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  • This should be the best patching experience

    Home Forums AskWoody blog This should be the best patching experience

    • This topic has 17 replies, 9 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago.
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      • #2336559
        Susan Bradley
        Manager

        So many of you know that I have several computing devices.  My favorite desktop computers are HP’s with SSD drivers (mind you with new style SSD drive
        [See the full post at: This should be the best patching experience]

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      • #2336610
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        So, Microsoft, I’m giving you another shot.

        I wonder. Aren’t 9 years of giving a second, third, fourth… chance, failed Surface sales (2-3M a year!), poor hardware, CPU stuck a 800mhz and not fixed for 2+ years, bulging batteries/screens, Surface being the last in the line for updates….enough ?

      • #2336659
        HarryH3
        AskWoody Lounger

        They just got your money, again.  Why would they change anything?  🙁

        Let’s face it, Microsoft is not a real hardware maker.  They write code.  The Surface is just a high margin toy for them.

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by HarryH3.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2336664
        Cousinjack
        AskWoody Lounger

        Should of followed Woody’s advice and got a Chromebook 🙂

        • #2336704
          Susan Bradley
          Manager

          I work in Windows.  Chromebook wouldn’t work.  I need to remote into computers, get to Office documents.  If all you are doing is reading email and social media, yes.  But if you have to work, it’s Windows.  Even now.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        • #2336720
          anonymous
          Guest

          No, please No.  Chromebooks are awful except in one regard.  As a disposable device, far, far less money goes down the drain when they quit.

          I don’t get the surface cult at all, there are plenty of legitimate laptops that are much better devices.  Some weird buy by the label thing, maybe?  At least chromebooks are recognized as barely sufficient for one’s needs, and there’s no fan fiefdom.

      • #2336641
        anonymous
        Guest

        I’ve got a surface pro 4 sitting here that was given to me.  Even being free I find it nearly useless.  I play with it from time to time, but ultimately grab a real laptop when I’m going to do anything real.

        Its high gloss display makes glare a huge issue, and unlike a smartphone or small tablet that one instinctively tilts easily and automatically to avoid glare, is a pain to continuously reposition.  And with one whole USB port, it is incredibly hamstrung.  The mouse is cool, but nearly useless since the responsiveness of the touch panel simulating a mouse wheel feels laggy and disconnected.  Use a good mouse and there goes the one USB port.  With no Ethernet port you’re stuck with wireless unless you carry a USB Ethernet adapter.  But you can’t use that if you’re using your USB mouse.  The flip keyboard is an interesting design element.  How such a flimsy keyboard can cost over $100 is a real mystery.  Toss in being unrepairable and non-upgradable despite the fact it costs a bloody fortune and I’m at a loss to find the appeal.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2336661
        anonymous
        Guest

        Thank you Susan for sharing your favorite desktop, laptop, and travel laptop! One of my laptops stopped working recently, so I had to play musical chair with my devices, which included switching my personal “go-to” laptop (a VAIO just before Sony sold the business) to be used as the family streaming laptop, leaving myself on the lookout for another laptop. I will definitely look into the Lenovo laptop you mentioned. I was also wondering if you can maybe share some more recommendations for durable, low maintenance laptops? Thank you in advance.

      • #2336697
        GKnola
        AskWoody Plus

        I wouldn’t take an SP as  present, let alone buy one. I bought an SP3 on day 1. What a mistake. When I needed a larger HDD, there was no one who would do the upgrade, not even M$. For the first time since my original 286 I didn’t attempt to do it because everyone said that it was almost impossible to remove the display to get at the internal components with out breaking it

        The I7 ran so hot that the display finally separated from the frame but by then I’d relegated it to the role of a spare desktop that ran a couple of minor apps.

        The keyboard was a piece of c*** which I replaced with an SP4 keyboard when they came our and the same with the docking station.

        The kickstand was all but useless on an airplane unless you found a magazine to put on the tray table to make the area large enough for the computer and keyboard.

        What did I like? The screen clarity, the size and weight.

        Do I now have the ‘perfect’ notebook? Nope – I don’t know that there is such a thing for me, but I’m a lot happier with my Lenovo C-930 Yoga even though it’s bulkier and heavier.

        You remind me of Charlie Brown trying to kick the football that Lucy keeps pulling away. You know it’s going too happen but you still keep trying.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2336744
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I work in Windows.  Chromebook wouldn’t work.  I need to remote into computers, get to Office documents.  If all you are doing is reading email and social media, yes.  But if you have to work, it’s Windows.  Even now.

        You can remote with Google remote, have access to Office documents, get access to Office software…
        all on Chromebooks for 1/2 of the price.

        • #2336810
          anonymous
          Guest

          I was just about to post something like this and you beat me to it.  I remote into my Windows 10 PC everyday from the comfort of my living room and a $125 Acer Chromebook.  Works like a champ.

          • #2336812
            Susan Bradley
            Manager

            I have personally tried it and I remote into Servers, network switches, etc etc.  There are a lot of things you can’t get into from a Chromebook.

            Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      • #2336777
        SteveTree
        AskWoody Lounger

        Surface was on my list years ago. Fortunately I waited for reviews. The deal killer came with news if the updates Issues I expected Microsoft could not possibly fail at with Surface. Logically, you’d think they test their own hardware beyond reasonable expectations so they didn’t generate a bad reputation.  it seems they went out of their way not to favour their own product instead.

        Group A (but Telemetry disabled Tasks and Registry)
        Win 7 64 Pro desktop
        Win 10 64 Home portable

      • #2336927
        kdock
        AskWoody Plus

        Susan,
        Surface issues aside, I’m curious what you mean by “mind you with new style SSD drives now days”.

        Thanks!  Kim

      • #2336910
        anonymous
        Guest

        I have never properly understood the purpose of the Microsoft Surface lineup. Neither could I understand the purpose of the retail Microsoft Stores. It all seemed to be an attempt to copy Apple at their game, without making any effort to improve on the formula, and after years of mocking Apple for their business practices.

        I can see some value in Microsoft offering “premium” devices at a premium price, but they need to actually deliver on a lot of things in order for such a lineup to be feasible. Expectations will be high if one company is having near-complete vertical control over a product, from its hardware design to its software, and if it fails on either end, the product will fail expectations. We’ve seen plenty of reports of Surface devices with bad hardware, and humorous reports of Surface devices suffering the same Windows Update issues that non-Surface devices have. I’m no fan of Windows Update, but if I get basically the same experience on Microsoft’s own hardware than I do with another computer manufacturer, that really shakes a lot of confidence in Microsoft’s attempts at making their parts work together, the way Apple can do it.

        Then too is the aspect of customer support. Apple Stores don’t just sell devices, but also coordinate repairs and customer support as well. If your Apple device breaks or needs repairs, you can bring it into an Apple Store for them to inspect, and they can repair it on-site or send it off to the factory as needed, and they’ll give you the price before you decide to have to pay. This is faster and often safer than mailing it in, since you get the price right away rather than being hit with a big repair bill (or getting it sent back as “can’t fix” or “won’t fix”). Microsoft tried to copy this with the Microsoft Store, which was nothing more than just a reskinned Apple Store for selling Microsoft’s hardware. Microsoft just never paid much attention to their Microsoft Store lineup as it’s not their primary mode of making money (Apple, on the other hand, for historical reasons, relies heavily on their retail store model), and with the COVID-19 pandemic, Microsoft has shuttered most of its retail stores, meaning that Surface customers can no longer get fast and easy service of their devices (assuming that customer support was ever as good as Apple’s; I’ve heard plenty of reports of Surface owners being charged exorbitant fees to repair product defects).

        I’m not opposed to Microsoft working on their Surface lineup. I think Apple does need stiff competition, otherwise they’ll stagnate. But when Apple does something, it’s “go big or go home”. Microsoft has been sticking their foot through the door but not actually stepping into the room. If they want Surface to take off, they need to step all the way in, otherwise the door will close on their leg and it will hurt. Right now they’re a laughing stock amongst Apple users for being a terrible copycat at what Apple succeeds at. If Microsoft truly wants to deliver to Windows users the premium experience Apple offers, then they need to “go big” or “go home”.

      • #2336989
        Still Anonymous
        AskWoody Lounger

        Let’s face it, Microsoft is not a real hardware maker. They write code. The Surface is just a high margin toy for them.

        That may be true, but I think that Surface is more of a prototype, of where they want to go and what they want other manufacturers to emulate.  Not unlike what Google is doing with Pixel, although Google seems to have more commitment to supporting their stuff.

        I don’t know for sure, but I suspect that the primary responsibility for Surface belongs to the Marketing people.  Thus, ongoing support of users is a high cost, low revenue proposition, Surface users get low priority.  There’s not really much incentive to support machines, once they’re sold

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