        Vincenzo
        AskWoody Lounger

        Defiance, now on Amazon, deserves mention here.

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        • #2014296
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          Defiance was another excellent one!

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2014173
        Vincenzo
        AskWoody Lounger
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Vincenzo.
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      • #2014177
        Ascaris
        AskWoody MVP

        The original Twilight Zone is certainly in the upper part of the list. It opened the door for the later series, and a lot of it holds up well even today.

        I liked all of the Star Trek series and movies from the original series to the end of Voyager and Nemesis.  I never really got into Enterprise or any of the newer movies, though.

        I never saw Firefly, having never heard of it until long after it was canceled, and given how everyone says it was such a disappointment that it ended too soon, I don’t plan on seeing it or its movie spinoff, Serenity.  I’ve really come to loathe getting started on a series, finding I really like it, only to find that it was canceled.  Netflix is littered with one-season works in progress that will never be finished, and now I tend to avoid starting any series that hasn’t already run to completion.  The one-season ones don’t stand a chance… when I see they’ve only got one season, I just pass right by.

         

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.5 User Edition)

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        • #2014211
          Cybertooth
          AskWoody Plus

          If The Twilight Zone counts as science fiction, then it zooms right to the top of my list of favorite SF series. Right up there along with it go The Outer Limits and my personal favorite among “creepy TV” series, the underrated and largely forgotten One Step Beyond.

          Regarding single-season cancelled series, we were recently caught by this trap with the Canadian series Endgame. We greatly enjoyed it but were left dangling by the cliffhanger in what turned out to be the final episode, as the series got cancelled after the first season.

           

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        • #2014255
          Myst
          AskWoody Plus

          Twilight Zone ranks high with me, I have the entire collection. My cousin was in one or two episodes, then she went over to Mr Ed series, go figure. At least her Alfred Hitchcock appearance was a closer match with SciFi. Star Trek original series was great too.

          Win7 Home x64 MacOS Chromebook

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      • #2014218
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        This is Wavy’s fault ( #2013698 ), because he wrote elsewhere (and way off topic, I must add) that the best science fiction EVER is ‘The Expanse’, that one can watch right now in Amazon Prime.

        I disagree, most bitterly: The best science fiction show, ever, was “Firefly”:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefly_(TV_series)

        And, although it is harder to classify as such, the best SF show that lasted longer than one season was, unquestionably, ‘Futurama’:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurama

        Feel free to dissent here.

        • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by OscarCP.

        Well I will say that is a very strong contender for #2, just a little weak in the S part of SF. I will say it has my favorite theme music.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2014253
        Seattle27
        AskWoody Lounger
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Seattle27.
        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2014259
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          In answer to various misguided comments and some spot on ones: Yes! Doctor Who! Particularly, in my preferences, the old episodes from the 60’s and 70’s (which I religiously followed in Australia’s ABC when TV in Oz was still in marvelous black and white), that then was a show with the low-budget look and feel of having been filmed in “someone’s backyard” as a fellow Who fan once put it (I’ve liked Eccleston’s Who the most, in the current decently funded series.) Not to say it is best than ‘Firefly’, I would put it not too far behind ‘Futurama’…

          And in answer to Wavy’s contentious remark that “Well I will say that is a very strong contender for #2, just a little weak in the S part of SF. I will say it has my favorite theme music.

          Well, sure, the music and particularly the song are great (both performed by the genius that is Joss Wheedon (Buffy, Dollhouse) in his own guitar). But “a little weak in the S part of SF”? Seriously? It is the only TV SF series ever, as far as I can remember, where the spacecraft don’t make loud rumbling engine noises as they race by in the vacuum of space (OK: this show and ST). And have another look at the series’ pilot episode, where they go and plunder a derelict spaceship. Tell me, if you dare, that that is not as realistic as it can be (OK: except the part where they have some kind of artificial gravity aboard their own, Firefly-class ship, but the use of “rubber science” has been acceptable since its very beginning in SF as a plot device — e.g. H.G. Wells’ cavorite.)

          And, while ‘Firefly’ ended way to soon, the individual episodes are, each, among the best ever in their genre and the last one DOES NOT END IN A CLIFF-HANGER!.

          And ‘Farscape’ is definitely well up there. The ‘Twilight Zone’ is, properly speaking, more in the dark-fantasy and horror side of the plain fiction spectrum.

          I must also add that the very honorably third place in the “best SF shows ever” category unquestionably belongs to “Babylon V”.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • #2184161
          Seattle27
          AskWoody Lounger

          I recently stumbled upon the website pluto.tv , which has a ‘Classic Doctor Who’ channel (370), which shows nothing but that 24/7. (It’s free, and there a few repetitive advertisements, but not tons of ads.) Apparently they have about 200 episodes. It seems to be mostly Tom Baker episodes, Pertwee next most often, along with a few of the 1st doctor, some Peter Davison, and a couple Colin Baker & Sylvester McCoy episodes.

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          • #2188476
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Seattle27: Thanks for the tip about Pluto TV and classic Dr. Who. Looking into it I could not help being reminded of earlier-days Hulu,that was also for free and largely without ads, with a good collection of movies and shows available online. I wonder how extensive the movies’ collection is. But 200 shows of classical “Who” sounds like a promise of many good things.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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      • #2014270
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And, lest we forget, a big shout out for the ‘Outer Limits’. With one of the best ever SF episodes shown on TV: ‘Inconstant Moon’, that was based on a short story of the same name by Larry Niven (in his “All the Myriad Ways” anthology).

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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        • #2014309
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          I did not remember that one Oscar so I wikipediaed, it sounds like a good one. Those solar flares have a lot of potential to do great damage, I read that one in the 1800s knocked out Telegraph lines. There is much speculation what a direct hit would mean. Looks like a fast track to the Second Stone Age, for the few who survive the famine and resulting conflicts. I don’t think the highrise would help, a farm at least a hundred miles from a city, maybe.

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2014298
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        It seems we’ve touched on most of the good ones and I liked most of them.  The early SF shows were really hokey compared to later shows, but the first show I really got into was Outer Limits in the late 50’s and 60’s.  After that the next show I really liked a lot was Star Trek TOS (the original series).

        It’s a bit hard to pick one show as the “best ever”, but I’d have to say all of the Star Trek series.  Most were very well written (with exceptions of course) and entertaining.  I also must give an “honorable mention” to “The Sarah Connor Chronicles” which also ended too soon.  I’m a Terminator fan too.

      • #2014299
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        An honorable mention for the sadly truncated ‘Flashforward’. In my opinion its creators sin was to be burdened with too many plot twists: it would have been even better if they had stayed closer to the original story by Robert J. Sawyer.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2014310
        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        I put “Farscape” way up there on the list! Lots of favorites, though! 🙂

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      • #2014337
        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        Also worth an honorable mention: “The Orville” – TV series (2017-2020)

        “The Orville” is an American science fiction comedy-drama television series created by and starring Seth MacFarlane for the Fox Broadcasting Company.

        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5691552/

        A comedy-drama send up of Star Trek. Good times!!! 🙂

        Set 400 years in the future, the show follows the adventures of the Orville, a not-so-top-of-the-line exploratory ship in Earth’s interstellar Fleet. Facing cosmic challenges from without and within, this motley crew of space explorers will boldly go where no comedic drama has gone before.

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        • #2014518

          Firefly, hands down. May the boneheads who cancelled it broil in Date’s Level of Those Who Have Sinned Against Art.

           

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        • #2307026
          E Pericoloso Sporgersi
          AskWoody Plus

          I love “The orville”!  

          It makes me feel like the 30 years younger that I was when watching ST:TNG.

          It recaptures my mood like ST:TNG did, but with much better graphics, CGI and 16:9.

          One aspect is copied from Star Wars though: the “keep-your-hands-where-I-can-see-them” stance of Isaac is a straight copy of C3PO.

            Live long and stay safe.


      • #2014354
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And to include here some SF novels-almost-ready-for-their-TV-versions that I would like to watch on the small screen: Neil Stephenson’s ‘The Diamond Age’ and ‘Snow Crash’, as well as his recently published ‘Seveneves’, that is long enough to get the prequel, main show and sequel out of it. Many of Sawyer’s books. Several of Scalzi’s books, including the soon to be completed ‘Collapsing Empire’ trilogy, with the third book out next April. (And with certain words blipped out, as I would expect in this weirdly so-permissive-but-oh-so-straightlaced age we live in.)

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2014511
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Æon Flux by a country mile.

        cheers, Paul

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        • #2014658
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          Whats your opinion on the film version?

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2014918
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            Didn’t watch the film version. Part of the appeal was the manga style of cartoon.

            cheers, Paul

        • #2014704
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Paul_T: Oh, thank you so very much! That was the one I was trying to remember the name of and failed to do so! A splendid show, indeed!

          But not better than No. 1: ‘Firefly’; No. 2: Futurama, or even No. 3: ‘Babylon 5’…

          An outstandingly good candidate for No. 4, though!

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86on_Flux

          (The link looks funny (why?), but it is a good one — just hover the cursor on it and then you’ll see it in the clear. And, gentle reader, don’t you go and “look the other way” when you see the cry for help in the black bar on top of this — or any other — Wikipedia page these days.)

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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      • #2014523
        anonymous
        Guest

        My vote goes to Babylon 5 from J. Michael Straczynski.

        I has 110 episodes in 5 seasons.

        (A quote:  If you go to Z’ha’dum, you will die.)

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      • #2014711
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        No one is voting for Doctor Who ?

        • #2014728
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex 5723: ‘Doctor Who’ would have been a good candidate for No. 3, after the absolutely indisputable leaders, ‘Firefly’ and ‘Futurama’, had it not been for the overly-long tenure of the appropriately named David Tennant as the 10th Doctor. I never much cared for his (and Moffat’s) take on ‘Who’, although most of the show’s fans were always salivating (so to speak) so rapturously about him and those way too many episodes where he appeared.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2014732
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        For me, the John Pertwee era was the best of Dr Who (viewing from behind the couch at times) 😮
        ‘lost in space’ could be last or could it? Where did Dr smith get all his stuff from..sneaky sabateur

        W10, the itch you simply cannot scratch!
        • #2014741
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Patrick Troughton (2nd Doctor) , Tom Baker (4th Doctor), Chris Eccleston (9th Doctor) and Matt Smith (11th Doctor) rank about equally as the best of all Doctors, for me. Pertwee, that as I remember it, played the suavest (least cranky/wacky) Doctor and the first one shown in color TV, was pretty good, too.

          Now, when it comes to companions, the field is wide open for controversy.

          My vote, in no particular order of precedence, goes to: Romana I, Tegan, Rose Tylor, Amy Pond and Riversong. And K9, of course.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2014757
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            ah, for us that would be a wooden PYE color CRT TV with 6 channel buttons and 3 terrestrial TV channels..
            this was one of the longest visuals I’d seen on the BBC, often thought the sound was broken
            testcard

            W10, the itch you simply cannot scratch!
            Attachments:
            • #2014822
              tonyl
              AskWoody Lounger

              Her face is beginning to ache from holding that smile…

              • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by tonyl.
              • #2014960
                tonyl
                AskWoody Lounger

                Hmm…tried to attach a picture to that but couldn’t get it to work. Try googling “Carole Hersee”.

                • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by tonyl.
      • #2014775
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Speaking of StarWars Disney plus now has The Mandalorian streaming. I think I will wait for one season to be complete and binge watch on my free trial.

        BTW reading the Privacy statement I am surprised I will not have to submit a cheek swab and retinal scan..🤬

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2014787
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          About ‘The Mandalorian’: I have been reading some good things about it, but from doing that, have found no indication, so far, that there is anything really humorous in it. If there is, and plenty, I might wait to buy the DVDs, if Disney ever decides to start releasing them. Otherwise I have no interest in yet another dark, grubby and depressing story (with plenty of jumping around, shooting, blasting and gory killings) that is what, way too often, passes, these days, as profound and serious drama.

          So, Wavy, please, let me know what you make of it, if you go ahead and start watching.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2014793
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Gonna be a month or so but Much of the social media reaction has been to the show's breakout character, a 50-year old "infant" of Yoda's species that The Mandalorian initially takes for a bounty but ends up becoming its de facto guardian in order to protect it after it has shown to have the powers of The Force. The character has been nicknamed "Baby Yoda",[11] a misnomer since Yoda himself died of old age in Return of the Jedi before the events of the series. The unexpected popularity of "Baby Yoda" led to an explosion of merchandise for the Christmas and holiday season, which quickly sold out.[75][76][77] from Wikipedia
        😏

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2014851
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Question: Does anyone here know if there is some place on the Web where one can find either the script, or some decent animation based on the (script by Douglas Adams of one episode of Doctor Who to be called ‘Shada’ that, of course, never got to be aired, first, because of labor strikes and, afterwards, because of why not? There were in circulation, back in 2017, rumors that a new partially animated version (with the few “live” parts that got to be filmed with the actual actors and with parts that were pure animation filling in the gaps) was going to be released on DVD and one-time digital download.

        There was also, many years ago, an animated version that was, I’m sorry to say, unwatchable, because it was on a BBC’s server that must have been actually a Commodore PC pressed into service for this purpose. Download rate was something like one bit per month, more or less — in a really good month, that is.

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        • #2014889
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Screen-Shot-2019-12-05-at-12.15.19-AM

          Well, surprise, surprise. The video of “Shada” is available from Amazon Prime, for $ 2.99! I’ve bought and watched it and is, as expected, a combination of live action (the parts that were actually filmed) and as animation the ones that were in the script but never got to be actually shot. Both live action and animation blend very nicely, the voices of the animated parts are those of the actual actors, and the animation is OK, not terrific but serviceable. As it was always in Doctor Who in its “classic” epoch, so the style of the animation fits well with the very slow moving alien monsters, the basic pyrotechnic effects, the obvious fade outs when someone disappears into another dimension and the rest of it.

          And the whole thing bears the unmistakable imprint of Douglas Adams’ deadpan wit throughout all 2 hours and twenty seven minutes of it.

           

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          Attachments:
      • #2014925
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Whats your opinion on the film version?

        i liked the film version and have it saved in my movie collection.

        • #2014931
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          ‘Aeon Flux’, the movie, was panned by the critics, getting 9% out 100% from them in Tomatometer and a 39% “d***ing with faint praise” from the viewers, but I did not see it myself, so I don’t have a personal opinion.

          The original animated  TV show was, from a graphical point of view, very nicely done; shown on MTV in the early through mid 90s, the series came as a shock to audiences that had never seen something quite like it on TV before. It was a trailblazer for adult-themed TV shows, such as those playing, years later, on the Cartoon Network progrm “Adult Swim”. How ‘Aeon Flux’ may impress someone watching the TV show these days is probably going to be probably rather different from what it was when first seen on MTV, as plenty of water has flowed under the bridge since those days.

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          • #2015046
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            If you have Adult Swim it is worth checking out Rick and Morty. It reminds me of Quads in that it goes places most would consider too far.

            cheers, Paul

            • #2015227
              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              In reference to Paul_T  ( #2015046 ) who wrote “If you have Adult Swim it is worth checking out Rick and Morty. It reminds me of Quads in that it goes places most would consider too far.

              First things first: Thanks!

              Now, three things I feel must write here:

              (1) First of all: apologies all around for misplacing my entry on ‘Aeon Flux’ in the middle of an exchange on the ‘Mandalorian’. (Also, I’m not really sure that AF was science fiction, it could be equally well described as belonging to a genre all its own.)

              (2) ‘Adult Swim’ is a jewel and a shining light of indie rebelliousness in a world swamped with pretentious, pompous and toxic arrant nonsense both on TV and pretty much everywhere that, these days, with the amazingly widespread use of cell phones, is used by probably most people, even in the poorest and, or most backward places, to get their news, catch a show, or to communicate among themselves.

              (3) As per (2) above, ‘Adult Swim’ was the place where Matt Groening’s slyly subversive science fiction show ‘Futurama’ took refuge during its long exile and where it was replayed in its entirety, for years and years, after the Fox ‘suits’ cancelled it one star-crossed day that shall forever live in infamy, because they could, having failed to kill it less obviously already, poisoning its Nielsen ratings by scheduling it at the most unwatchable times, or right after some big championship game where the follow-up commentary was likely to run overtime. That worked a treat for them, so they did the same thing again when they decided to get rid of ‘Firefly’.

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2014926
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        About ‘The Mandalorian’

        I am watching ‘The Mandalorian’ and think it is just OK, nothing special.

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      • #2014953
        access-mdb
        AskWoody MVP

        Ahh, Douglas Adams – therefore let’s not forget Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. First the brilliant radio show, the great TV series and the film, which was good. To those of us who listened to the radio series, the following attempts were a bit lacking. This was because of those who played the parts were indelibly marked on our memories (well it was for me!)

        Peter Jones as the guide was just too good. Was it really 1978 it was broadcast? And 1981 the TV series? Wow!

        Every day is the dawn of a new error

        • #2015010
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          For many years, I only knew of Adams’ ‘Hitchhiker’ books, which I read one after the other as they came out. They were very popular and I had a number of conversations about them with perfect strangers that had read them and now saw me reading one, or else were reading one themselves, while on a train, ferry, or in other situations that bring together people that do not know each other and have nothing much else to do but wait for long stretches of time.

          The movie was something of a disappointment, but later on I concluded that this was inevitable, because much of the books’ charm is in the observations and comments of the author, rather than in the action. The dialog is also part of that charm, but the only part of it that can be readily put in a movie.

          I haven’t seen the TV show, but I imagine that my comment on the movie applies also to it, for the same reason.

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        • #2015248
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          The movie was so-so. The books were good, I still remember the game on my first computer, I think I still have the ‘Don’t Panic’ pin that came with it. I think I was only able to listen to one radio episode.
          Thanks for all the fish! 🐟🐬

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2037006
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I just found out about the new “Next Generation” follow-on series that premiers next month in “CBS All Access”. Judging by the highly refined and therefore expensive looks of it, this show is being produced by CBS in the hope that it will become a “tent pole” show that might prop up the so far indifferent success of their several-years-old streaming service. To me, the main question, given that CBS offers only a one-week of free streaming for people to make up their minds about subscribing or not, is whether the show could be worth the around $120 a year subscribing to “All Access” at about $10 a month, primarily to follow the show for as long as it keeps going (I already subscribe to Netflix and Amazon Prime and get from these two as much or more of entertainment that I am able to consume). Something that, according to Patrick Stewart, is envisaged to be up to six seasons.

        In this reboot, besides some new characters, Picard, Data, Riker, Deana Troy and Seven of Nine are coming back and are going to be played by the original actors, now considerably older. But aging is something both inevitable and, according to this stylish teaser, something that will be handled so is not a problem that will get in the way of enjoying the show:

        https://www.cbs.com/shows/star-trek-picard/video/Fxa2ERi0Lo0gytFEWAzYTrbRndYqXrEj/star-trek-picard-nycc-trailer-cbs-all-access/

        Waning: To watch the teaser one has to turn the add-blocker off for that page. However,  after I did that, no ads appeared. So it is possible that this is a site-wide policy of “All Access” that is not relevant to this teaser but the pop up comes up  anyway.

        Some pre-review of the show, here:

        ‘Star Trek: Picard’ Trailer: Data, Riker and Troi Reunite With Their Former Captain

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      • #2037277
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        whether the show could be worth the around $120 a year subscribing to “All Access” at about $10 a month, primarily to follow the show for as long as it keeps going

        Considering Star Trek: Discovery & Star Trek: Picard seem to be the only remotely interesting things offered I will not be jumping, HULU and Prime both offer more. I am getting tired of the junk on Netflix so I may have to make the decision to add one soon. Free trials would be good for a ‘network’ with only two shows.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2037287
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        “War of the Worlds”  w/ Orson wells

        • #2037300
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          DriftyDonN: Welles “War of the Worlds” was a radio broadcast, not a TV show.

          It is a tribute to Welles’ genius that he knew so spectacularly well how to push the buttons of such credulous folk as inhabited the great USA in the distant past of 1938. And it is a tribute to how much we have matured and improved ourselves since then that these days… Oh, scratch that!

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      • #2188499
        anonymous
        Guest

        Not precisely TV show, but once opened the debate and topic, I propose this two remarkable films as the best Science Fiction movies ever. Do you agree? Then enjoy ’em:

        1.- Metropolis (Fritz Lang – 1927)

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8huGJO7po_A

        2.- Soylent Green (Richard Fleischer – 1973)

        https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3dq3ef

         

        • #2188798
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I am of two minds about “Metropolis”. It is now a classic and, in many ways, it was a breakthrough, bringing science fiction from the swamp of pulp-fiction to the movies in a memorable way (cities with very high skyscrapers connected by sky-ways and so forth that became staples of the genre) and dealing with a philosophical serious issue: the ultimate consequences of entrenched social inequality (by the way, that was best done by H.G. Wells in his novel “The Time Machine”, but this thread is, by default, about movies and TV shows.) “Metropolis” (Fritz Lang’s, not the much more recent anime movie) was panned by the critics when it first came out, and I tend to agree with them, for having some twists and turns that are, quite frankly, rather silly. I subscribe to Netflix DVD’s service and asked for it and watched this movie again, recently. This did not resolve my doubts.

          Although I have heard many times about “Soylent Green”, I have not had the opportunity to watch it.

          So, to have a go at this myself:

          How about “Moon”

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twuScTcDP_Q

          and “GATTACA”?

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpzVFdDeWyo

           

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      • #2306054
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        I have to say that one of the movies that made a huge impact on me was the very first Star Trek Movie.  I was already hooked on Star Trek TOS, and the movie at that time was a real treat to watch for me.  I was awed by the 12 minute tour Admiral Kirk was given by Scotty in a shuttle craft of the entire newly “refitted” Enterprise NCC 1701.  The gantry, lights, welding sparks, workers doing somersaults, and the close up views the that enormous ship.  It was breathtaking in 1978!

        • #2312906
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I remember in particular the sequence when the Enterprise moves slowly along the huge alien spacecraft with its seemingly endless series of strange, mysterious and impressive sights. In fact, everything that was shown near, at the entrance and within this spacecraft was both remarkable and dramatically surprising. A real imaginative tour de force.

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      • #2306061
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        not the best Sci-Fi but the movie worth a mention in these current times:
        cocoon
        I’m sure we’d all like to take a dip in that swimming pool now, if only eh..
        If you haven’t seen it, watch it, was a very underated film directed by Ron Howard (Happy Days) from 1985.

        W10, the itch you simply cannot scratch!
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        • #2306067
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          Oh my yes!  Get rid of my aches and pains and have youthful energy again.  That was a very enjoyable movie indeed.

      • #2306073
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        As Cybertooth said:  “Regarding single-season cancelled series, we were recently caught by this trap with the Canadian series Endgame. We greatly enjoyed it but were left dangling by the cliffhanger in what turned out to be the final episode, as the series got cancelled after the first season.”

        This has become more and more widespread, and it seems to always happen to the really good Science Fiction TV shows!  I’ve lost track of how many SF shows I’ve gotten interested in and liked very much only to have them cancelled.  I remember when a TV season was 20 to 26 episodes (or more for the older shows).  Nowadays you’re lucky to get 10!

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        • #2306087
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Charlie, This cancellation issue you discuss is, sadly, intrinsic to how the making of these shows is funded. Many Science Fiction shows, to be worth watching, have to rely on a good deal of expensive special effects.

          Those making the decisions in Commercial TV judge the likely future profitability of keeping a show going for another season on the number of viewers that have been following it during the current one, as a large number is, naturally, a good basis for selling ads to paying businesses that may want to have them placed in that show.

          Besides one-season shows, there are those, such as “Futurama”, that have a decrease of the number of viewers below what seems financially acceptable to the network deciders. If the show has been going already for several seasons and has acquired a solid core of devoted (and probably very vocal) viewers, but not one numerous enough to justify continuing the show, as in the case of “Futurama”, the way it is terminated could be more subtle: scheduling the show broadcast at a really bad time of day on a bad day of the week. For example just before a game of baseball or of some other sport that is likely to run overtime and cause the broadcast of the weekly episode to be cancelled:

          https://www.wired.com/2013/04/futurama-cancelled-again/

          On the other hand, subscription streaming sites such as Netflix have to recover the cost of making the shows from their paid subscribers’ money. That places a limit on what the executives responsible to make the decision to keep a show going are willing to accept to decide to renew it for another season.

          In the case of cancellations in non-commercial TV, the reasons tend to be related to reshuffles of the executives running the show and, or to internal network politics.

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          • #2306242
            wavy
            AskWoody Plus

            Netflix seems to cancel after 2 ‘seasons’. They want to see binge watchers complete a season to finance the next. For them the contracts they write give the producers much more $$ the longer the show continues, right up to the point of “well we can’t make $$ off of that!!”. Sad but true.
            I was hoping that improved/cheaper CGI would change metrics. Does not seem to be there yet.

            🍻

            Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2306094
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        Yeah, it’s always about money these days.  I remember when Star Trek TNG went for seven seasons and each season had 20 some episodes.  Same can be said for Star Trek Voyager, Stargate SG1, and Stargate Atlantis.  All these shows had high tech special effects and were aired in the 80’s and 90’s.

        • #2306111
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Charlie, “money” is pretty important for commercial TV and also streaming services such as Netflix. The profitability of a show to the broadcaster matters a good deal to the business that makes the shows possible, so making sure that really profitable shows are kept and those not profitable enough are not, is part of what I think of as doing “due diligence.”

          But money sometimes is a mere excuse for someone higher ups disliking a show for their own reasons and sabotaging it, as was the  case with “Firefly.” While there was an arc or overall story spanning most episodes, although each could be watched enjoyably on their own, but with some confusion to reduce the pleasure, the invisible hand of someone whose name only recently has been revealed, shuffled the episodes like a pack of cards and had them shown in the resulting disorder. No wonder the ratings stayed low enough to justify cancellation.

          But I am not here to bury Fox TV, but to praise (sort of) some new shows on TV and streaming:

          (1) “Away”, on Netflix, is about the first imaginary crew to make the first imaginary journey to Mars.

          It has some jaw-dropping special effects, with people moving in free fall, or zero g, for most of the episodes already shown. At least when it comes to the action in outer space. Otherwise, the show goes on and on about problems between the crew and the captain and between the captain and his family back on Earth.

          Now I understand that, since a trip to Mars using, as in this show, a conventional rocket-ship to get there, is supposed to take months and months and, therefore, episodes and episodes to be told before the crew actually lands on our next biggish neighbor away from the Sun. And that filling those episodes with the crew’s technical work and the occasional emergency is going to get old pretty fast. But why should it be so much about interpersonal issues? I invariably find these in any show both boring and annoying, because they are invariable the result of fairly banal peeves.

          The show is a recent one and there is some hope that, as it keeps going, it will find its legs one of these days. That couldn’t happen soon enough for me, but I am willing to wait, for now.

          “Piccard” on Apple TV + : I have not seen it, so you tell me. It’s like a “postquel” to “Star Trek, The Next Generation”, with the same main actors now no better for wear after some thirty years since the very last episode. STTNG was my favorite “Star Trek” reimagining, and the main actors were all pretty good, so maybe they still are: you tell me.

          As to books — and why not?, some books even get made into TV shows, movies and streaming video series, as the ones I am about to mention here have been.

          I have been reading, after “His Dark Materials” the next, still unfinished trilogy with only two books out already: “The Book of Dust.” Phillip Pullman’s ongoing saga has a sprinkle of “quantum” dust (pun intended) and parallel universes, but it is mostly a fantasy story with some very light science fictional touches. And with an underlying, if lightly sprinkled throughout the first trilogy, allegory of Milton’s “Paradise Lost.” I mention all this here so, if you did not know about this work already (as I didn’t until PK and some others brought them to my attention during a discussion started by Charlie), all I can say is that you could do worse than to read one of these novels, preferably the first one: “The Golden Compass” (a.k.a “Northern Lights” in the  UK and in Oz.) Now I am going to state clearly and unambiguously here that, for something written in Oxford by an Oxford man, it is a lot more fun to read than another series of very popular (for reasons that escape me entirely) fantasy novels written by another Oxford man…  Now, come at me, all ye Ringers, if you dare. On the other hand, you have  had all your adored novels made into movies, Pullman’s only just the first one: “The Golden Compass,” that many who read the book first did not like. Having not read the book at the time, I liked it. So, there you have it.

          Now, it’s your move.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2306140
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            I know this is going to sound like a very simple answer but I always thought the sponsors whose commercials we’re forced to endure provided the money for a TV show.  Sponsors should make more money nowadays since most people now have and pay for cable. Then in addition that, they still make cable subscribers watch commercials! This is why I refuse to pay for cable.

            I used to be able to stream video for awhile, but now everything is HD and I don’t have a high enough bandwidth to do HD without waiting every 7 seconds for buffering.  I am planning to get a fiber optic Internet & phone connection soon.

            I saw “The Golden Compass” movie and liked it, and then read the books.  The books do take you into a much “darker” story toward the end.

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      • #2306101
        RamRod
        AskWoody Plus

        Best Science Fiction Series:

        1. Lost in Space
        2. Space 1999
        3. Twilight Zone
        4. STTOS
        5. STTNG

        Best Science Fiction Movies:

        1. Star Wars
        2. The Martian
        3. Gravity
        4. 2001 A Space Odyssey
        5. Logan’s Run

        Best Science Fiction Movie Yet to be Made:

        1. The Foundation Series by Isaac Asimov
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        • #2306120
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          “Destination Moon.”

          “Forbidden Planet.”

          “The Day the Earth Stood Still.”

          “The War of the Worlds.”

          In my opinion,these movies, back in the 50’s, set the standard for science fiction worth watching, because they were about things strongly felt, feared or longed for by most people in our own planet. I can say that “Destination Moon”, which I saw when I was a little boy, got me, eventually, to NASA.

          And lest we forget:

          “The Planet of the Apes.”

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Destination_Moon_(film)

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forbidden_Planet

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          • #2306141
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            These are all good, “The day the Earth Stood Still” and the original “War of the Worlds” are two of my favorites.

      • #2306150
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And now for my list of science fiction shows and movies I wished someone made (and made well) based on these books:

        Edgar Poe: “The Narrative of Gordon Pym of Connecticut.”

        H. P. Lovecraft: “In the Mountains of Madness.” (*)

        Ray Bradbury’s “Martian Chronicles.” (**)

        Arthur C Clarke: “Childhoods’ End.”

        Isaac Asimov’s: “Foundation and Empire” (The two-part novel with the “Mule” in the second one.) (***)

        The first four, in particular, are about the enigma of time and the vastness of space and who  or what may lurk out there and what their designs, beneficent or otherwise, for us might be; with the first two emphasizing the strange and incomprehensible grandeur and cosmic terror of a purely material and, towards us, utterly indifferent and pitiless universe.

        (*) Guillermo del Toro has been making noises for several years now that he is going to make a movie out of this Lovecraft’s novel, one so terrifyingly subversive of our illusions of what the  material world around us is really like, that it seems made just for someone like him to take successfully to the big screen.

        (**) Many years ago there was a TV show with episodes based on Bradbury’s book. Not a bad one, in my opinion.

        (***) Asimov’s story is about a shift-changing genius of an imp whose ultimate goals are nothing like what his engaging persona makes them appear to be. And it carries also a not-so subtle warning of the dangers presented by crowd-pleasing politicians that cleverly disguise their despotic aspirations, waiting for the main chance to make their move — something of a “thing” with Asimov.

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      • #2306167
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        And now for my list of science fiction shows and movies I wished someone made (and made well) based on these books:

        Arthur C Clarke: “Childhoods’ End.”

        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4146128/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

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      • #2306170
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I am not sure many will categorize this movie as SF, but I do and in my movie collection this movie is at the top with 10/10.

        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0756683/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

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        • #2306201
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Alex, please add a description to your links.

          cheers, Paul

        • #2306298
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex, I haven’t seen or heard of this movie before, but the article in Wikipedia is interesting enough to see if I can see t, perhaps Netflix has it in its DVD collection, or it might be available for free from Amazon Prime:

          The Man from Earth is a 2007 American drama sicence fiction film written by Jerome Bixbi and directed by Richard Schenkman. It stars David Lee Smitth as John Oldman, the protagonist. The screenplay was conceived by Jerome Bixby in the early 1960s and completed on his deathbed in April 1998.

          The screenplay mirrors similar concepts of longevity which Bixby had introduced in “Requiem for Methuselah”, a Star Trek episode he wrote which originally aired in 1969. The film gained recognition in part for being widely distributed through Internet peer-to-peer networks, which raised its profile. The film was later adapted by Schenkman into a stage play of the same name.”

          The plot focuses on “John Oldman”, a departing university professor, who claims to be a “Cro-Magnon” (or “Magdalenian”, a caveman) who has secretly survived for more than 14,000 years. The entire film is set in and around Oldman’s house during his farewell party and is composed almost entirely of dialogue. The plot advances through intellectual arguments between Oldman and his fellow faculty members.

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          • #2306355
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Yes, I’ve checked and the DVD of “The Man From Earth” is available from Netflix, and I already have added it to my queue of the movie DVDs that I’ll be watching.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2306204
        A1ex
        AskWoody Plus

        The Quatermass Experiment from 1953 beats all the above.
        It had me hiding behind the couch, even the theme music (Mars from Holst’s Planets Suite)
        was frightening.

        A1ex

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      • #2306209
        Matador
        AskWoody Plus

        Movie:  The Thing (1982)

        TV series: Dr Who  (Pertwee, Baker era)

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        • #2306213
          NaNoNyMouse
          AskWoody Lounger

          I know Douglas Adams has already been mentioned here, and I know it’s parody rather than straight sci-fi (although the same could be said about Futurama and Red Dwarf too), but I haven’t seen Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy on any lists yet

          The 1978 Radio Series, of course, not the TV version (so-so), the film (abominable), the game (a game), or the books (books). Our younger audience probably doesn’t even know what a radio series even IS. What, you just sit there and listen to it? No special effects or nuffink?

          Yeah, it’s all a rather dated lifetime away now, but the radio series has some special memories for me personally. No special effects or nuffink, but it made you use your imagination…

          • This reply was modified 6 months, 3 weeks ago by NaNoNyMouse.
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        • #2306316
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          “The Thing” is another excellent example of “horror + science fiction.” Really, really scary, particularly because it takes place in an isolated base in Antarctica, from where no safe escape is possible. Same as in a spaceship in outer space, in the middle of nowhere, as in “Alien.”

          The Baker years of “Dr. Who” are most memorable to me because:

          (1) I watched some of the episodes in a black and white TV, before color TV came to Australia.

          (2) The production values were really bad, with supposedly horrible monsters that looked like they were made of papier mache and moved really, really slowly their evil works to commit. Someone once told me that, in her opinion, the studio sets were somebody’s back yard.

          (3) Tom Baker was really good in his own interpretation of a sort of mature but wacky Doctor.

          (4) It had some really good looking companions (and some good-at-acting ones too).

          (5) It had Daleks.

          (6) It had K-9

           

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          • #2306381
            Matador
            AskWoody Plus

            Wasn’t Davros just great and not to mention Lynx (the spud-head villian)

            Good memories.

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      • #2306289
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        loads of excellent sci-fi here, i also enjoyed Andromeda with Kevin Sorbo as Captain Dylan Hunt in reruns on Comet channel, and Alien with Sigourney Weaver and Veronica Cartwright (Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The X-Fles.)

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        • #2306291
          PKCano
          Manager

          I liked the first Andromeda seasons.
          But when the Avatar turned into a ninja………

          • #2306297
            anonymous
            Guest

            ? says:

            ah, Rommie she has a certain jenna se quoi, no?

             

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            • #2306301
              PKCano
              Manager

              I liked her better before she was “upgraded.”

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              • #2306303
                Microfix
                AskWoody MVP

                bit like windows then eh 🙂

                W10, the itch you simply cannot scratch!
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            • #2306302
              Charlie
              AskWoody Plus

              Yes!

              • #2306323
                anonymous
                Guest

                ? says:

                well, yes and no. Rommie played by actress Lexa Doig (insert stock photo here) and her husband Michael Shanks (Stargate-SG1) met on set while filming “Star Crossed.”  She became with child at the start of season 5 and was written out for two-thirds of the season, hence her “upgrade.” nothing beats life imitating art.

              • #2306334
                Charlie
                AskWoody Plus

                She also played the doctor on Stargate SG1.  I was glad to see her pretty face there too.  I didn’t know she was married to Micheal Shanks.

              • #2306342
                OscarCP
                AskWoody Plus

                Now, my memory, who knows, might be slowing down, but it still retains the really important facts. And when it comes to who is the best ever looking actress in a TV series, I have absolutely no doubt that prize goes to: Morena Baccarin as Inara Serra, the high class courtesan in “Firefly.”

                Screen-Shot-2020-10-22-at-5.57.39-PM

                (I hope this picture comes out here looking right…)

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              • #2306348
                Charlie
                AskWoody Plus

                Yes indeed Oscar, I agree.  She was also in Stargate SG1.

              • #2306350
                OscarCP
                AskWoody Plus

                Charlie: SG1, yes, she was there too, thanks for reminding me.

                Unfortunately for her, the only important role on TV she ever got beside the one in SG1, was in the high production values, one-season-and-then-gone remake of “V” that, just like the original “V”, although it might have looked much better, it was still a dog of a science fiction TV show. And her role was like a sort of nasty alien queen that looked human when she wished to, but was really a hideous reptile-like creature. To put Baccarin in such a role was a true sacrilege.

                After that, as far as I know, her next important role was, a few years back, as the frazzled girlfriend of Deadpool in the movie of the same name (which I really liked, by the way). And she went and got killed, way too early, in Deadpool II (that I also really liked) …

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        • #2306292
          RamRod
          AskWoody Plus

          Was Alien, and its successors, a Science Fiction movie or a Horror movie set in space?

          Was The Blob a Science Fiction movie or a Horror movie with the antagonist from off world?

          What is Science Fiction?

          Cheers!

          • #2306300
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            The Alien series was IMO 35% science fiction and 65% Horror.  The Blob was again IMO a 50’s teen drive-in movie. It had Steve McQueen in it though.

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      • #2306305
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        RamRod: “Alien” and “Aliens” were horror science fiction movies set in space. Many science fiction movies and stories are also horror ones, because what happens in the darkness of outer space can be scary enough without even trying. This melding of genres goes back to well before the “Alien” publicity statement, in the late 70’s, that “In space, nobody can hear you scream.” And the idea of “horror science fiction” is still going on strong, as “Strange Things”, etc. show quite clearly.

        Now, in my opinion, “The Blob” and others of similar artistic achievement, such as “The Invasion of the Killer Tomatoes”, belong among the most famous sort-of science fiction B-Movies ever, not so much among the best Science Fiction movies ever.

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      • #2306351
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Matador #2306209 : I forgot to mention in my comments on “The Thing” and on the “Doctor Who” of the Baker years that I was replying to one of yours where you mentioned those two examples of memorable science fiction TV shows and movies.

        Sorry, Matador. And thanks.

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      • #2306352
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And here is a big shout out for “Battlestar Galactica.”

        To be clear, not the 2004 TV series, a “reimagined” version of the original 1978 one, but the original 1978 one, credited primarily to Glen A. Larson. Who was a Mormon, and so people have over the years commented on certain Mormon-themed elements of this TV series. No big deal, in my opinion. I had to have them pointed out to notice.

        Which, unlike the 2004 follow-on, while it was also about a mass journey, or migration, or escape, to nowhere in particular and that also ended getting nowhere in particular, was in fact fun, in a goofy sort of way. Without the pretensions of high drama and minus the completely gratuitous soft p**n the follow-on was so generously sprinkled with. Not to mention all that retro, ca. 1960’s tech in the follow-on. The plot never made much sense, anyway, so why double down on its silliness?

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        • #2306385
          anonymous
          Guest

          ? says:

          wait oscar before we go, you gotta check out Dust
          https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7sDT8jZ76VLV1u__krUutA

          and thanks for yet another exciting topic!

          • #2306393
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Thanks, anonymous: “Dust” looks very interesting: a streaming  channel with a collection of 10 – 15 minute short films on a variety of science fictional topics, some that look worthy of having a look at.

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        • #2306863
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          And here is a big shout out for “Battlestar Galactica.”

          Yes indeed. I was 29 going on 30 in 1978 and this show was one I really looked forward to watching.  The camaraderie of the Galactica crew, the neat voices of Cylon Centarians, and of course the beautiful women which included Jane Seymour and Anne Lockhart.  It was a very entertaining space show, and though they didn’t show them finally getting to Earth, the sequel show to it did.  I enjoyed the sequel too, but not as much as the original.

      • #2306378
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Now the melding of Science Fiction and Horror has been discussed here and brought to an, at least, amicable conclusion.

        But the melding of Science Fiction and other artistic forms should also be given serious consideration. In particular the melding of Science Fiction and Grand Opera, especially when it is an alien work performed by actual aliens.

        Such is the case of the very famous  “Klingon Opera”, sang here in Klingon in a justly renowned performance by Klingon artists of both Federation and Klingon Empire renown that now I am very happy and deeply honored to bring to you for your enjoyment, spiritual uplift and personal refinement:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmQGO5U2n6s

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      • #2306386
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        RamRod has listed the, as he sees it, best science fiction movies, and put “Gravity” there.

        I agree that, in general, this is a pretty good science fiction movie. But when it comes to the understanding of gravity shown by those responsible for it … not so much.

        You see, as it says in  my profile, I work (among other things) “on satellite orbits” or, more precisely, on the very accurate calculation of satellite orbits: to find, within less than a couple of inches, the true position of the satellite at any time. This is necessary, for example, when taking very precise measurements of the shape of the surface below with a radar or laser altimeter on a satellite, bouncing its radio or light beam off the surface and measuring the time it takes to come back. That, multiplied by the speed of light and divided by two gives the distance to the surface, but the distance from where? Here is where knowing the position of the satellite to better than the precision of the measurement comes in. And where I come in. The main force that shapes an orbit is gravity, so I have had to learn and get to understand reasonably well how gravity works.

        So what is the problem I see with gravity in “Gravity”? In an interview with Phil Plait (I think it was) in “Bad Astronomy”, Neil deGrasse Tyson explained what he thought was wrong with “Gravity’s” gravity and so brought that to my attention.

        You see, the most dramatic moment in the movie is when George Clooney and Sandra Bullock are hanging together, but only one can make the final jump back to the crippled space station and for that to be possible, the other must let go. And this other has to be the Clooney character. But, as presented in the movie, letting go also means falling down and down towards Earth, to burn down to a shiny cloud of very hot plasma when finally hitting the atmosphere.

        So Clooney lets go, heroically, and starts to fall, very slowly at first. But with enough time before his fiery reentry to make a fine farewell speech.

        Except that not only such a fall is not possible, but a thing much more interesting and dramatic as well should have happened, making the movie even more arresting — but with the theater’s personnel only allowing entrance to members of the public if they first agreed to being carded.

        What should have happened is this: both Bullock and Clooney, before they separated were in exactly the same orbit around the Earth. When they did separate, Clooney got a little push and went into a slightly different orbit. But was still in orbit and not falling down to Earth. Also the effect of residual air around would have pushed him, ever so slightly, into a very slowly more and more different orbit. The difference would be that he would be sometimes a bit higher, sometimes a bit lower, sometimes a bit to the right, sometimes a bit to the left of Bullock, now safely inside, for the moment, of the space station after reaching it when Clooney let go of her. In other words: he would have been going in slowly changing circles around Bullock, never out of sight but also never out of radio contact. So, instead of just moving quickly away, as in the movie, soon to be so far as to loose radio contact and not be heard anymore by Bullock, he would have been always present to her and being heard by her: first his heroic words, then, increasingly, his heavy breathing, then his gasping, then his desperately gulping for air, then silence at last. But the corpse will still be in plain sight, going around and around in a sort of endless danse macabre around and in sight of Bullock.

        Much more interesting than what happens in the movie, don’t you think?

         

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      • #2306392
        AlexEiffel
        AskWoody_MVP

        Movies : Solaris (1976) and Stalker (1979) from Tarkovski, those are on top for me.

        Clockwork Orange and 2001 from Kubrick.

        The Thing (1982) from Carpenter.

        Maybe Blade Runner and Back to the future + The fly and other Cronenberg work.

        On the more popular side, Madmax (2015), terminator 1 and 2, the first Star Wars IV, Robocop, Ex Machina, The Matrix and Alien(s), although they are not on the same artistic level, I find.

        There is a special place in my heart for Dune, even if has big flaws.

        The not that good but still memorable Idiocracy too.

        Shows : I enjoyed Babylon V as a teenager and young adult. Star-Trek to a certain extent although I never found it great. I enjoyed Battlestar Galactica a bit more, but still didn’t find it as good as the best series I watched. Never saw Firefly or Dr Who, I should.

        I find there isn’t that many great sci-fi movies and series, unfortunately. I hope the new foundation show will be good.

        And to answer Ramrod’s question, in my book, science-fiction should have a link to an apparently plausible universe, parallel or future, unlike fantasy which doesn’t have this requirement. The fact that it is not scientifically possible doesn’t bother me as long as it is not grossly obvious, but some purists might want this criteria met more strictly. I suppose the more of a scientist you are too, the more some problems are obvious and annoying to you. Themes of space, technology, alternate plausible realities are in. Elves are out because they don’t have a come from another planet explanation.

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        • #2306395
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex Eiffel, I agree with your choices of the first movies you mentioned as being among the great classics, not just of science fiction, but of the cinema, period. But I also think that “The Matrix” (the first movie in the series by the Wachowski sisters) is a great action movie full of interesting ideas. Or, to be more precise, it is the greatest and the best Cyberpunk science fiction movie ever made, in my opinion. Lilly Wachowski has said that it is also a transgender movie, but she got me there, because I can’t see how that might be. Too subtly laid down for me? Still, if she says it, who, with her sister, is both the movie’s creator and co-director, who am I to doubt her?

          This is such a strange world; in fact, as J.B.S. Haldane once wrote of the universe: it is not just stranger than we imagine, but it is even stranger than we can imagine.

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      • #2306582
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Now I want to bring to your attention the work of the most remarkable director Brad Bird, who has made both very good animation and action movies, namely:

        The Iron Giant.

        The Incredibles.

        The Incredibles 2.

        Mission Impossible Ghost Protocol.

        Tomorrowland.

        The first three are all animation movies that I think that is fair to count as science fiction of the rather vague kind that is the most frequently encountered in movies. But they are all, in my view, true masterpieces, Brad Bird being one of the best creative movie makers around today.

        The fourth is the live action movie where Tom Cruise hangs around the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa in Dubay. Where to ‘hangs around’ one mentally should add ‘for dear life at 2,722 feet, or 845 m above the ground.’

        Roger Ebert had this review of the Iron Giant that strongly recommend people read:

        https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-iron-giant-1999

        Now about “Tomorrowland”:

        While the first four movies listed at the beginning were very successful, or at least have got and kept a substantially dedicated following throughout the years, another, more recent one of Bird’s movies and probably his most ambitious one until now, has not fared very well: it was very expensive to make and ended up costing Disney that produced it more than $120,000,000. It was also roundly panned by several critics from top publications.

        Quite frankly, I think that this is an excellent movie, truly worth watching. Also not all critics have deprecated it. According to Wikipedia:

        “David Edelstein of New York magazine gave the film a positive review, stating that “Tomorrowland is the most enchanting reactionary cultural diatribe ever made. It’s so smart, so winsome, so utterly rejuvenating that you’ll have to wait until your eyes have dried and your buzz has worn off before you can begin to argue with it.”

        Now “reactionary” is not my preferred adjective to use in front of any noun, but here has a rather positive meaning: it is a reaction against the dark side of advanced technology and its potential for making possible the establishment of some both stifling and permanent forms of autocracy and oligarchy.

        But it is even more about seeing some astounding special effects to illustrate time-traveling from the humdrum present to an extraordinarily exciting and cheering vision of the future … much like the  “Tomorrowland” in Disney parks. That turns out to be also an elaborate commercial for a certain kind of optimistic and sunny expectation of where things are going, except that it is actually shown in the future and one has to time-travel there to go and see it. And it is a vision that turns out to have little to do with the actual future, as it will be seen later on. But that is not all: there is a lot more to this movie, including (but  not limited to) good dialog and some good acting. Roger Ebert, again, gave this movie what I think it is fair to describe as “an admiring mixed review”:

        https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/tomorrowland-2015

        The film is a personal work of art that seems born of stubborn passion. It’s definitely not an assembly-line product, despite the way that some sequences evoke (deliberately, would seem) actual assembly lines. If it’s a bit irritating or dull at times, it’s because it seems clear that Bird knows why he’s showing us these things, and what he hoped to achieve by visualizing them in this manner, but he and his co-writers (including co-scenarist Jeff Jensen) can’t find a graceful way to communicate it.”

        No matter. The “message” of “Metropolis”—a parable of labor and capital which concludes that society needs the heart to mediate between the head and the hands—was a mess, too.

        But if you had to make a list of reasons why that film is still remembered, discussed, and raided for inspiration by films like Bird’s, “message” wouldn’t be on it. “Metropolis” is remembered because watching it is as close as many of us will get to being able to have another person’s dream.

        Hear, hear!

        It is available for streaming from Amazon. I have not been able to find it in any place I am familiar with that sells movie DVDs.

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      • #2306647
        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        I am not sure many will categorize this movie as SF, but I do and in my movie collection this movie is at the top with 10/10.

        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0756683/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

        Thanks for bumping “The Man From Earth”.

        I had heard of it, but never had the opportunity to watch it before.

        Just added it to my Amazon Prime watchlist. It’s included now for free streaming! 🙂

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      • #2306732
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        One of the latest SF TV shows is “Emergence”.  I really liked it but again it was cancelled after only one “season” in 2019.  Go to Google or you preferred search engine and you’ll see it under “Emergence TV Show – ABC”.  They are still showing the trailer and there’s a lot of info. about it too.  It was another show that had good ratings, good story, but still got cancelled.

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      • #2306738
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Anyone for Altered States ??

        marked the film debut of William Hurt and Drew Barrymore

        😵😇👿👪🙂

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altered_States

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2306750
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here is a list of shows and movies some people here might like and, or like to give their opinions on them (*):

        Movies:

        Inception

        Interstellar

        Minority Report

        Solaris  ( The 2002 Hollywood remake of the 1972 Tarkovsky’s classic based on the hallucinating novel by Stanislaw Lem (**))

        The Shape of Water

        TV Shows:

        Twilight Zone

        Outer Limits

        The Man in the High Castle (from Amazon, streaming)

        Mystery Science Theater 3000  (***)  (Both the 1990’s old TV show and the more recent Netflix pick up.)

        Now, which are your own favorites still not discussed here?

        (*) That I have put them in this list does not mean I like them, just that I believe they are both out there and are at least somewhat popular and worth discussing.

        (**) Lem, a Polish science fiction writer, author of the most compelling stories about alien worlds with completely alien, creepy and coherently incomprehensible life forms that I have ever read. They are ideal for being made into high-end TV, streaming and big screen science fiction movies; it is a shame that only “Solaris” has been made into a movie, as far as I know.)

        (***) Actually an ironic running commentary on bad movies, but taking place in a space station with robots, so…)

         

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        • #2306806
          AlexEiffel
          AskWoody_MVP

          I liked Interstellar and Minority report, but I would add them to the list of more popular movies with less artistic value.

          I found Inception overrated. Sort of a fancy James Bond. Maybe because I read critics that shouted genius. I didn’t find it very deep or anything, although technically competent. I prefer the trick movie Memento from Nolan and found him less interesting after. I wasn’t crazy about Dunkirk too. I guess I am just not much of a fan of Nolan.

          What about the serie The prisoner? Not sure, I watched a few episodes a long time ago.

          Melancholia? Who is the crazy one? The one that can’t live a normal life pretending it is not absurd that is more adapted to the second part of the movie or the normal ones that can’t face absurdity later and kill themselves or go crazy? Interesting, Although I find Lars Von Trier movies often a bit artificial or too closely inspired from masters, I still enjoy them. My favorite is Dogville, that I find truly original, deep and believable even with its particular setting. Oh, I just realized I described Stalker. In Antichrist, you clearly see Stalker just with the grass scenes, too. Lars, you will still need to find your own way. Maybe Breaking the wave is original or I just didn’t see the inspiration?

          • #2306895
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            AlexEiffel: I agree with you, particularly on “Inception.” My objections amount to this:

            (1) The movie maker took several years to make this movie and, in the interim, the computer imaging tricks kept getting better and better for making truly amazing special effects. So those special effects kept on getting piled up on this movie, until (in my opinion) it burst at the seams.

            (2) The philosophical existential ambiguity question of whether this is reality and one just woke up from a dream, or is it the other way around? A dream within a dream? Was much better posed by Zhuang Zhou, or Zwangzi, in the Chinese Taoist classic book of the same name some 2500 years ago. From Wikipedia:

            The well-known image of Zhuangzi wondering if he was a man who dreamed of being a butterfly or a butterfly dreaming of being a man is so striking that whole dramas have been written on its theme. In it Zhuangzi “[plays] with the theme of transformation”, illustrating that “the distinction between waking and dreaming is another false dichotomy. If [one] distinguishes them, how can [one] tell if [one] is now dreaming or awake?” 

            Zhuangzi-Butterfly-Dream

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      • #2306822
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Let me add one I am currently watching: Carnival Row.
        It is an Amazon thing, included in Prime (free month sub!! ) Season 1 showing 2 shot and likely in post. Steampunk, winged fae that fly, some lessons on prejudice, winged fae that fly whilst ….

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2306824
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        Thunderbirds – then we had Joe 90 were watched regularly as a kid, that I found (then) absolutely brilliant.
        so did my parents, as it was the only times I was quiet lol

        W10, the itch you simply cannot scratch!
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      • #2306878
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        The new (Netflix) Russian series ‘To The Lake \ Epidemiya’ (done in 2019 before Covid-19) is quite good.
        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9151230/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

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      • #2306914
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        On the subject of the philosophical problem of distinguishing dreams and reality raised by me and AlexEiffel when he commented on “Inception” that I had put in a list, the 2016 movie full of amazing CGI special effects (but also way too many for my taste) and I answered with my own comment, has reminded me of a great science fiction animated movie by the brilliant Satoshi Kon, too soon to die of pancreatic cancer (that seems to be around a lot these days.)

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paprika_(2006_film).

        And also of the last lines of the play “La Vida Es Sueño” (Life Is a Dream) by Pedro Calderón de La Barca, a poet and playwriter of the so-called Golden Century of the Spanish arts, during the Renaissance;

        “Que todo afán es pequeño” / Pues toda la vida es sueño/ Y los sueños sueños son.”

        (That all ambitious effort is worth little / because all of life is a dream / and dreams are just dreams.)

        Or these lines in Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”:

        You do look, my son, in a moved sort,
        As if you were dismay’d: be cheerful, sir.
        Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
        As I foretold you, were all spirits and
        Are melted into air, into thin air:
        And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
        The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
        The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
        Ye all which it inherit, shall dissolve
        And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
        Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
        As dreams are made on, and our little life
        Is rounded with a sleep.

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      • #2307002
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And now, one more Zhuangzi (the dreaming butterfly/man) inspired science fiction movie, here:

        The Lathe of Heaven, a 1980 film produced by National Public Radio in the USA based on a book from Ursula K. Leguin. According to this very interesting Wikipedia article:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lathe_of_Heaven

        The title is taken from the writings of Chuang Tzu (Zhuang Zhou) — specifically a passage from Book XXIII, paragraph 7, quoted as an epigraph to Chapter 3 of the novel.

        To let understanding stop at what cannot be understood is a high attainment. Those who cannot do it will be destroyed on the lathe of heaven.

        The movie (according to the corresponding Wikipedia article) had a fairly adventurous after life itself, and was finally recovered and remastered into DVD from a VCR tape found in someone’s house. Now it is available for streaming YouTube. Those who enjoy strange and philosophical science fiction will be well served by watching it:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8VRbaVNvSA

         

        One more thing about the surrealistic and philosophical animation science-fiction film “Paprika” mentioned in my previous comment. According to the Wikipedia article I gave a link to in that comment:

        Time magazine included it in its top 25 animated films of all time, while Time Out also included the film in its list of top 50 animated films of all time. Rotten Tomatoes included it in its list of fifty best animated films of all time. Newsweek Japan included Paprika in its list of the 100 best films of all time, while the American edition of Newsweek included it among its top twenty films of 2007. Metacritic has listed the film among the top 25 highest-rated science fiction films of all time, and the top 30 highest-rated animations of all time.

        Not bad.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBrUhQ0_qYA

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      • #2307018
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        “La Jetée” (meaning the jetty, or embarkation platform at the old Orli airport near Paris), is a short (28 minutes) avant garde science-fiction 1962 French film, directed by Chris Marker. Along with the expressionist silent-film era “Metropolis” (1927), directed by Fritz Lang, and already commented here #2188798 , it is considered to be one the most influential science fiction films ever made:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Jetée

        The story takes place in Paris after a nuclear war, where a group of scientists are trying to create a device to send people to the past and the future, hoping they might be able to bring back help for rebuilding their ruined world. They have trouble finding volunteers that do not go mad because of the shock of time travel on the nervous system. They find a man, a prisoner, that may foot the bill and send him to the past, years before the nuclear catastrophe, at a time when he was still a child and saw a disturbing thing at the airport he cannot remember what it was. His experience as time-traveller begins then and there, in the airport. The story is told mostly with a series of still shots.

        The complete movie (voice over narration in French) is available on YouTube; even those not able to follow the voice over are likely to get get a memorable impression of why this film is considered such a science fiction landmark:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fU99W-ZrIHQ

        This is a version with the vice over in Engish:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeTdW6IrwIw

        In 1995 a Hollywood movie called “Twelve Monkeys” with Bruce Willis in the role of the time-traveling prisoner, was based on “La Jetée” and was well-received by critics and public. Robert Ebert wrote a very positive review:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12_Monkeys

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      • #2307042
        APBiddle
        AskWoody Plus

        Colony.  Genuinely interesting characters, and a plot you needed to pay attention to.  Often something would happen or be said, and its significance would not become apparent until several episodes later.  It is hard to do a completely fresh invasion story, but they came very close.  Of course it was cancelled just as the Big Reveal was coming about which of the aliens were the Good Guys, if either.

      • #2307051
        anonymous
        Guest

        It will be due to my age (I’m 64 now) but when I was a pre-teen the German TV had a show called ‘Raumschiff Orion’. All in Black and white because color TV wasn’t available by then. You can find it on Youtube but they had splendid ideas. Filming it was a lot more difficult in the early sixties but they impressed me everytime back then.

        Later I was totally into the Starship Enterprise

        • #2307291
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Anonymous, thanks for bringing this to my attention!

          “Raumpatrouille Orion” (“Space Patrol Orion”) was a 1966 black and white TV show produced by ARD (a working group of public broadcasters of the Federal Republic of Germany) An exact contemporary of  the original series of Star Trek, it was made, it would seem, with substantially better funding and therefore less spartan ship interiors, the ship exterior resembling a big and sleek flying soccer and a crew with some futuristic beehive hairdos in evidence. And, in my opinion, some slight touches of  Fritz Lang’s “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” in some of the creepier sequences in some weird outer space installations. Also in this series, at least, in space everybody can hear you cry. Judging by how many “hits” one gets when googling it, this series has gained the status of  a”cult” TV show, somewhat like the “Dr Who” of the Baker years, with a faithful fans’ following over the decades.

          The videos of some of the episodes, roughly one hour long each, are available in YouTube. They are, of course, in German without English dubbing or subtitles. Here is the first episode, so those who don’t know German can get a feeling for what this series was like and those who know German can enjoy it:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftDXbIDfce8

          Prost!

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2307059
        anonymous
        Guest

        Mixing movies & TV, a big boost for “Star Trek-TOS”. It was the first SF space-based serious video effort since the movie “Forbidden Planet”, and brought serious SF to popularity for both TV and movies. The third season was inferior to the first two, however, and showed the fact that NBC gave the series little support that year, having renewed it only after a massive fan protest.

        As for Star Trek movies pre-J. J. Abrams, my favorite is one of the least mentioned- “Insurrection”. It breaks the mold of the “follow-the-herd of Starfleet” mode, to show members of the Establishment rebelling against their unjust policies, and highlights the plight of the small minorities, and points out the wide prevalence of greed as one of the primary motivators of human behavior. For the Abrams movies, however, although the third is similar to “Insurrection” in that it focuses more on character motivation than SF and CGI whiz-bang, it seems to me less interesting than his first two.

        For original concepts in SF video productions, it’s hard to beat “The Matrix” and “Inception”.

        “Dune”, of course, has two productions- the movie, and the 6-part TV series (far less known). The latter is much truer to Frank Herbert’s novel, but lacks the in-your-face punch of David Lynch’s typical approach that the movie has, making it my favorite of the two. It’s one of the dozen or so favorite movies I’ve watched a number of times.

        A special mention to “Ender’s Game”. An avid SF reader in my youth and early middle age, I essentially gave it up in my mid-to-lat 30’s. I saw a strong recommendation for the book in a blog completely unrelated to SF, and decided to give it a read on one of my travels. It had quite an unexpected denouement, but also such brilliant introspection given to the characters, enough to make me read almost all of Orson Scott Card’s other books in the Ender series. The movie was relatively true to the book, but, again, the book goes so much deeper. I’d recommend you read the book before seeing the movie, but that’s not really imperative.

        Just some personal musings. As to what’s the best- quien sabe?

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2307158
        RebusCom
        AskWoody Plus

        Babylon 5 was a very ambitious project constrained by a very low budget, but groundbreaking in many ways with it’s five year story arc outlined from the very beginning.  A favorite.

        However, as a youth I enjoyed a series not yet mentioned, a British sci-fi TV series (also broadcast in the US and Canada) called UFO.  It was shown in 1970 with 26 episodes.  It’s setting was a more contemporary 1980 about a threatening and mysterious alien race infiltrating and exploiting Earth and it’s residents and the secret organization SHADO established to counter the threat.  It included a moon base, space interceptors packing a single large nuclear missile, SkyDiver – a submarine with detachable interceptor aircraft, and many other “futuristic” vehicles and props with special effects quite advanced for 1969 when it was filmed, which covered underwater, land, air, space and moon.

        It did have some notable details that I was impressed with at the time such as no sound in space, unlike other shows with jet/rocket sounds of the spacecraft, etc.  The space scenes merely had subtle mood music that was not at all intrusive.

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2307190
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I was and am a fan of Babylon V (now available for free if one subscribes through Amazon Prime.) I have the DVDs of all five seasons. It was my first purchase of all the DVDs of a TV show, back in the late 1990’s.

          I think it was probably the most imaginative science-fiction TV series I’ve seen, except for the one-season and much lamented “Firefly” and for “Futurama”, also a casualty of an untimely termination.

          In fact, Babylon V also run against network opposition and was nearly cancelled, then got a one-year reprieve to wrap things up. The uncertainty caused Claudia Christian, as Lieutenant Commander Susan Ivanova, to quit at the end of the fourth season and go to seek her fortune elsewhere (she didn’t really succeed at that and was also deeply resented by the rest of the cast, Straczynski in particular, for leaving.)

          Straczynski tried to continue the project (and the jobs of some members of the cast) in the form of a series of TV movies, but only the first two were really much good, in my opinion. The whole thing continued in the usual form of graphic novels, some of which are considered to be “cannon” and some of which are not.

          Not all were actors with acting experience. A remarkable case of one who was not, was Jerry Doyle, as Michael Garibaldi, who in real life was first a stock broker and then a libertarian talk-radio political commentator.

          Two members of the regular cast died just a few years after the show ended: Biggs, as Dr. Franklin and Katsulas, as G’Kar.

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          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2307396
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Unfortunately, Babylon V is no longer available for free from Amazon: now it can be purchased for online streaming at the rate of one dollar per episode.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2307402
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Now I want to mention here some movies that belong to the more fanciful genre of “Steampunk” science fiction and one that appeals to my funny taste in weird movies that have a heart and a sense of humor:

        There is a list of them here:

        https://www.rebelsmarket.com/blog/posts/top-10-steampunk-movies-of-all-time-ranked-in-order

        But I have my doubts about some of the entries in the article: for example “The Golden Compass”, to my mind, is fantasy with a sprinkle of “quantum” and “parallel universes.” And “Hugo” is no science fiction movie: just a sort of period one that distorts the facts about the life of the great pioneer of moving pictures, Georges Meliès, in what I consider to be an absolutely shameful way. Otherwise, it’s not too bad.

        On the other hand , I believe that these totally qualify as science fiction, steampunk sub-genre:

        Wild Wild West

        The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

        20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

         

        “Wild Wild West” is a favorite of mine, by the way.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • #2307461
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” was one of the first SF movies to make a big impression on me as a youngster.  As long as we’re talking about Disney movies, I really liked the original “Absent Minded Professor” with Fred MacMurray mixing chemicals, and tweaking his calculations on the blackboard in his garage.

          This movie was both funny and inspiring to me.  Once he invented and got the Flubber under his control, the sky was not the limit.  I very much enjoyed watching him “fly” his Model T around.  These movies appealed to my early interest in science.

      • #2307491
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Another steampunk movie that I fully recommend seeing to those interested not just in steampunk but on good, wacky science fiction and alternative story:

        “Avril et le Monde Truqué”, the English version called “April and the Extraordinary World”, is an animated French-Belgian-Canadian co-production, made in 2015.

        The premise is that, if in France Napoleon III had died in an accident he himself brought about when trying to have scientists create an army of supermen to fight against the Prussians and have been succeeded by a pacifist son, so the Franco-Prussian War 0f 1870-71 never happened, but then, after a while, all prominent scientists were to start disappearing mysteriously, so the world wold never have been able to move from the age of steam, powered by coal and charcoal, to electricity and oil. And if the government then decided to jail all those remaining scientists that did not want to join secret projects to arm France with advanced super weapons in order to have a go at North America, as Europe had already run out of mineable coal (making the air hard to breath in) and had burned all its trees to use them as fuel, but there were still plenty of trees on the other side of the Atlantic, what then?

        The answer is that what happens is even less likely than the premise, but brilliantly thought out and shown in a great animated movie that has won a raft of prizes in Europe and America.

        The trailer of the English version:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utn3AuutXVk

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      • #2307579
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here, for your consideration, six box office blockbuster movies:

        The Abyss

        James Cameron  1989 movie that takes place on a submarine oil drilling installation where strange apparitions, a sunken soviet sub with live nukes on board, an unpleasant special ops. team and a catastrophic accident have everybody seriously spooked, including me, watching it.

        Avatar

        What can I say? A 2009 James Cameron movie.

        Independence Day

        A mixed of the sublime in special effects and, at times, story telling, with the really silly, particularly the ending, where dire planet-wide problems are resolved by hacking a super advanced alien computer with a completely unknown operating system system to plant a virus with a Mac ca. 1996. Best part, in my opinion: Will Smith kicking alien butt. Literally. Across the desert.

        Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

        A Steve Spielberg 1977 film:

        Aliens are weird but not bad and like really short melodies.

        ET  The Extra-Terrestrial.

        Another Steve Spielberg film made in 1982. I haven’t seen it.

        Pacific Rim

        Guillermo del Toro 2013 monster movie with giant robots, or rather anime-like “mecha” with people inside that battle at sea giant trans-dimensional marine monsters that are trying to conquer, or maybe destroy everybody and everything on land. Because who knows what trans-dimensional marine monsters may really have in mind? If they have minds, that is.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2307670
          RebusCom
          AskWoody Plus

          I interpreted “show” in the OP to mean television series, but if movies are included Avatar (3D) is certainly at or near the top.

          Sadly, the sequels are all being postponed yet another year to Dec. 2022 for Avatar2, even though it’s production is 100% complete and ready to be released.  Avatar3 isn’t until Dec. 2024 even though it’s now 95% complete. The delay is due to COVID with the studios not wanting profits to be impacted by theater restrictions.  They are milking it for maximum $$.

          If they were to release this year on schedule they’d have very little competition for the Academy Awards.  It’s a sparse year for movies.  That’s not where the money is though.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2307587
        WSAnklebuster
        AskWoody Plus

        Seriously? The best SF Series ever is Cleopatra 2525.

        {runs from the lounge, giggling}

        • #2307673
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          looking at the wikipedia article there maybe something interesting there.

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2307750
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          “Cleopatra 2525” Gina Torres is one of the actresses: enough said, I need to see it.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2307701
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        You’re all shameless time-wasters 😉 – and I’d never deign to be involved in such a frivolous discussion 😉

        I’d vote for Babylon 5. This from a sci-fi fan from way back, who remembers the days when people actually read, and grew up amid printed books. I’ve signed copies of books from Robert Silverberg (To Open the Sky), Larry Niven (Integral Trees), and David Brin (The Postman). I’m geeky enough to have visited a WorldCon, which had around 7K fans in attendance, and maybe five of them were women. Also a Los Angeles convention at which J. Michael Straczynski spoke on a panel. Before Babylon 5 he was a story editor for the TV series, “Murder, She Wrote”.

        During one of our private WorldCon parties I became impromptu director of a live internet video link with Santa Monica’s Internet Cafe, San Francisco’s Nikko hotel. Everclear with capiscum was served – among other libations. I began hollering over our din to our partiers for tattoos and body piercings from our audience.

        Our two judges in Santa Monica would hold up placards with numerical scores ranging between 1 and 10. Both judges were women. The day after that party, one of them drove to the Bay area to visit me 😉

        Once upon a time I’d met and worked a little with LeVar Barton on promotions of a concert event and he was a very nice man in person. About Babylon 5:  It had among the most fascinating and engaging character development and story lines I’ve ever seen in any sci-fi series. It also featured episodes with Walter Koenig as head of Babylon 5’s heinously subversive and chilling Psi Corps.

        I’d a feminine friend who grew up with Babylon 5 actor Stephen Furst, and  he was kind enough to invite my friend’s husband and me its active set. We talked with him (in costume), Bill Mumy, and Mira Furlan. I was smitten and almost reserved with Furlan 😉

        Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2307752
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Hey! That’s creds bragging enough for the rest of the year!

          And I am sick of envy, too. Babylon 5… Well, I wrote about it already, so no need to repeat myself. Too bad one cannot stream it for free from Amazon anymore. Or, that I know, without an ad every five minutes, or even that. But at least I have all five seasons’ DVDs.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2307724
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2307755
        sshank
        AskWoody Plus

        Not sticking with best, instead doing really good that you folks  aren’t mentioning:

        Comedy:

        Robocop – This is a hilarious satire which couldn’t find an audience.

        Braindead

        Better off Ted

        Middleman

        dead like me

        Anime

        cowboy bebop

        Ghost in a shell (whole series of series)

        Full metal Alchemist

        Noir

        General SciFi

        Orphan Black, at least the  first 3 seasons. Incredible. Might be best ever.

        Travelers

        Dark Angel

        Life  on  Mars

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2307762
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          sshank: Writing what follows based on my own recollections, I am of the impression that “Robocop”, the movie, did very well and was quite popular in its day. Moreover, going just by the box office performance, according to Wikipedia:

          RoboCop was released in American theaters on July 17, 1987. The film opened no. 1 at the US box office and grossed over $8 million in its opening weekend and another $6 million in its second weekend, again regaining the top spot at the box office. It topped rival films released at the same time, including “Full Metal Jacket” “Superman IV”. In total, it grossed $53.4 million during its North American run, making it the 16th most successful film that year. It also grossed an additional $24,036,000 from video rentals in the United States.

          I must confess that, while I am keen on the amazing work of the late Satoshi Kon (Paprika, Millennium Actress) and also of Katsushiro Otomo’s “Akira”, the movie, both in my own short list of science-fiction anime, that is about as far as my liking for science-fiction anime goes. On the other hand, when it comes to fantasy anime, I am in awe of the work that came out of Studio Ghibli and, more recently, started to come out of Studio Ponoc. Also of Makoto Shinkai’s “Children Who Chase Lost Voices.” But that is another story, for another place.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2308036
            sshank
            AskWoody Plus

            RoboCop was released in American theaters on July 17, 1987

            The reason the tv show did nothing, was that it was a political and social satire that didn’t particularly appeal to some of the viewers expecting a violent action series. While those who would  appreciate it didn’t watch because they thought it was a violent action flick.

            The TV show always showed at least once, the characters watching a tv advertisement which was just like our dumbest worst ads, but a little more so. Just enough beyond what we had then to make you wonder if they really were advertising that drug or was it part of the show. Also, thinking back to the clinton presidency, when they left an overcrowded health clinic, with dying people in the hallways unable to get treatment, the sign at the door said, “Hillary Clinton Health Clinic” if you were paying enough attention to catch it.

            The Robocop in the tv show, never hurt humans. When fired upon by “bad guys”, he would shoot into a corner, which would ricochet to a chain holding an overhead light which would fall down knocking the gun from his hand. Then Robo would gently cuff him and take him in.

             

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2307953
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          Thank you sshank for being the second person to mention “Dark Angel”, myself being the first in another thread.  This was IMO a great TV show set in the near future, and was based on the dangers of genetically engineering humans to be super soldiers.  I liked it so much that I bought the DVD’s for each of all two seasons.  Jessica Alba and Michael Weatherly were the two main characters.

          • #2308245
            wavy
            AskWoody Plus

            charlie thanks for this one I think I missed the second season, probably a consequence of working a night shift 🙁

            🍻

            Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2307757
        Vincenzo
        AskWoody Lounger

        12 Monkeys the movie has been mentioned, but I didn’t see 12 Monkeys tv series.
        I enjoyed it, even though I could never follow the overall plot.

        Also Caprica was good.

        And the Blade Runner sequel.

        • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by Vincenzo.
        • #2307932
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          Also Caprica was good.

          Yes but ended early IIRC.

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2307983
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Vincenzo: To understand “12 Monkeys” you could first have a look at “La Jetée” (here #2307018  ).

          It is the original movie on which the one with Bruce Willis was based.

          So, was “12 Monkeys” a ripoff of a famous movie? Yes Sir! Just as “The Magnificent Seven” was a ripoff of “The Seven Samurai” and the  first Star Wars  movie,”Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope” was a ripoff of another Kurosawa movie: “The Hidden Fortress”:

          https://film.avclub.com/an-influence-on-star-wars-the-hidden-fortress-is-kuros-1798179895

          As I think it was Roger Ebert who once observed: “If you are going to ripoff from someone, you better ripoff from the best.”

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          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2308047
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Joss Whedon “Dollhouse” was (no big surprise) a  2009 one season TV show that, as excerpted from its Wikipedia article:

        ” … revolves around a corporation running numerous underground establishments (known as “Dollhouses”) around the globe that program individuals referred to as Actives (or Dolls) with temporary personalities and skills. Wealthy clients hire Actives from Dollhouses at great expense for various purposes, including heists, sexual encounters, assassinations, expert counsel, and all manner of unique experiences.”

        It was a combination of science fiction action thriller and horror story, much as its Whedon’s predecessors “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Angel” were of fantasy, and “Firefly” was of science fiction, but without the light touches of comedy and snappy dialog those others were sprinkled with. The Dolls didn’t say that much. If one likes scary science fiction shows, this is one to see.

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      • #2308056
        Geo
        AskWoody Plus

        Lets get in Mr. Peabody and Sherman’s way back machine from the “Rocky and Bullwinkle show,”  and return to the beginning of TV.   “Space Patrol”  1950.

        • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by Geo.
        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2308061
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I’d be a bit more modest and go back just to the time, 1979 – 81, of “Buck Rogers in the 25th Century.”

          Beep!, beep!

           

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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      • #2308112
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Has anyone mentioned Westworld ?

        ps. Second season of the The Mandalorian will air today.

        • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by Alex5723.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2308128
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex: Your two links are to IMDb Web pages; as it happens, that is not a very good place to find out about a streaming show. It takes a lot of digging around to find a very important and useful fact: where one can stream it from? In fact I had to spend close to half an hour to discover that Westworld is an HBO show and The Mandalorian is on Disney +, neither of which I subscribe to.

          Wikipedia is a lot more informative and has articles on both shows, including such details as the prizes they have won. Showing that the Mandalorian, for example has been doing OK in this respect for cinematography and special effects.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2308134
            Kirsty
            Manager

            Alex: Your two links are to IMDb Web pages; as it happens, that is not a very good place to find out about a streaming show. It takes a lot of digging around to find a very important and useful fact: where one can stream it from? In fact I had to spend close to half an hour to discover that Westworld is an HBO show and The Mandalorian is on Disney +, neither of which I subscribe to.

            It was good of @Alex5723 to share shows he was interested in. It really isn’t essential to provides links to streaming options which any one Lounger may or may not be subscribed to. For one thing, many of us may not be in the same location you are…
            😉

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2308135
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I don’t care about Wikipedia in regard to Movies, Tv..or prizes …
        I care about viewers reviews on IMDB, Rotten Tomatoes..

        🙂

        • #2308260
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          One posts comments here to inform others. So please, try to give links to more informative sites that IMDb:  IMDb reviews are usually very short, some without explaining what the show is about but concentrating in some details of it without providing the necessary background to those not familiar with the show, and sometimes there are no reviews at all, because they are posted by subscribers on a voluntary basis. Issues such as the one I had mentioned, trying to figure out from where to stream those shows Alex listed in his comment, are important.

          Rotten tomatoes usually has informed reviews, both from professional critics and from selected members of the audience, but it has become harder to access: now it requires turning off the adblocker before one can look at the reviews. This is an unfortunate and recent development.

          As to Wikipedia: most recent movies and shows reviewed there are, at least initially, before getting edited, written by the makers of those shows or movies. So one always gets a summary of the plot enough to get an idea of what the work is about. I wouldn’t emphasize the reliability of the information any stronger than that… unless is about older acknowledged classics, more likely to have been edited by the usual Wiki process.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2308289
            Kirsty
            Manager

            trying to figure out from where to stream those shows … are important.

            It appears we don’t agree. Some old shows are not available by streaming.

            It is not essential for something to be streamed for it to be someone’s opinion…

          • #2308344
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Another informative source about TV shows, streaming shows and movies is Metacritic. I had not paid much attention to it until now.So I decided to have a closer look.

            For example, here is its assessment of the “Mandalorian” and include, same as Rotten Tomatoes, a number of reviews from critics (76 in this example) of a number of well-known publications and of others less so:

            https://www.metacritic.com/tv/the-mandalorian/season-2?ref=hp

            But, unlike Rotten Tomatoes (RT), it does not carry advertisement, or forces people to watch them by making it turn off their adblockers; also it can be browsed with most browsers, unlike RT that recently has become one of those very picky sites that only allow the use of a selected few.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2308156
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Ghost in the Shell movies and TV series.

        Ghost In The Shell S.A.C The Laughing Man 2003
        Ghost In The Shell S.A.C Individual Eleven 2005
        Ghost in the Shell 2.0 2008
        Ghost in the Shell Arise Border 1 Ghost Pain 2013
        Ghost In The Shell Arise Border 2 Ghost Whisper 2013
        Ghost In The Shell Arise Border 3 Ghost Tears 2014
        Ghost in the Shell Arise Border 4 Ghost Stands Alone 2014
        Ghost in the Shell Arise Border 5 Pyrophoric Cult 2015
        Ghost in the Shell The New Movie 2015
        Ghost in the Shell 2017

        Ghost In the Shell SAC_2045 2020 (tv)

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      • #2308220
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        I’d be a bit more modest and go back just to the time, 1979 – 81, of “Buck Rogers in the 25th Century.”

        Beep!, beep!

        ‘BeeGee BeeGee’ is more like it 😛
        ‘Beep Beep’ was roadrunner (cartoon)

        W10, the itch you simply cannot scratch!
        • #2308270
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Hey, Microfix, you are describing the cute little robot, same one I am referring to? You might well be quite right about that, but my memory of the sounds it made are as I wrote, except it was two longer tones, not the two brief “bips” of the road-runner. Well, what do you know? Memory: what a mystery! Still, I stand for my recommendation to those interested in checking out old shows to look into this particular one. This is a trailer of the series:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAadQv-AL0Q

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          • #2308312
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            Hey, Microfix, you are describing the cute little robot, same one I am referring to?

            No, I’m describing ‘Twiki’ 🙂

            W10, the itch you simply cannot scratch!
      • #2308269
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        Historically and even gnow I’m a movies guy. Simple stories, well told. Get in. Do the story. Get out. Yes, I enjoy a good small-screen series but my tastes are like neckties – they suit me grandly or they don’t without much in between. The discussion here has sparked many fabulous memories of fabulous, feature-length sci-fi/sci-fantasy moofies. A partial memory dump:

        Mr. Rice’s Secret

        Death Becomes Her

        District 9

        The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension

        Tank Girl

        Johnny Mnemonic

        The Fifth Element

        Soylent Green

        Idiocracy

        The Island of Dr. Moreau

        Gandahar

        I, Robot

        And anything and everything the Wachowski sibs do, including Sense8 and Cloud Atlas. Yes, the Matrix series is also very good yet it also gets plenty of traction on its own.

        Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
        • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by Michael Austin.
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        • #2308277
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Michael Austin: There are a few entries in your list I have not come across or had a chance to see before, but those I recognize are also favorites of mine. For example “Cloud Atlas” and “The Fifth Element.” I strongly recommend those two to anyone who has not seen them.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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        • #2308282
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          I am still hoping buckeroo bonzai come to netflix!! It is on my list!
          Oh and the fifth element is one of my favorites. The floating noodle shop !!!

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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        • #2308313
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          I Robot was a movie I enjoyed a lot.  Will Smith was good and the new story was done well and kept the robotic laws of the original book by Isaac Asimov.

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      • #2308339
        anonymous
        Guest

        I particularly enjoyed ‘Childhood’s End’ by  A.C. Clarke.  I read the book overnight – could not put it down.  At first I did not understand why Clarke chose such a shocking form for the alien overlords.   Later my mind clicked in to the significance of it.  Very disturbing!

         

      • #2308362
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Not paranoid enough already? Then you need to watch “Cube”:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2GHCMiiAJg

        This is a science fiction&Horror Canadian movie. If, by the end, it still does not make sense to you, that is precisely the idea:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cube_(film)

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      • #2308501
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Dr. No (1962)
        From Russia with Love (1963)
        Goldfinger (1964)
        Thunderball (1965)
        You Only Live Twice (1967)
        Diamonds Are Forever (1971)
        Never Say Never Again (1983)

        And so much more.

        Vale, Sean Connery

        https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-54761824

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      • #2308558
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Now it is Halloween and I have the consequent urgent need to find some appropriately hair-rising sci-fi horror B movie to recommend here. So I remembered one called “Pitch Black” that came out in 2000. (Now available from Amazon Prime.)

        “Pitch Black”, that I saw on TV, a long-ago dark and rainy night, alone, in a largely empty apartment building, was really …. scary (add mentally a Woody’s unsuitable expletive or two in front of “scary”, please.)

        It cost a very frugal 25 millions, had a small principal cast. In the story, most of those in a passenger-carrying space ship, including a very dangerous criminal being transported under some serious restraints that break when the ship hits some space rocks and crashes on a deserted planet (‘deserted’, well…), most of them, die during this crash. So the criminal is now out and about on this planet, where some insanely nasty alien lifeforms come out of underground caves during the darkest part of long-lasting if rare triple-sun eclipses. One of which is now, as it happens, imminent, to kill and eat whatever happens to be edible around there. Shipwrecked people, for example. So the spaceship  crashes at the start of the movie, most of the crew and passengers on board die even before the main story begins and more keep dying through it, all the way to the end, so there are only a few actors in main roles to be paid decent wages.

        Although several critics scoffed noisily at it, it has become a cult movie. So, there. People remember the movie and keep watching it, but who remembers those smirking critics, huh? And, over the years, there have been one or two follow-on movies, to prove the above statements are entirely true.

        Here is a clip to get a taste of the movie:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luuYRrPaEpM

        Here is more on this movie:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitch_Black_(film)

        One might try to make sense of “Pitch Black”, but making sense was never its real point. Its real point was to scare people ….less. Well, it did to me, back in 2000. Probably it still would.

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        • #2308594
          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          Pitch Black is the first of Reddick series :

          Pitch Black (2000)
          The Chronicles of Riddick (2004)
          Riddick (2013)

          I would add to the list the Resident Evil series :

          Resident Evil (2002)
          Resident Evil: Apocalypse (2004)
          Resident Evil: Extinction (2007)
          Resident Evil: Afterlife (2010)
          Resident Evil: Retribution (2012)
          Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2016)

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        • #2308625
          Michael Austin
          AskWoody Plus

          Pitch Black is/was/will be a very good movie.

          Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
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      • #2308595
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Solaris (1972) Solyaris (original title)

        * The remake with George Clooney from 2002 is bad.

        There are also Solaris (1968) TV movie and a Japanese remake from 2007.

        • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
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        • #2308601
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Solaris, the novel, that I read sometime back in the eighties, truly bowled me over, as did the Tarkovsky movie with the unforgettable scene of an intimate little party for two, with those floating candle sticks. I also saw the 2002 version with George Clooney in the leading role, directed by Steve Soderbergh and produced by James Cameron (of “Avatar” fame) and was well impressed. It seemed closer to the original novel. But Stanislaw Lem, the Polish author of the novel and one of the true geniuses of science fiction, did not like either movie because they were mostly about the relationship of the two main characters: that between the main protagonist and his wife and, later, between him and her ghostly simulacrum created by the incomprehensible living ocean of the planet Solaris that their space station was orbiting. While Lem’s book was mostly about the ocean and its disturbing effect on the members of the space station:

          …to my best knowledge, the book was not dedicated to erotic problems of people in outer space… As Solaris’ author I shall allow myself to repeat that I only wanted to create a vision of a human encounter with something that certainly exists, in a mighty manner perhaps, but cannot be reduced to human concepts, ideas or images. This is why the book was entitled “Solaris” and not “Love in Outer Space”.
          — Stanislaw Lem, The Solaris Station (December 8, 2002)

          Roger Ebert liked both movies and gave the 2002 version three and a half stars out of four, meaning: a very good movie, just not quite a great one. He wrote:

          When I saw Tarkovsky’s original film, I felt absorbed in it, as if it were a sponge. It was slow, mysterious, confusing, and I have never forgotten it. Soderbergh’s version is more clean and spare, more easily readable, but it pays full attention to the ideas and doesn’t compromise. Tarkovsky was a genius, but one who demanded great patience from his audience as he ponderously marched toward his goals. The Soderbergh version is like the same story freed from the weight of Tarkovsky’s solemnity. And it evokes one of the rarest of movie emotions, ironic regret

          These excerpts are taken from:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solaris_(2002_film)

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      • #2308632
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        When youse guys mention these screened entertainments I take your mention of them sincerely and use my own judgement for my own tastes. You’ve mentioned shows I haven’t heard about and I thank you! I very much dislike poorly-made screened entertainment of any sort, and until the last few years didn’t like most sci-fi or sci-fantasy series.

        And, since we we’re willingly and gratefully meandering to and fro about ‘shows’ and ‘movies’ two other movies just came to mind:

        I’d suggest the movie, The Men Who Stare at Goats, as a candidate in the sci-fantasy category. Not only did I find it to be a fabulously-entertaining, very funny and at turns cloak-and-dagger bit of film making with spectacular acting, but I know a fair bit about the real-life adventures which preceded its making. George Clooney’s portrayal of “sparkly eyes” for Ewan McGregor made me guffaw and still makes me smile. The characters in the movie are aggregations of several real-life people, a couple of whom I know.

        For aficionados of things which also play as other-worldly, Russell Targ’s and Lance Mungia’s documentary, Third Eye Spies, plays well for someone who hasn’t heard much about the now-shuttered Stargate espionage projects. I know Russell well, and I’d gotten to know Lance. I’m acquainted with three or so people in that seemingly fictional documentary.

        And another one you don’t often see on movie lists is the genre-transcendent Suspect Zero with Ben Kingsley, Aaron Eckhart, and Carrie-Ann Moss. Suspect Zero is a ‘Who-Done-It’ chiller about Ben Kingsley’s gifted but twisted character, being chased by Eckhart’s and Moss’s characters. And which lover of tough and tender femininity doesn’t love watching Carrie-Ann Moss (like in the Matrix series)? Russell was a technical advisor for Suspect Zero.

        Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
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        • #2308723
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          “Men Who Stare At Goats”: More than in the science-fiction category, it belongs in the the “off-the-wall real-life stories that look and feel like off-the-wall science fiction” category.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Men_Who_Stare_at_Goats

          “Just covering all the bases, because one never knows …”

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      • #2308647
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        2081 (2009)

        After Vonnegut’s original story

        “In 2081, American society is a dystopia, in which all individual inequality has been erased by the fictional 211th, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution and the “unceasing vigilance of the United States Handicapper General”, after that cabinet office was created to ensure a “golden age of equality” in the United States. Exceptionalness in the world is destroyed in the name of equality, achieved through the use of “handicaps”—physical devices used to nullify every inborn advantage any person might have over another: “The strong wear weights, the beautiful wear masks, and the intelligent wear earpieces that fire off loud noises to keep them from taking unfair advantage of their brains.”[1]”

        Mad Max series :

        Mad Max (1979)
        The Road Warrior (1981)
        Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (1985)
        Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)

        Night Watch (2004) / Day Watch (2006)

        Stalker (1979) (Tarkovsky. A Masterpiece)

        “The film tells the story of an expedition led by a figure known as the “Stalker” (Alexander Kaidanovsky), who takes his two clients—a melancholic writer (Anatoly Solonitsyn) seeking inspiration, and a professor (Nikolai Grinko) seeking scientific discovery—to a mysterious restricted site known simply as the “Zone”, where there supposedly exists a room which grants a person’s innermost desires.”

        • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
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        • #2308681
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex, Thanks for bringing people’s attentions to those great movies. (I have the DVDs of all the Mad Max movies.)

          I am delighted to learn that one of the very addictive Kurt Vonnegut’s great stories has been made into a what, by the looks of it, is a very good movie. His novel “Slaughterhouse Five”, was made (in 1972) into another movie that was very well received and had an amazing sound track: renditions of some of J.S. Bach keyboard instrument works by none other than Glen Gould, as well as a the last movement of JSB’s Brandenburg concerto No. 4 at the height of its most dramatic part, the one about the firebombing of Dresden during WWII (a movement that if I had my way, would be played at my funeral, as to me at least, it sounds like the summation of someone’s life). But how about “The Sirens of Titan” (“Titan”, as in the biggest moon in the Solar System) and also “Cat’s Cradle” (the one with the science fiction-ish “ice 9” macguffin and also the preserver for eternity of the final act of cosmic defiance of the point-of-view protagonist: good and ambitious film makers, please, take a hint.)

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slaughterhouse-Five_(film)

          And so it goes.

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        • #2309104
          Michael Austin
          AskWoody Plus

          I’d not heard about 2081 and now wanna look it up, thanks.

          Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
      • #2308690
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        OscarCP, I have ‘Slaughterhouse Five’ in my movie library (and all the others in my posts).
        ‘The Sirens of Titan’ and ‘Cat’s Cradle’ didn’t make it to the cinema. 🙁

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        • #2308727
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex, you wrote:”‘The Sirens of Titan’ and ‘Cat’s Cradle’ didn’t make it to the cinema.” Too sadly true. Hence my call for “good and ambitious movie makers [to] take a hint” … because why not?

          By the way: Kurt Vonnegut’s praises for Céline’s “Journey to the End of the Night” — about the attempt to escape by train from the advancing allied troops by a group of collaborationist members of  the Petain’s Vichy regime, still barely controlling the occupied part of France, towards the end of WWII — resulted in my reading this very dark and semi-autobiographic masterwork, for which I am forever thankful to KV: it reads almost like a dystopian science fiction story. (There is a movie either Brazilian, or with a Brazilian setting, by the same name, but it has nothing to do with the Céline novel, or with science fiction.)

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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          • #2308768
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            I just found out, visiting Roger Ebert’s site, that Kurt Vonnegut’s novel “Mother Night” was made into a movie in 1996. But it is not a science fiction story:

            https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/mother-night-1996

            Ebert’s review is tentative, somewhat ambiguous… about a movie that is all about the ambiguities of human life presented at their most extreme in this movie, because they are so presented in the novel.

            And so it goes.

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            • #2309103
              Michael Austin
              AskWoody Plus

              Mother Night:  I remember seeing it and liking it. Yes, zero sci-fi content.

              Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2308857
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Why isnt enybody mentioning TENET? I was in cinema three times to see this movie (when the world was still normal, *SIGH*). Its awesome!

        I love movies, where you have to watch multiple times to understand all of it. Like Cloud Atlas, The Illusionist, Detour (2016), …

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

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        • #2309038
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Doriel, TENET is still being shown on actual movie theaters, at least here, in the USA. As most of us are not going out to see movies because of COVID-19, this movie has not had any effect here on many of us, yet. If you have more information, having seen it already and being enthusiastic about it, maybe you could add a comment, perhaps with some links to trailers and, or informative clips and review articles on the Web?

          I encourage to do that to anyone who brings our attention to some movie or show not mentioned here already. One can check if it has been mentioned or not by using the Ctrl+F or equivalent shortcut and entering in the search field some appropriate word(s).

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2309189
            doriel
            AskWoody Lounger

            I would definatelly recommend TENET movie. Its true, that its only in theatres now. And in Europe theatres are closed in most of the countries, so.. Its maybe impossible to watch it right now, but it is definatelly worth waiting.
            Its revolutionary for me as Matrix was, I was stunned by its music and story also. Simply love that movie already.
            IMdB trailer HERE

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        • #2309187
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Tenet is brilliant, really clever concept well executed.

          cheers, Paul

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2315717
          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          Very disappointed with ‘Tenet’ movie. I was hoping for more from Christopher Nolan, something at the level of ‘Inception’, ‘The Dark Knight’…
          The ‘Tenet’ movie is just boring…

      • #2309157
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        One word: “Contact”

        Two more words: “Jody Foster”

        Another two words: “Carl Sagan”

        Well, if there is a science-fiction movie with 95 – 99% actual hard science and a tiny bit of stretching the known facts to just before where they snap, this movie is “Contact” (1997), based on Carl Sagan’s (an actual scientist) eponymous novel.

        I am not going to describe it beyond saying that, if there is a technologically advanced enough alien civilization out there, somewhere in the Milky Way, that actually uses radio to communicate or try to communicate with other civilizations advanced enough to have a bunch of telescopes arranged in “Y” formation in the middle of the New Mexico semi-desert, near Socorro, population 8407 when they are all in town, then this is the story of Judy Foster finding out about them aliens by listening with her AirPods to what is coming through the telescopes and, eventually, having a huge machine built to alien specifications and using it to go visit the aliens, then coming back and nobody believes Jody, but …

        Well, I better let the late Roger Ebert tell you all about it and why you really should watch this movie, if you have not already. Or watch it again, anyway, because it is that good (it can be streamed from Amazon, for a price). It has to be, for Ebert to give the highest of his accolades, pronouncing it “a great movie” and in the company of things like “The Seven Samurai” and “Citizen Kane” and giving it four stars out of four.

        https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-contact-1997

        One disappointing thing about this otherwise fantastically good movie, is that it is missing that thing at the end of the novel, about an encrypted message consisting of a sequence of numbers spread among the infinite digits of the number pi. Now pi is a fundamental constant that can be said, with a high degree of confidence, that it has been discovered, not invented, because it is a property of reality itself. So, how could that message be there? WHO put it there? Well … could it be G..?

         

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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        • #2309177
          Michael Austin
          AskWoody Plus

          Yes, sir, Oscar! Contact is a fabulous flick in so many ways! The movie’s story and all its performances are exceptional 😉

          At a Planetary Society meeting in a Los Angeles theater, conducting a live broadcast of a NASA mission (for Cassini–Huygens?) a friend and I watched as Sagan talked from the stage. He wistfully mentioned SETI, and how his team had found a 7-second, non-random signal they couldn’t find again. Long ago my work computers at our animation gallery gleefully crunched data units for SETI@Home.

          Might you have heard about To the Stars Academy? I don’t follow their stuff but I do find it interesting, and a couple of years ago I got acquainted with co-founder Hal Puthoff through a mutual friend.

          It was also in 2018 that I met Jacques Vallée, upon whose work the wonderful sci-fi movie, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, is said to have been based. Vallée is one of the most intelligent, present-in-the-moment people I’ve ever talked with. I asked him what his research plans were for the next several years, and he said the study of extra-terrestrial metals and materials were at the top of his list.

          Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
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      • #2309327
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        “The Man from Earth is a 2007 American drama sicence fiction film written by Jerome Bixbi and directed by Richard Schenkman

        Nice one Oscar! I just watched on Prime last night! There is a sequel :The Man from Earth: Holocene
        Doubt it will be as good as the original but worth a try!

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2309344
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        November the third, AD 2020: while we are all waiting for what we are all waiting for, here is all I am going to tell you:

        Men in Black.

        Now, please watch at this thing in my hand. It will be just a brief shiny light.

        Thank you. We are done here.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Men_in_Black_(film_series)

        Disclaimer: I’ve only seen the first two of this series. If you have seen them already, please, feel free to inform me with your opinions on the other two as well.

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        • #2309417
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          MIB 4th episode is amazing, saw it recently. You dont even need to se the prequels. Its funny, its interesting and I had wonderful time watching that movie.

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      • #2309701
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Far from being even close to ‘the best’ but way before COVID-19.
        Mimic movie series.

        “In Manhattan, cockroaches are spreading the deadly “Strickler’s disease” that is claiming hundreds of the city’s children. Dr. Peter Mann, Deputy Director of the CDC, recruits entomologist Dr. Susan Tyler, who uses genetic engineering to create what she calls the Judas breed, a hybrid between a mantis and a termite that releases an enzyme which accelerates the roaches’ metabolism, thus causing them to starve to death faster than they can nourish themselves. The disease is successfully eradicated….”

        Mimic (1997)
        Mimic 2 (2001)
        Mimic: Sentinel (2003)

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      • #2311612
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        One of the best movies sci-fi/none sci-fi :
        Donnie Darko

        On October 2, 1988, in the small town of Middlesex, Virginia, troubled teenager Donald J. “Donnie” Darko, led by a mysterious voice, sleepwalks out of his home. Once outside, he meets a figure in a monstrous rabbit costume who introduces himself as Frank and tells Donnie that the world will end in 28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes and 12 seconds. Donnie wakes up the next morning on a local golf course and returns home to discover a jet engine has crashed into his bedroom. His older sister Elizabeth tells him the FAA investigators do not know its origin….

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        • #2311669
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2311673
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            I tend to agree with Alex: From the plot summary in the Wikipedia article, this looks to me as a time-bending ghost story, not a science fiction one, as there is no “science” in it.

            I have not seen this movie, but genre aside, it seems to have a really interesting idea behind, and I am sucker for time-bending ghost stories. So: thanks Alex and Wavy for bringing it to my attention.

            On the topic of time-bending ghost stories: if you have HBO, have a look at “When Marnie was there”, the very last animation movie to come out of the illustrious Studio Ghibli before it finally closed up shop a couple of years ago. It is about two young women from different epochs that, somehow, meet, become friends, and where each is a ghost to the other.

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      • #2311699
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        this looks to me as a time-bending ghost story, not a science fiction one

        Donnie Darko is cataloged as “science fiction psychological thriller ” in Wiki and IMDB…
        and has no elements of a ghost story.

        If you are looking for some witchcraft, ghosts, demons, unearthly creatures, time travel… look no further then the excellent ‘Lovecraft Country‘ series (on HBO).

        Another very good sci-fi time travel series ‘The Umbrella Academy‘ (Netflix).

        “The Umbrella Academy is set in a universe where 43 women around the world give birth simultaneously on October 1, 1989, despite none of them showing any sign of pregnancy until labor began. Seven of the children are adopted by eccentric billionaire Sir Reginald Hargreeves and turned into a superhero team that he calls “The Umbrella Academy.” Hargreeves gives the children numbers rather than names, but they eventually are named by their robot-mother, Grace, as Luther, Diego, Allison, Klaus, Five, Ben, and Vanya.[2] While putting six of his children to work fighting crime, Reginald keeps Vanya apart from her siblings’ activities, as she supposedly demonstrates no powers of her own.”

        • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Alex5723.
        • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Alex5723.
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        • #2311720
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          The “ghost story with time bending” elements are, at the very least, present at the end of the movie, according to my one source of information already mentioned. Going by that single, but usually reliable source, and regardless of who is saying what elsewhere, I am pretty sure that a mysterious story with time bending without some rubber-science mechanism explicitly mentioned to explain it, is not science fiction, but fantasy.

          I am expressing in this way my firm opinion that too many things are classified as science fiction that are most definitely not that. Stories so misclassified are not necessarily bad and some I know of by having read or watched them are quite good. “When Marney Was There” being one excellent example of this. Some stories are a mix of science fiction and fantasy. For example, some novels by the late Terry Pratchett could be an example of this, if one accepts that a flat. disk-shaped world where magic is a thing, suspended on the backs of elephants standing on the shell of a giant turtle that stands on the shell of another giant turtle so, recursively, it is giant turtles all the way down, is science fictional enough, it being scientific in a Middle Ages sort of of way.

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          • #2311821
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            There is only one turtle, flying through space – as turtles do.

            cheers, Paul

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      • #2311815
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        On the subject of “is this science fiction or is it fantasy?” you might want to have a look at this before going any further:

        https://www.hbomax.com/series/urn:hbo:series:GXYUhuQ6aq6nCVgEAAAlR/?utm_id=sa%7c71700000066889514%7c58700005930499206%7cp54264334887&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6LDjkKOB7QIV58uGCh1rtwnjEAAYASAAEgLHb_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

        Some say it is science fiction, because of the “parallel universes” and some mention of fundamental particles unknown to science so far, constituting the so-called “Dust” and with a fundamental role in the workings of the Universe somehow or other explained by quantum mechanics. I, on the other hand, would argue that it is fantasy with a sprinkle of quantum physics dust. (Pun intended.)

        Be as it may, Lyra Silvertongue, nee Bellacqua,  and friends are all in this show. And her cute demon Pantalaimon is in it, too.

        But to see this, you need to be on HBO or BBC, depending on which side of the Pond you happen to be. If not, in the USA, you can take the “Free trial” of HBO and see what you see. In the UK you better pay the BBC tax.

        The general commentary, so far, has been favorable. At least the consensus seems to be that is better than the movie.

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        • #2311818
          Kirsty
          Manager

          Not a helpful link, unless you’re in US, sorry 😥

          HBO Max is currently only supported in the U.S. and certain U.S. territories.

          • #2311819
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Kirsty, As I have mentioned in my previous comment, it can be watched in HBO for those in the USA, in the BBC for those in the UK.

            For further clarification, it’s co-produced by the BBC and HBO and distributed in the US by HBO. The link I have given is helpful to those in the USA. Those in the UK all they have to do is turn on the TV. As long as they are current with their BBC tax (a.k.a “TV license”), as I have also already mentioned. Moreover, it is also shown in Australia and in New Zealand, maybe in other countries as well.

            One more thing: there is going to be one season for each book in the trilogy. The first season, along the lines of “The Golden Compass” started late last year and now the premiere of the second season, based on “The Subtle Knife”, is scheduled to start in the UK on November 8th and in the USA on November 16th. For all the details I am omitting, including a summary of the episodes:

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/His_Dark_Materials_(TV_series)

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            • #2311940
              wavy
              AskWoody Plus

              Now I wonder just when season 2 will be on netflix or prime.

              🍻

              Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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              • #2312115
                OscarCP
                AskWoody Plus

                Wavy: “Now I wonder just when season 2 will be on netflix or prime

                Unlikely, as HBO co-owns this show with the BBC. The best thing to hope for is that they’ll eventually release the seasons in DVD so one can buy them. Alternatively, in the USA, one could subscribe to HBO.

                For my part, I already subscribe to Netflix and Amazon Prime, and stream video rather sparingly, as I am not usually free to watch movies and shows more than three or four hours a day max, so adding HBO is not going to do that much for me. So I just hope they release this show as DVD.

                The next season, sometime next year, is going to be the last one, following the other two along the lines of “The Amber Spyglass”, the last book in the trilogy.

                By the way, Pullman has been writing another trilogy called “The Book of Dust” that is a sequel to this first one, with two books already out and one more (I understand) still to be written. The two books now on sale are “La Belle Sauvage” (*) and “The Secret Commonwealth.” Having read them, I recommend them to those who enjoyed reading the first trilogy.

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Dust

                (*) Actually the first novel is a prequel to the first trilogy, with Lyra as a baby, while the second novel is a follow on to the first trilogy, with Lyra all grown-up and having demon issues. So “The Book of Dust”, at this point, is more of a sandwichlogy than a trilogy in the making.

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              • #2312291
                wavy
                AskWoody Plus

                Season one is on Netflix dvd , which is where I saw it. So maybe ….

                🍻

                Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2312127
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        News Flash: “His Dark Materials” season 1 is out on DVD as well as streaming from Amazon, for a price. Both options cost around US$10.

        Season 2 starts this month but one has to subscribe to the HBO channel on Amazon Prime, and that costs US$14.99 a month for access to the HBO channel with all its content. I hope there will be a DVD coming out after the season is over.

        One odd thing about this DVD is that there is no DVD region mentioned in the item’s description. Only that the format is NTSC, the USA TV format; also the product reviews are from people who bought the DVD in Canada or the USA.

        So it looks like “region 1” is implicit in the preceding paragraph.

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      • #2312908
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Terry Gilliam’s Brazil (1985).

        “The film centres on Sam Lowry, a low ranking bureaucrat trying to find a woman who appears in his dreams while he is working in a mind-numbing job and living in a small apartment, set in a dystopian world in which there is an over-reliance on poorly maintained (and rather whimsical) machines. Brazil’s satire of bureaucratic, technocratic, terrorism, and an hyper-surveillance, state capitalist like totalitarian government is reminiscent of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four[11][12][13] and has been called Kafkaesque[14] and absurdist.[13]”

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      • #2312916
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Terry Gilliam is one of the most creative movie makers and all-around artists of our times: besides designing the wacky, surreal and very funny cartons in “Monty Python Flying Circus”, the famous British comedy show where he also acted in some of the sketches, or conducting to substantial acclaim operas such as “The Damnation of Faust” by Berlioz, he has made, among others, such movies as:

        “Time Bandits” and “The Adventures of Baron Munchhausen” that I recommend watching, as these are as great a pair of fantasy movies as one is likely to see.

        “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnasus”, another great fantasy movie and the last one with the late Heath Ledger, who had a very important part, playing a manifestation of the Devil, and who died while the movie was still in production and had to be replaced with great difficulty. (Something, by the way, of a theme in Gilliam’s career: great difficulties, many frustrations, due to sheer bad luck — and to his predilection for attempting movies that are both technically difficult and very expensive to make.)

        And the dark science fiction/psychological/political drama aptly described by Alex: “Brazil.”

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      • #2313075
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        After 15 seasons, the longest running sci fi series in the US is coming to an end. Baby, it’s the final ride for saving people and hunting things.

        Supernatural (on TVmaze)

        “Supernatural is an American television series created by Eric Kripke. It was first broadcast on September 13, 2005, on The WB, and subsequently became part of successor The CW’s lineup. Starring Jared Padalecki as Sam Winchester and Jensen Ackles as Dean Winchester, the series follows the two brothers as they hunt demons, ghosts, monsters, and other supernatural beings..”

        I have followed all 15 seasons. Will watch the last S15E20 tonight.
        I was a great ride.
        The series has much more the just hunting monsters and season 15 was extraordinary (don’t want to spoil the punch of the last episodes, and oh, there was an earth shattering blow).

        • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by Alex5723.
        • #2313083
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          First of all, I have been trying to figure out which famous science fiction TV show might not have been mentioned, showcased and recommended here already, but could not think of any. So, instead, I decided to farm this out to Rolling Stone, where they reacted most enthusiastically to my request and came up with this article listing, with pictures and comments, the 50 best science fiction TV shows of all time:

          https://www.rollingstone.com/tv/tv-lists/best-science-fiction-tv-shows-of-all-time-65434/the-100-2014-present-150368/

          Now, to Alex’s positive comment on “Supernatural”:

          Stories of the supernatural, mostly meaning things that go bump in the night, are really fantasy/horror: ghost or poltergeist stories, for example. But since you liked “Supernatural”, I wonder if you might have seen already “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” (included in the Rolling Stones list, by the way.) Monsters galore there (the town is built on one of the gates of hell), so monsters and all manner of demons — vampires too, of course — infest the place whose citizens seem strangely unconcerned… Maybe that is because they are extra-laid-back Californians? It run for seven seasons between 1998 and 2005 and that was, I think, the right length for this show.

          Now, some real-life spooky things I personally know about: Near Naples, in Italy, there is a lake called Lago d’Averno. I had read in Virgil’s “Aeneida” that the entrance to hell is around there, hence the name. So, one day when I was in the area, went to this lake and walked all the way around it, but found no such gate, not even a little puff of sulfur. Then I climbed a nearby hill in Cumae, that overlooks the Tyrrenian sea and used to have a small temple on top, some of the stones are still there, and then went down a bit to the cave where the Sybil used to prophesize the future. It was quite empty at the time.

          But in Sunnydale, Buffy’s town, they had the real thing. There is another of those gates in Cleveland, according to Buffy’s mentor, Giles.

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      • #2313100
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I wonder if you might have seen already “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”

        I have seem and have “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” in my Tv series collection.

        There are gates to other worlds, H***.. in “Supernatural”.

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        • #2313105
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”? I thought its about the best sci-fi show ever, not soap opera 🙂

          I apologize, that was just rude from me. Its your opinion and I must respect it.

          And I have to admit, that I watched “Charmed”, but sipmly because I “was in love” with Holly Marie Combs, I watched that because of her.

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      • #2313231
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        A brief note on what is “science fiction”: it is speculative fiction that deals with the possibilities open by our present scientific understanding of the workings of the Universe (a.k.a. the “physical sciences”) and perhaps such extensions to it as the possibility of faster that light travel and time travel (the latter not impossible according to relativity theory, just requiring immense amounts of energy, but opened to question by quantum theory). And a literary form that also deals with the possible consequences of the use of technology based on our very understanding of physics.

        So it is mostly a way to package serious philosophical concerns into page-turning novels and shorter stories. Except for a few books, such as  Olaf Stapledon’s  “Star Maker”, that is pure speculation as to how life and conscience has and still might evolve in the Cosmos over future aeons.

        Anything else is something else. But, please, do not let this statement of mine make anyone here hesitate to post comments on what is now days broadly called “science fiction” when it comes to movies and TV shows. As far as I am concerned, nearly everything there is grist for this thread’s mill.

        After all, how much is about the real old “Far West” in “Western” films? Mark Twain, in “Roughing It”, long ago made it clear that it was not all that was pictured to be. Still, I love to watch “Winchester 73.”

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      • #2313246
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        So, instead, I decided to farm this out to Rolling Stone,

        You got in touch with Rolling Stone? Your very self?

        I’ve been looking over the list and I’m liking it. I don’t know many of the shows and will graze through it for some gnew ones, thanks 🙂

        Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
      • #2313248
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        “Time Bandits” and “The Adventures of Baron Munchhausen” that I recommend watching, as these are as great a pair of fantasy movies as one is likely to see. “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnasus”,

        I dug/dig all of those. I might include Gilliam’s Brazil because of its steam-punkish fantasy tech. Robert De Niro as an outlaw, “Robin Hood” plumber is one of my favorite sequences.

        Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
      • #2313249
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        Far from being even close to ‘the best’ but way before COVID-19.
        Mimic movie series.

        “In Manhattan, cockroaches are spreading the deadly “Strickler’s disease” that is claiming hundreds of the city’s children. Dr. Peter Mann, Deputy Director of the CDC, recruits entomologist Dr. Susan Tyler, who uses genetic engineering to create what she calls the Judas breed, a hybrid between a mantis and a termite that releases an enzyme which accelerates the roaches’ metabolism, thus causing them to starve to death faster than they can nourish themselves. The disease is successfully eradicated….”

        Mimic (1997)
        Mimic 2 (2001)
        Mimic: Sentinel (2003)

        Good movies! Plus, I’ll watch anything with Mira Sorvino in it 😉

        Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
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      • #2313250
        noblame no gain
        AskWoody Lounger

        you all so lame. Philbrook in “I led three lives”

        be well, breathe and honor wabi sabi

      • #2313380
        RamRod
        AskWoody Plus

        John Carter of Mars. By Edgar Rice Burroughs. And the Disney movie.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2313394
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I read “John Carter” (and enjoyed it) as I read several others of ERB’s books (the Tarzan ones, the hollow Earth ones) as a teenager. I have not seen the movie. The movie did not get good reviews, whatever that means. The trailer looks quite impressive:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-iW_LrpY6c

          Looking around, I’ve found that the movie can be rented or bought in Amazon Prime and the DVD is available in Netflix.

          The book was a life-long inspiration to Carl Sagan, having read it as a child, that motivated him as a grown up, even while recognizing that the novel was a fantasy, to push hard to NASA the idea of sending people to Mars, with significant, if less than complete success so far. The present attempts to find life there with dedicated robotic missions is one of the consequences of his efforts. His, by then, ex-wife Professor Lynn Margulis, a distinguished biologist whom I once met, worked with him in his late years and popularized the idea of exploring Mars, looking for life there.

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          • #2313472
            RebusCom
            AskWoody Plus

            The John Carter movie was a very pleasant surprise.  Bad reviews were unwarranted. It was very well done and I highly recommend it.  It’s a mix of fantasy and science fiction, mostly the former, but the movie does not come across as a half-baked, low budget rip-off but has just as much story, cinematography and special effects as the Star Wars series.  Definitely worth your time and popcorn.

            • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by RebusCom.
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      • #2313475
        RebusCom
        AskWoody Plus

        Another movie that like John Carter exceeds expectations, especially in light of the cheezy sounding title, is Cowboys and Aliens.  I think it’s in part due to the low expectations that it kind of blows you away.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-MAuPR00M

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        • #2313641
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Cowboys and Aliens is a great movie. Classic Cowboy look with aliens as the baddies, really good SFX and a cast that plays along nicely.

          If you like that idea try Bone Tomahawk, modern setting, horror, but no cowboys.

          cheers, Paul

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      • #2313545
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        “Cowboys and Aliens” (which I still have to watch) seems to have suffered from the same negative reception due to the kind of prejudice against mixed genres than other work, notably what the TV show “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” got early on, because of its mixture of fantasy, horror and comedy.

        Looking it up on Wikipedia I have found the following excerpts of a positive and a less positive reviews:

        Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing that “as preposterous moneymakers go, it’s ambitious and well-made. The acting from the large cast is of a high standard, Craig and Ford were more or less born into their roles, and director Jon Favreau actually develops his characters and gives them things to do, instead of posing them in front of special effects.” He lamented that the film was not a pure Western, saying of the aliens, “[T]here is more genuine suspense when [Percy Dolarhyde] starts shooting up the town than when countless aliens appear”. Salon’s Andrew O’Hehir offered a mixed response, claiming the film to be well made and clever, and singling out Craig and Ford for their performances. O’Hehir was critical of the combination of western and science-fiction elements, calling it “a mediocre western clumsily welded to a mediocre alien shoot-’em-up”.”

        On the other hand, another mix of Western and science fiction, “Firefly”, did extremely well in terms of public’s acceptance, but run afoul of those in charge of running the show at Fox TV who then, to be consistent, decided to cancel it after just one session.

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      • #2313548
        RebusCom
        AskWoody Plus

        Yet another movie that received critical reviews but exceeded expectations and I very much enjoyed is Jupiter Rising.  It’s described as a Space Opera, another mix of fantasy and science fiction.  It’s from the writers and director of The Matrix trilogy. Special effects are first rate.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4ZzMkDLjWI

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      • #2313601
        RamRod
        AskWoody Plus

        Silent Running. Bruce Dern, 1972. Prophetic environmentalism?

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2313745
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          Yes, even in 1972 they knew that planet Earth was, or would be in big trouble in the future.  What I wonder is how animal life could still live on Earth without vegatation to create oxygen.  It was a good movie though even if it was a bit prophetic.

      • #2313625
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        “Silent Watching” came out some years after Kubrick’s “2001” and so it had scenes showing the Earth as it is actually seen from space, particularly the thin blue ring of the atmosphere all the way around the limb. For its time, it was also a very effective, which means scary and highly dramatic science fiction thriller. The story is that the effects of some world-wide catastrophe has killed all trees and many useful plants, except the few safely grown in an arboretums cum green houses in orbit around Saturn. At some point, the government in charge sends order to destroy them, and space forces are deployed as well:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_Running

        As far as I remember it, this movie’s plot works well if one overlooks these two flaws:

        (1) Why bother to put the arboretum-greenhouses in outer space when it could much more easily have been built and maintained on Earth? One reason could be that a nuclear war or asteroid impact catastrophe has created a “nuclear winter” scenario that will last a very long time. If so, this is not mentioned.

        (2) Why bother to destroy it? After all, if government budgetary constraints were the reason, the cost of running the arboretum-greenhouses could be kept down to near nothing, as it becomes clear in the course of the movie that they can keep going without external assistance for very long times.

        But if one overlooks the above two points, then this movie was interesting in an intense sort of way that held audiences in its grip long enough, first to keep them watching it through to the end and then to discuss it seriously afterwards. And, in this way, confirming it as the milestone in science fiction film history that it rightly is.

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        • #2313955
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Sorry, I just realized I wrote “Silent Watching” rather than the correct name of this movie. Maybe because that is what I was doing when I first saw it. For me it was definitely a “sounds off” kind of event.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2313695
        shrdlu
        AskWoody Plus

        I can’t believe not one mention of “Max Headroom”. For my money the best SF show ever. It was followed closely by “The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr.” a SF Western. Both are fantastic shows.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2313698
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        As a czech contributor to this forum, I have to bring one revolutionary piece of czech cinematography. From year 1955 with special visual effects. Maybe it was important for whole movie industry all over the world, I dont know. I do not remember many things from 1950s with “special visual effects”.

        Journey to the Beginning of Time

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        • #2313933
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks, Doriel. It looks like this is the complete movie:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vF5QWSKbZ1o

          Either this has been dubbed to American English in a very convincing way, or this is not the Czech movie of the same name. But the notes say it is …

          And, concerning the question, in the movie’s voiceover, of whether birds are related to dinosaurs? Well, yes. More so, because they are now days considered to be dinosaurs, the last and probably the more numerous and varied of their kind, the result of a process of evolution started long before the asteroid impact:

          https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-dinosaurs-shrank-and-became-birds/

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          • #2313940
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Actually the link in my previous comment is not to the complete movie, because the video so linked lack the last twenty minutes. The complete movie is here:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eQehzEJyHg

            By the way, when this movie was made, the idea of a primordial “Big Bang” as the beginning of time, the Universe and everything was not yet around. And it still is being argued, worked on, refined and modified, so we have not yet arrived to a definitive answer. Although the “Big Bang” in its present form is supposed to be essentially correct from a few instants after the beginning onwards.

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            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2314005
              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              The BBT has been around formally since 1931.

              In 1931, Lemaître proposed in his “hypothèse de l’atome primitif” (hypothesis of the primeval atom) that the universe began with the “explosion” of the “primeval atom”

              cheers, Paul

              • #2314015
                doriel
                AskWoody Lounger

                Guys, if you are interested in universe, you MUST read this. Its not TV show, but its one of the best books I read and I also gave it to my friend on christmass. I love universe!

                John D. Barrow: The book of universes

                Book is divided into small chapters, which goes chronologically, how human kind evolved. it begins in ancient times, where people were looking at the sky and they thought it is all static..

                And it goes on and on until these days. It is true that Georges Lemaitre came with this idea, but observations about expanding universe came much much later with great telescopes. Also revolutionary was research done by Wilson and Penzias with measusring radiation. They tought their measurments was mistake and they blame pigeons for ruining their work. But eventually they came to conclusion that it is corrrect and there is relic radiation. So they knew that Lemaitre could be correct.

                Thanks @OscarCP
                That link is the movie I was talking about 🙂

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                • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by doriel. Reason: spelling errors
                • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by doriel. Reason: oh grammar
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          • #2314006
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            because they are now days considered to be dinosaurs

            They are considered to be birds. They probably evolved from small dinosaurs.

            cheers, Paul

            • #2314027
              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              Paul_T: “They are considered to be birds. They probably evolved from small dinosaurs.

              Some think that way, some think otherwise:

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_birds

              The present scientific consensus is that birds are a group of maniraptoran theropod dinosaurs originated during the Mesozoic Era.

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      • #2313931
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        shrdlu: ” I can’t believe not one mention of “Max Headroom”

        It was included in the Rolling Stone’s “50 best science fiction TV shows of all time” I gave the URL link here #2313083

        Are you referring to the British original or the American version? I am familiar, for having watched it, with the latter and also have the complete DVDs of the two seasons.

        British:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Headroom

        American:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Headroom_(TV_series)

        It was a great show (although I have read comments asserting that the British original was better) and I do have all the DVDs. The main idea was that, back in the 80s (when the show was running), there was what is now known as an “Artificial Intelligence”, or AI,  with a witty and even sarcastic personality, helping out an investigative journalist by running loose inside a computer network and stealing secret information that was then used to disrupt the evil doings of a TV network that was constantly brainwashing the TV-addicted masses with its programming.

         

         

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        • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by OscarCP.
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      • #2314007
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        (although I have read comments asserting that the British original was better)

        Every American remake of any none American movie/TV show is worse than the source. I recently watched both versions of ‘Utopia‘ (UK, US) and the UK version was much better. The same fate has ‘Black Mirror’ and many others.
        On the other hand, a none American remake of an American movie/TV show can be better than the source. Example : The great US ‘Unforgiven‘ movie has an even greater Japanese 2013 version.
        Other example UK ‘The Prisoner‘, Korean ‘Oldboy‘…US remakes were horrible.

        ps. Out of the best 50 TV Shows I have seen 44.:-)

        • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by Alex5723.
        • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by Alex5723.
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        • #2314028
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex: “On the other hand, a none American remake of an American movie/TV show can be better than the source. Example : The great US Unforgiven movie has an even greater Japanese 2013 version.

          Well, ripping off a great US Western movie by the Japanese to make a samurai movie is nothing more nor less than payback for the US ripping off “The Seven Samurai” to make “The Magnificent Seven”, a Western movie. (Which was not that bad, for an ‘merican Western movie, by the way.)

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      • #2315797
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        In case someone has a chance to see it, I recommend the British Sky TV show “COBRA.” This acronym stands for “Cabinet Office Briefing Rooms Assembly”, or get together of ministers and other relevant persons in a designated briefing room, possibly in the Prime Minister’s nominal residence at 10 Downing St., something that happens several times in the course of this first season.

        It is essentially a disaster science fiction story, but based on very real events that have happened, the last time in 1859,  and still possible in the future: a gigantic solar flare has been detected that is bound to reach Earth in a few days and its electromagnetic interaction with susceptible terrestrial infrastructure can be expected to cause very serious damage to the electric power grid, as well as to communication and navigation satellites, all this likely to be very disruptive of normal life. The science is unusually well-explained in the COBRA briefing scene of the first episode. For example, a spacecraft in a stable orbit at the so-called Earth’s L1 Lagrange point in space, so that, as seen from Earth, it is always placed between it and the Sun, has been designed to observe the Sun and its magnetic field fluctuations (NASA and ESA have deployed such spacecraft) and is going to send data revealing that the magnetic field of the incoming blast is opposite (South pointing) to the North direction of the Earth magnetic field, making the latter weaker and so allowing more of the blast to reach the Earth than otherwise.

        This show is well acted and impressibly photographed. There are some remarkably convincing large-scale scenes of the crash of an airliner on a main highway, because of the sudden failure of the navigation satellites (e.g. those of GPS); of a field of refugee tents; of large scale riots, and of several other aspects of the serious likely consequences both humanitarian and political of the massive blackouts caused by the solar flare. And lots of “The East Wing”-like melodrama, very well done, in my opinion.

        The first season, in the USA, can be streamed from TV stations affiliated with the Public Broadcasting System, previous payment to get the permit, or “Passport”, valid for seeing all PBS shows for one year.

        A second season has been announced for next year.

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      • #2316123
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        The Lobster (2015)

        “David is escorted to a hotel after his wife has left him for another man. The hotel manager reveals that single people have 45 days to find a partner, or they will be transformed into an animal of their choice; the dog accompanying David is his brother. David chooses to become a lobster.”…

        • #2317027
          Michael Austin
          AskWoody Plus

          The Lobster was so strange and surreal I sat through it just to see how it would end.

          Finance, social and tech founder. Co-founder of a global, gamified, crowd-sourced ESG advertising platform, and managing director of new crowd sourced games, both in pre-release development. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.
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      • #2316194
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex,

        Well, “The Lobster”, that you seem to be recommending, according to some Rotten Tomatoes scribe is “an acquired taste.” OK, so here is my own favorite acquired taste:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Jones_and_the_Kingdom_of_the_Crystal_Skull

        Yes, indeed. Although too often maligned by Indiana Jones fans, I must say it is one of my favorite Indiana Jones movies. So, there. Why you may ask. For a start, it has Cate Blanchett in the role of The Super-villainess Mastermind of Bad, which she does perfectly, as usual. Anything with Cate Blanchett has my immediate admiration. Particularly considering she is an Aussie who, after a bad start in life (she was born in Melbourne) did the right thing and became a proper Sydneysider by moving to Sydney and graduating, once there, from NIDA (the National Institute of Dramatic Art). And the rest is history. Say no more.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cate_Blanchett

        The plot is also satisfactorily full of surprises, of action, as well as of the violent disposal of several bad people that get in the way. One of the surprises include Indiana being blown away inside a fridge by a nuclear explosion. One does not see that every day.

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      • #2316202
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Better than us is very good too. Not the best SciFi ever, but really consider watching this. Robots amongst us and lot more 🙂

        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8285216/

        Netflix series, Ukranian creation.

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        • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by doriel.
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        • #2316327
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks, Doriel, One does not get often a chance of watching science fiction shows as this one, made outside the English-speaking countries of North America and the UK. This show is available to stream from Netflix, at least in the USA,where it can be seen dubbed in English.

          I find it remarkable that the Ukrainians, with all the troubles they are having in their far eastern border region and the Crimea, can find the resources to make a science fiction show that, at least on the technical side and judging from that trailer you’ve given us a link to, looks quite well-made. But I imagine that, because of those troubles, good entertainment easily available to the wider public is also something of a necessity.

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          • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by OscarCP.
      • #2316215
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I think ‘Better than us’ is a remake of British ‘ Humans‘ series which itself was a remake of Swedish ‘Real Humans‘.

        “The series focuses on the social, cultural, and psychological impact of the invention of anthropomorphic robots called “synths”. It explores a number of science fiction themes, including artificial intelligence, consciousness, human-robot interaction, superintelligence, mind uploading[1] and the laws of robotics”

        • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
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        • #2316216
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          Oh, thanks. I did not know that, I just “discovered” that TV series recently. I didnt now it has roots in the past. Thanks for interesting fact.

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      • #2316256
        apollo130470
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’m going with the ‘The Expanse’… big time.
        Something realistic was badly needed for the genre.

        10 out of 10 on the science,
        10 out of 10 for the fiction.

        As far as the science goes,
        everything in The Expanse is doable or achievable over the next 50 to 100 years.
        Interstellar flight is a fanciful dream, but totally unrealistic.
        Unless you’re a Star Trek fan of course, they swallow just about anything.

        • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by apollo130470.
        • #2316642
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          I am also a fan of The Expanse. Real physics for the ships, those dopey Space Western dog fights from Star Wars, complete with sound effects just disappoint me.
          I just finished watching the 4th season and was thinking the 5th was already out.
          I have no problem with FTL in scifi, or with the Ring in the Expanse they would be examples of ‘unknown physics’ vs. the ‘known wrong physics’ of dog fights in space.

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2316293
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        One of the best sci-fi ‘The Thirteenth Floor (1999)’

        “In 1999 Los Angeles, Hannon Fuller (Mueller-Stahl) owns a multibillion-dollar computer enterprise and is the inventor of a newly completed virtual reality (VR) simulation of 1937 Los Angeles, filled with simulated humans unaware they are computer programs. When Fuller is murdered just as he begins premature testing of the VR system, his friend and protégé, Douglas Hall (Bierko), who is also the heir to the company, becomes the primary suspect. The evidence against him is so strong that Hall begins to doubt his own innocence.”

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      • #2316348
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex quoted from the “Thirteen Floor” article: “… a newly completed virtual reality (VR) simulation of 1937 Los Angeles, filled with simulated humans unaware they are computer programs.

        The idea of a show or movie about people living in realistic simulations is not new (e.g. the 1998 movies “The Truman Show” and “Dark City”), but the idea that the whole Universe is a simulation run in an immense computer by some very advance being or beings and that we are also parts of it, as mere subroutines of the main cosmic program, is an idea that physicists with a liking for philosophical speculation have been putting forward for years now. The thing about this kind of speculation is that cannot be disproven by showing that contradicts some basic law of physics, but cannot be shown to be correct based on evidence, evidence that is impossible to obtain now and, perhaps, never to be obtained by any conceivable means:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simulation_hypothesis

        A somewhat related idea (the Universe inside a locket that is itself inside another Universe)  is suggested in the very last scene of “Men in Black II”

        Then there is the hypothesis of the existence of the “Bolzmann Brains”, brain-like objects that appear out of nowhere, as quantum fluctuations, and might explain some peculiar issues in modern physics:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain

        When applied to more recent theories about the multiverse, Boltzmann brain arguments are part of the unsolved measure problem of cosmology. Boltzmann brains remain a thought experiment; physicists do not believe that humans are actually Boltzmann brains, but rather use the thought experiment as a tool for evaluating competing scientific theories.

        The idea of giant brains from outer space coming here to take over the world is the basis of the plot of an episode of “Futurama.”

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      • #2316781
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        The sci-fi in Rick and Morty is my favourite. Infinite universes and portal guns are always entertaining, if you use them properly.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2316783
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        but the idea that the whole Universe is a simulation run in an immense computer by some very advance being or beings and that we are also parts of it, as mere subroutines of the main cosmic program, is an idea that physicists with a liking for philosophical speculation have been putting forward for years now.

        I believe in this VR theory. “some very advance being or beings” are the GOD/S we worship.

        • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
      • #2316980
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex: “I believe in this VR theory. “some very advance being or beings” are the GOD/S we worship.

        Well, not exactly. The “simulation theory” does not describe the entities running the simulated universe as any god or gods people actually worship, as described in their religious scriptures and later theological elaborations (e.g. in Thomas Aquinas’ “Summa Theologica” (*)). From our (simulated?) point of view, they might be god-like, but are none of the gods people believe in. Unless one starts one’s own religion claiming that they are; that would change things.

        (*) Where it is written that God exists outside of time and of space, which, I must reluctantly admit, could be one point in favor of Alex, if Aquinas had meant our simulated time and space, which he did not.)

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      • #2316981
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And now some good streaming news for fans of “Dune” and “The Matrix” (at least if they have HBO):

        https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55180055

         

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2317168
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Netflix has streamed starting Dec. 1 : Stargate SG-1 Seasons 1-10

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      • #2317398
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Aaron Guzikowski and Ridley Scott “Raised by Wolves.” The complete 1st season already out in the USA on HBO and starting now in the UK on Sky TV. Renewed for a 2nd season.

        Wikipedia:

        American science fiction drama television series created by Aaron Guzikowski that premiered on HBO Max on September 3, 2020. The first two episodes were directed by Ridley Scott, who also serves as an executive producer for the show. In September 2020, the series was renewed for a second season.

        Ridley Scott produces this twist-laden sci-fi drama telling the story of two androids, Father (Abubakar Salim) and Mother (Amanda Collin), who are tasked in the 22nd Century with raising human children on the planet Kepler-22b after Earth has been ravaged by war. Tonight’s opener finds the androids having escaped the violent conflict between a religious order and atheist rebellion on Earth with human embryos to start a new civilisation. 12 years on and only one child has survived – or so they think.

        Trailer:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRMVtm2voVA

        1st Episode (Full) :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIAIiw8UAfA

        (Also being shown in the UK on Sky Atlantic.)

        These are tough times for making movies and TV/Streaming shows: Covid-19 causing delays and cancellations.
        What is it like making them now?
        What is it going to be likely once this pandemic has finally run its course?

        As good science fiction shows are few and far between at the best of times, the loss of just one is going to be a truly unhappy outcome.

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/road-to-recovery/2020/11/25/tv-production-covid-lessons/

        https://variety.com/2020/film/news/film-sets-hollywood-pandemic-1234826994/

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      • #2317405
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Film: Outland. Sean Connery.

        On Hiatus {with backup and coffee}
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      • #2317427
        anonymous
        Guest

        Edge of Tomorrow (Live Die Repeat) – Tom Cruise & Emily Blunt

        And how about ‘The Adjustment Burea’ with Matt Damon and Emily Blunt.

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        • #2317574
          anonymous
          Guest

          The movie, in contrast to a series.

      • #2317463
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        “Raised by Wolves.”

        Saw that. Nothing special. Can be skipped. Won’t watch 2nd season.

        The Adjustment Bureau is good.

        • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
        • #2317481
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex: “Nothing special” Well, it’s got some very good reviews, some less so. And it’s from Ridley Scott, so it is at least worth having a look to make up one’s mind.

          From watching the first full episode posted in YouTube (the link to it is in my comment further up), I would say, judging from this sample, that it seems promising. Would I open an account with HBO Plus, agreeing to pay a monthly fee thereafter just to watch the complete show? Probably not. But if the first season shows up later on, same as HBO’s “His Dark Materials”, in PBS or some other place I have access to, or a DVD version of the first series is released, would I watch it this way? Probably yes, I would.

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      • #2319419
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        After considering carefully what I could add here today that has not been discussed already,  instead decided to indulge myself and tell you about something I have been doing over the last three weeks: I have been watching, complete from beginning to end and for the eight time since its last episode ended in May 0f 2003, that immortal work of cinematic art, that amazing and unique combination of ensemble acting, serious drama, really scary horror, touching romance, tragic falling outs, wacky sitcom, risque “adult-themed” scenes, outright camp, New Agey conceits, pure straight magic, sketchy science fiction and more, much more — with one old fashioned musical movie-style episode thrown in with much singing and dancing and a plot that was also a crucial point in the overall arc of the story. And a (literally) hard-hitting feminist message. So what is this wonder of wonders?

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffy_the_Vampire_Slayer

        Born of the creative mind of Joss Whedon, produced by the company founded and also funded by Dolly Parton “Sand Dollar Productions”, with a group of gifted young actors, here real talents met other real talents and together danced a graceful minuet.

        In 2017, the cast got together to celebrate the 20th year from the beginning of the show in 1997. To give its fans a trip down memory lane and to those unfamiliar with this show a taste of what it was all about here is this video of that reunion of the whole cast and the series’ creator with much discussion of what the show meant:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQ1nDKsILsM

        Having watch it once again, I can say that it doesn’t get old, except that the laptops that Willow uses to break online into every conceivable data base, the more secret and heavily defended the better, tend to look a bit chunkier every time I watch the series again.

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      • #2319420
        MHCLV941
        AskWoody Plus

        the show just soared (so to speak) on the storylines.

        Back in the day, reruns of the original Star Trek episodes were all-but-mandatory viewing for the first-class cadets (seniors) during my days at the USAF Academy.

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      • #2319557
        KB6OJS
        AskWoody Plus

        This is Wavy’s fault ( #2013698 ), because he wrote elsewhere (and way off topic, I must add) that the best science fiction EVER is ‘The Expanse’, that one can watch right now in Amazon Prime.

        I disagree, most bitterly: The best science fiction show, ever, was “Firefly”:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefly_(TV_series)

        And, although it is harder to classify as such, the best SF show that lasted longer than one season was, unquestionably, ‘Futurama’:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurama

        Feel free to dissent here.

        • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by OscarCP.

        It’s really hard to choose a total favorite.  There have been so many.

        However, there are a few that stand above the rest: Star Trek, Babylon 5, and Stargate SG-1.

        All of these provide rich environments for many tales.

        Star Trek is one we all know.  The three seasons of the original 1966-1969 series launched an enormous universe of very successful spin-off shows, several great theatrical movies, and the most recent reboot with Chris Pine and company, not to mention a couple hundred novels!  It’s become such a fixture in today’s society that much of the things brought to us by Gene Roddenberry have become cliches today, such as “Beam me up, Scotty,” “He’s dead, Jim” and the Vulcan “V” hand greeting.

        Babylon 5 didn’t create much in the way of spin-off shows like the others (there were a few made-for-TV movies and one spin-off series, Crusade, that only went one season).  But B5 did create a wealthy environment of possibilities for future exploration, limited only by the short-sightedness of the studios.  Had it not been created as a five-season story arc to begin with, it would have probably been easier to sell the studios on expanding it.  There are talks of a new show in the B5 universe, but those rumors have been floating around for years.

        Stargate: SG-1 generated two spin-off series — the excellent Stargate: Atlantis and the not-quite-so-great Stargate: Universe (and unfortunately a Saturday-morning animated show that was hardly worth mentioning.)  There were also two great direct-to-DVD movies that tied up some story lines that needed conclusions.  And of course, quite a few novels of its own.

        I’ll also mention the reboot of Battlestar Galactica.  (The original Galactica one-season-wonder — two if you count Galactica 1980 — was good, but that implementation was a little cheesy.  Still, it set the stage for the awesome reboot.)  Had it not been brought to such a dramatic conclusion with the series finale, it might have gone on for a few more seasons.  They did do a couple of attempts at extending the Galactica universe, such as the Caprica series, and the direct-to-DVD movies “Blood and Chrome” and “The Plan,” all of which I enjoyed thoroughly. Unfortunately, Caprica only went a couple of seasons and was dropped.

        You’ll note that I didn’t include Star Wars in my offerings.  Star Wars was not a TV series, therefore by definition is excluded from the list.  Had it been otherwise, it certainly would have made the cut!  So, those of you who are huge Star Wars fans, please put down your pitchforks! 🙂

        //Steve//

        Moderator Note: Edit to remove HTML. Please use the “Text” tab when you copy/paste.

         

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        • #2319613
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          KB6OJS: It is OK to discuss science fiction movies here; quite a few of those already have been.

          Also, as you probably know, in Star Trek Kirk never actually said “Beam me up Scotty.” But this being even now such a common place shows the deep cultural influence of the original Star Trek series, as it is a line the Kirk character might very well have said. Much like the lasting influence of Shakespeare’s work is implicit in the saying “To gild the lily”, meaning to do something unnecessary, that is a misquote of the line in “King John” of the same meaning: “To gild refined gold, or paint the lily”.

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      • #2319667
        Latka
        AskWoody Plus

        A somewhat related idea (the Universe inside a locket that is itself inside another Universe)

        See also, Whoville, in Horton Hears a Who, by Dr. Seuss.

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        • #2319676
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Whoville is also in “The Grinch that Stole Christmas”:

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whoville

          In  the first”Men in Black” it was not a tiny city inside a clover flower or a snowflake, but either the whole Universe, or else just one galaxy, maybe the one we live in, contained in a locket, or a jewel that a god-like infant is seen playing with in the very last scene of the movie. Hard to forget that.

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      • #2319670
        tarstarkas27
        AskWoody Lounger

        Babylon 5 was one of the best-scripted Sci-fi shows ever. The diversity of the alien races had a rich history to go with it. The characters were original, diverse, strong, and compelling. The overall story arc encompassed several plot lines including stand-alone episodes that were outstanding on their own merits. The writer J. Michael Straczynski had envisioned the entire 5 seasons ahead of time so it had a coherent beginning, middle, and very satisfying ending. Truly a show that proved itself by running all 5 seasons without the threat of cancellation. An international cast provided excellent portrayals of the major characters. The Vorlon race, in particular, was an inspired concept. Those of you who may be too young to have seen it when it was originally broadcast should try to find it now. You won’t be disappointed.

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        • #2319691
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          tarstarkas27: To me, Babylon 5 was and still remains, after all these years, one of the most original, imaginative and intelligently written science fiction shows ever made.

          If you search the string “Babylon 5” here you’ll find that several people agree with your comments.

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      • #2319690
        anonymous
        Guest

        I have enjoyed most of these programs, I am surprised that no one mentioned Gene Roddenberry’s “Earth Final Conflct”. It had refreshingly different alien technology and interesting aliens. (Alien technology in most shows is all the same “future Earth” technology, but not in this one.) I am glad that Andromeda was mentioned, and the original Battlestar Galactica. I would be sad if they were forgotten.

      • #2319704
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I don’t think that one of the greatest of science fiction movies ever made has been mentioned here already, so this is my small weak, poor, undeserving, pathetic, grovelling at the feet of greatness attempt to correct this gravest of omissions:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_Quest

        To those unfortunates that have not seen it yet: Watch the trailer and weep tears of regret for what you have been missing in your lives until right now:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzwJgFhMbL4

         

         

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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        • #2320800
          KB6OJS
          AskWoody Plus

          Galaxy Quest was indeed a great movie, not only for the science-fiction part but for its lampooning the fans that sometimes go <span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>way </span>over the top — but even so, look who saves the day!

      • #2319899
        jackpet
        AskWoody Plus

        The newer version of Battle Star Galactica is my favorite.

        – Jack

      • #2319922
        anonymous
        Guest

        The original Battlestar Galactica and Stargate SG-1 get my vote. Enough said.

      • #2319984
        J-Mac
        AskWoody Lounger

        Life on Mars, the original BBC version, was different but excellent in my opinion. There was an American copy but it ended after one season with a much poorer ending. Definitely worth a watch!

         

        Jim

        • #2319990
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          J-Mac: “Life on Mars” certainly has had a lot of international repercussion, judging by all the versions in different languages produced in various countries:

          From Wikipedia:

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_on_Mars_(British_TV_series)#cite_note-3

          An American adaptation of the series was produced by ABC and ran for one season from October 2008 to April 2009. A Spanish adaptation of the series was broadcast from April to June 2009. A Russian adaptation of the series entitled The Dark Side of the Moon was broadcast in November 2012. A Czech adaptation World under the Head was broadcast by Czech Television from January to March 2017. The South Korean adaptation began broadcasting in June 2018. In February 2019, the BBC announced the production of a Chinese version, to be set in the 1990s. A sequel to the series, Ashes to Ashes, whose title references another David Bowie song, aired on BBC One from February 2008 to May 2010.

          Now I have thought of mentioning here a science-fiction topic that not often, or perhaps ever before has been discussed in this thread:

          Alternate story science fiction: what if the past were different in some critical aspect, perhaps in some alternate universe very much like ours, except for some crucial aspect, or in a timeline that diverged from ours by the work of some quantum magician, or a busybody time traveler?

          https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/the-continuing-popularity-of-alternate-history-tv-shows

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      • #2320028
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        New season 5 of ‘The Expanse ‘ just aired on Amazon Prime.

        • #2320151
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          But not all at once after first couple one at a time like old fashioned TV

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2320294
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            “The Expanse”: Great special effects, high-values production better than in just about any show I’ve seen. Competent actors, intriguing twists and turns. Problem is, time and again, I cannot watch more than three or four episodes and then I just give up. Reason? Plenty of dark, violent drama, but no much of a sense of humor. If it were shorter, say feature movie length, I believe I might be a fan, but it just goes on and on like that, year in year out. Why does it matter? Well, because, as I see it, we live in a real world that has tragedy and nasty twists and turns and darkness in spades; particularly the darkness.

            So just by living here I get to experience plenty enough of real darkness already. I’m good with that, don’t need any more. Really don’t. If I wanted darkness and tragedy, I much rather read Shakespeare, that has some pretty good speeches now and then that make it well worth the time one takes reading any of his plays, with even some amusing bits, sprinkled here and there. And even have a point or two to make and do it very nicely, I must say.

            Sorry, that came out like a sermon. Don’t pay me any mind and enjoy the show.

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            • #2320373
              anonymous
              Guest

              That was my complaint about the Battlestar Galactica remake.  For the most part it was a portrayal of the dregs of humanity consistently behaving in the most selfish and self destructive manner, often in stupid/senseless ways, combined with jarring cinematography.

              The Expanse does have an abundance of greed, criminality and self-interest, but in a seemingly more realistic and elaborate science fiction wild west / frontier manner (where one would expect to find more social outcasts) and balanced with more realistic range of behaviors in the characters related to their backgrounds.  It’s more complex and nuanced with a lot more moving parts in the story to keep track of.

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              • #2320465
                OscarCP
                AskWoody Plus

                “The Expanse” also has a pretty impressive actress with the kind of voice that, in real life, usually takes a lot of cigarettes, booze and interesting living to get it as nicely low and raspy as that. But even so… Quoting Roger Ebert on a movie he admired the looks of, but not the content: “spectacle without a point.” Maybe too harsh, in this case, but close enough for me.

                I’ve been thinking more about it, because this is a show that deserves being thought about, even if it is to criticize it. And so I have thought that there is trivial tragedy and there is great tragedy. Trivial tragedy makes us emote for no great purpose; great tragedy inspires us to be better than we are, or even than we can be, but makes us feel that going for it still is worth a try. So I’ve thought of Sophocles’ “Antigone”, the young woman that stands up on principle against a king and faces a terrible death sentence that she cheats by killing herself first. In her defeat is her victory, because twenty five centuries after this work first was played to an audience of free citizens of Athens, it can still move and inspire us, and it well might still move and inspire others twenty five centuries hence.

                https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/o/the-oedipus-trilogy/play-summary/antigone

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              • #2320650
                doriel
                AskWoody Lounger

                “The Expanse” also has a pretty impressive actress with the kind of voice that, in real life, usually takes a lot of cigarettes, booze and interesting living to get it as nicely low and raspy as that.

                Thank you for that sentence, you wrote it very smoothly and very sensitively. I had really good and quite long laugh here, still smiling, thank you man 🙂 I will watch first episode, to see how things really are.

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            • #2320403
              wavy
              AskWoody Plus

              Well try the old fashioned way, one episode at a time.

              BTW I am looking for other good ones on Prime. Seems everytime I try one of the ones mentioned here that I have not watched Prime doesn’t have it or charges extra. Maybe time to explore Disney+ or Hulu or maybe even HBO.

              🍻

              Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2320646
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here is another excellent example of classic of science-fiction movie-making with plenty of darkness and tragedy, but also some incidental humor to lighten the mood:

        Mars Attacks.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqtjHWlM4lQ

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Attacks!

        There is some music that truly feels like it could do me in too (and is not by Beethoven or Bach).

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        • #2320649
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          Yes, Mars attacks is good and funny. If I was asked about Sci-Fi commedy I recommend this enormous gem of american commedy art. I really adore
          Space Balls, my friends 🙂 its as old as I am 🙂

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        • #2320651
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          There is something odd with the Wikipedia link: instead to the movie, it goes to an article of collector cards-themed on the movie. But right in the very first line of that “cards” page there is a link to the movie itself. The URL of both pages are identical. Now, this is exactly the sort of thing that could happen in the movie, so maybe …

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          • #2320652
            doriel
            AskWoody Lounger

            The link does not contain exclamation mark. If you add ! to address, it takes you to movie on wikipedia. I think the URL is created badly. (notice the explamation mark is not part of URL)

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      • #2320741
        Vincenzo
        AskWoody Lounger
      • #2320769
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        A new Stephen King ‘The Stand ‘ horror sci-fi TV series on on CBS All Access.

        The Stand is described as “King’s apocalyptic vision of a world decimated by plague and embroiled in an elemental struggle between good and evil. The fate of mankind rests on the frail shoulders of the 108-year-old Mother Abagail and a handful of survivors. Their worst nightmares are embodied by a man with a lethal smile and unspeakable powers.

        ‘The Stand’ has been previously made into a movie into 1994.

      • #2320795
        KB6OJS
        AskWoody Plus

        KB6OJS: It is OK to discuss science fiction movies here; quite a few of those already have been.

        Also, as you probably know, in Star Trek Kirk never actually said “Beam me up Scotty.” But this being even now such a common place shows the deep cultural influence of the original Star Trek series, as it is a line the Kirk character might very well have said. Much like the lasting influence of Shakespeare’s work is implicit in the saying “To gild the lily”, meaning to do something unnecessary, that is a misquote of the line in “King John” of the same meaning: “To gild refined gold, or paint the lily”.

        I know Kirk never said that as a direct quote, but it has become a modern-day cliche.  That was my point, sorry I didn’t make that clear.  My bad. 😉

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      • #2320801
        KB6OJS
        AskWoody Plus

        Did anyone see the BBC show, “Voyage to the Planets” or something like that?  Maybe that was the sub-title, I don’t remember.  I have the DVDs here somewhere but can’t find them to be sure.  That was a great piece of work!  Science fiction — a fictional voyage around the solar system — combined with a lot of science fact, at least as much as we know so far, about the various planets in our little corner of the galaxy.  I get it out every once in a while just to watch and enjoy it.  The “Beeb” did a great job with that one.

        • #2320828
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          KB6OJS: “Did anyone see the BBC show, “Voyage to the Planets” or something like that?

          I have not seen it. Could that BBC show be one I just found out? If it was, then the full title is: “Space Odyssey – Voyage to the Planets”:

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Odyssey_(TV_series)

          Excerpt:

          Space Odyssey: Voyage to the Planets (released as Voyage to the Planets and Beyond in the United States) is a 2004 British fictional documentary about a manned voyage through the solar system. Space Odyssey premiered in 2004 and was made by the BBC. It was written and directed by Joe Ahearne and produced by Christopher Riley, who was presented with the 2005 Sir Arthur Clarke Award for Best TV & Radio Presentation. ”

          ” ‘ The story is set at an unspecified time in the future, though in the accompanying book, the mission’s chief science officer recalls reading Arthur C. Clarke‘s 1982 novel, 2010, some 40 years earlier.

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      • #2320839
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here is a wacky British TV science-fiction show I wished I could see again, this time the whole two seasons:

        “Supernova.”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova_(TV_series)

        About a group of astronomers working in an observatory in the Australian outback. I saw part of the first season back in 2005, when I was, for several weeks, visiting at the University of Newcastle. Among its many remarkable non achievements, the astronomers headed by their rough and hard drinking female boss believed they had found God in their data. After much checking, rechecking and discussing, they all wrote a paper on their discovery and then submitted it on line to the most high impact Astronomy journal they could think of. They did so by all of them putting their thumbs on top of each other, on the “Return” key of the computer keyboard and then pressing down together. They smiled and laughed and celebrated. Then it turned out that their “God” signals had been coming off a faulty microwave, or something like that.

        I know something about how that feels: I’ve been there, more or less, only on far less high-profile matters. Many of my colleagues have. That’s one reason I liked the show.

        And, sadly, that was the last episode I got to see before the end of my visit.

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      • #2321089
        anonymous
        Guest

        I’d like to see ‘the matrix’ franchise of films made into a TV series
        hang on, we’re actually living it, on our computers 🙂

        • #2321094
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          hang on, we’re actually living it, on our computers

          That makes me wonder if the Matrix could afford to let the current number of “energy producers” die off, or if they would even want to.

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      • #2321093
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        the matrix

        You’ll get ‘The Matrix 4‘ next year

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        • #2321117
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Well, something to look forward to while waiting for Tom Cruise to come back, in the next “Mission Impossible” movie, and save the world. Again.

          And according to the video in the IMDB Web page, Keanu Reeves has not aged a single day since the original “Matrix”, 21 years ago!

          That is some serious science fiction!

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      • #2322070
        AmbularD
        AskWoody Plus

        At least it was fun in a goofy sort of way, unpretentious, obviously low budget and using technology in their (presumably, with enough suspension of disbelief) super duper, tremendously advanced battle starships that was NOT mid-Twentieth Century, such as retro land-line chunky phones with rotary dials and wall clocks “to confuse the enemy” (and to save money on props?), according to the second version fans.

        The retro tech wasn’t meant to confuse the Cylons.  It was meant to prevent them from propagating malware across networked systems, which was how they quickly disabled and destroyed every other battlestar except the Pegasus as well as a majority of the fleet’s cutting-edge Vipers.  Poor Adama was a bit of a Luddite, for sure, and the rest of the fleet shared your skepticism, but they found out the hard way that old reliable tech still has its uses, and occasionally it may even save you.

        I’m very fond of Firefly, so at least we have that in common.  If I had to pick the best Sci-Fi series, though, I think I might have to agree with the Babylon 5 contingent, though ST:TNG and Stargate:SG1 are also strong contenders.

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        • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by AmbularD.
      • #2323392
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        AmbularD: “I’m very fond of Firefly, so at least we have that in common.  If I had to pick the best Sci-Fi series, though, I think I might have to agree with the Babylon 5 contingent, though ST:TNG and Stargate:SG1 are also strong contenders.

        So do I with each one of those, as do more than who has commented one here. They were all landmarks among science fiction shows, and had some episodes that really made one think. Which is what the best science fiction, whether onscreen or on the pages of a book, is also for.

        I would add to my own list of those shows I’ve had already commented on here one that I believe qualifies as science fiction, an animated one in a unique style both of story telling and drawing:”Samurai Jack”, created by the most talented Genndy Tartakovsky for Cartoon Network and Adult Swim and also the winner of many awards:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samurai_Jack

        A trailer, to give an idea of the style and action:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvF2c5Xh_bghttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvF2c5Xh_bg

         

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      • #2333478
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here are two oldies that I liked watching when they first came out (the second one in particular) and would like to remind of them to those who have seen them and to make aware of them to those who have not:

        (1) Armageddon (1998)

        According to Wikipedia:

        The film follows a group of blue-collar deep-core drillers sent by NASA to stop a gigantic asteroid on a collision course with Earth.

        It starred Bruce Willis and an ensemble cast with, among others, Ben Affleck, Billy Bob Thornton and Owen Wilson.

        (2) Space Cowboys

        Wikipedia, again:

        Space Cowboys is a 2000 American adventure drama film directed and produced by Clint Eastwood. It stars Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, Donal Sutherland, and James Gardner as four older “ex-test pilots” who are sent into space to repair an old Soviet satellite.

        The problem with that satellite, a Cold War relic, was that it was armed with several nuclear warheads independently targeted to US installations and cities and those of its allies. It was believed to have been inactivated, but it had come back to life suddenly, because it had been programmed to do that once its orbit had decayed due to air friction down to a certain lower height, from where it would start launching its nukes toward their designated targets. A team was quickly put together to go to the satellite and take control of it, consisting in part of veteran and now retired NASA space engineers that also had been, earlier on, test pilots, some of them familiar with some of the hardware, because they had designed it and later had been stolen from NASA by Soviet spies; the team included also some young astronauts.

        Good luck watching, if you can find them on some streaming service or can get the DVDs. If you do, please let me know here where you found them.

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        • This reply was modified 3 months, 4 weeks ago by OscarCP.
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        • #2333516
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          Thaks for reminding Space Cowboys. I like that movie – I think they were real man, honest and brave and that movie is little bit funny too, I understand that movie very positively.

          Have you ever seen old czech sci-fi Adela Has Not Had Supper Yet?

          Adela Has Not Had Supper Yet (1978) – IMDb

          Its a classical czech movie about american detective Nick Carter, worlds most famous detective, that comes to Prague to solve big mystery missing family member. It shows, that the villain is actually very sophisticated and the movie escalates then. I think you could actually like it, it has all modern movie has. But I dont know if its available with dubbing or subtitles. May be worth searching for.

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        • #2335250
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          and there should be something very close to Space Cowboys..
          Ad Astra (2019) – “Astronaut Roy McBride undertakes a mission across an unforgiving solar system to uncover the truth about his missing father and his doomed expedition that now, 30 years later, threatens the universe.” – IMDb

          There are also same actors 🙂

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      • #2334641
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Two oldie TV miniseries, horror with some science-fictional themes, that I remember watching with fascination were “The Tommyknockers” (1993) based on a Stephen King novel and “The Langoliers” (1995), based on a short novel, or novella, of his:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tommyknockers_(miniseries)

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Langoliers_(miniseries).

        Both are available now on DVD.

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      • #2335415
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Kolchak: The Night Stalker
        This was a brief, Grade B television series, but it’s droll. Kolchak, a newspaper reporter in a bad suit and worse hat, meets weird monsters.

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        • #2336078
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          geekdom: There were to series by the name of “Kolchak, The Night Stalker” and I don’t know if you may be referring to the first one made in the mid-70’s, that lasted just one season, but according to Wikipedia, “it rapidly achieved cult status and has remained very popular in syndication” and also had “tremendous influence” on the creators of the “X-files”; or to the second one in 2005, made to capitalize on the success of the “X-Files” and was canceled after a few episodes. I remember seeing what was probably the second series and being intrigued enough to watch it for as long as it lasted, that as I have already mentioned, was not a whole lot.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kolchak:_The_Night_Stalker

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          • #2336270
            geekdom
            AskWoody Plus

            1970’s Kolchak version; dry humor saves the day. Never saw any of the second series.

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      • #2337264
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I just checked and it looks like Netflix’s “3 Below” has not been mentioned here so far. It is the middle series of the (to my taste) terrific animation trilogy “Tales of Arcadia” created by Guillermo del Toro (of whom I am a big fan), that combines magic, slapstick comedy and science fiction, the later being particularly emphasized in this middle series. This series has only a light connection with the rest of the trilogy and can be watched by itself.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3Below%3A_Tales_of_Arcadia

        This a trailer showing mostly the end part of the first episode :

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4m2hFy3Ggg

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      • #2338211
        RebusCom
        AskWoody Plus

        For any of you that have somehow managed to put off watching the Babylon 5 series, or wish to rewind a classic, see https://www.inverse.com/entertainment/best-scifi-hbo-max-babylon-5

         

        • #2338224
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          In case anyone is interested: Amazon Prime also has it available for streaming, but at $3 per episode or $30 per season, for a total of $150 for all five seasons. People that want to get some idea of what this show is like could buy one or two episodes (but better skip the Pilot, as some of the characters introduced there are replaced by others in the rest o the series) Some might calculate they are better off buying the whole series this way rather than subscribing to HBO, although I am not sure that it would be a such a good deal for most. (For my part I have the DVDs that I bought not long after the end of this show.) Those who subscribe to Amazon Prime can stream “The Expanse” at no extra charge.

          In a way, I see these two shows as the metaphorical book-ends of the shelf of serious, high-production-values (for the time when they were made) science fiction shows of the last thirty years. (“The Next Generation” was earlier than that.) The reason I see Babylon 5 as particularly interesting is the dry humor in the middle of all the drama, how it balances its dark moments with lighter ones while keeping the story intriguing enough to make one want to keep watching to see what happens next.

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      • #2338276
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        ‘Back to the Future’ DeLorean turned 40 on Jan, 21 2021.
        The car maybe back.

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      • #2348437
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I just have watched a 2007 movie that Alex brought to my attention for the first time here #2306170 : “The Man from Earth”, with a script written by Jerome Bixby (that among many things wrote the script for the Star Trek episode “Requiem from Methuselah.” ) He did write the script over a lapse of almost forty years since he first thought of it and completed it in 1998, at age 75, already in his deathbed, dictating the last part to his son, who, in turn was a producer of the movie. I added a comment following  Alex’s, with excerpts from this Wikipedia article:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_from_Earth

        The movie is about a conversation during the farewell party for a man, who seems to be in his late thirties or early forties, that is leaving town after resigning a University position there for reasons he at first does not want to explain. The audience is a group of university colleagues and the young student of one of them. The man, who is the protagonist of the movie, tells them, reluctantly at first, that he has been around for 14,000 years. What follows this hard to believe revelation is a discussion that ranges widely over various scientific disciplines as well as religion and philosophy. It is, for this reason, a most unusual plot for a movie, but one that hangs together beautifully, is also well acted, and has left me with a deep impression.

        For example, at some point there is a perhaps two-minute long exchange on the nature of time. It goes more or less like this: the alleged 14,000 year old man states, in reply to someone else’s comment on what time might mean to an immortal, that time is not real. Someone says that it exists, because it is measured with clocks. He counters that clocks are measured against other clocks and time is an abstract concept convenient to use for making sense of things, but not a part of reality. And this is not some clever evasive flourish, but a deep concept from relational quantum physics, something I would had never expected to find in a science fiction movie! And much of what is said in this movie, as far as I could follow it, is at this level, but always expressed in a simple, direct and unpretentious way.

        This is