News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Time for a new router

    • This topic has 14 replies, 6 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago.
    Viewing 8 reply threads
    • Author
      Posts
      • #2284353 Reply
        Cijan
        AskWoody Plus

        After an inadvertent loss of power, my old dlink dir 655 lost it’s ability to connect to the internet.

        I’ve spent a few hours trying to figure out what’s gone wrong – there have been power interruptions before and it’s always gracefully re-started without losing it’s connection to internet, or any of the settings, including wifi. I’m not sure whether I can get it going again so am relying for now on my ISP modem/router for security (and AV of course).

        I thought about trying to use the knowledge here to get the old one going, but it’s probably not worth it. I know the router isn’t fried, because I was able to get to and see settings. I’ve tried orderly shut-downs and power-ups of the ISP modem and my router, but no joy.

        Meanwhile, I’m investigating new routers… and know what features I should look for. I read through some other posts here where links were provided to a site that gives vulnerability info on routers (https://nvd.nist.gov/vuln), which I’d like to make use of when buying a new one, but how do I know if the vulnerability has already been fixed by the manufacturer? Is there info on that? Do you trust manufacturer’s sites?

        If you see routers on clearance and they are a couple of years past when they were rolled out, should they be avoided?

        A couple I’ve seen are the DLINK 878 AC 1900 MU-MIMO, and the ASUS RT-AC869 AC2900. Both appear on the previously mentioned site, but I don’t see how to tell if the vuln is fixed.
        Any thoughts on those routers?

        Typical home use – a couple of older Windows 10 PCs and newer Android smartphones, no gaming, not much streaming, a couple of WIFI/smart TVs. I want solid performance, no cloud interface, 802.11ac WIFI, excellent security, and for a larger sized home.

        Suggestions???

      • #2284363 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        There is a reset on most Routers that resets them to factory defaults.
        Log into the router and go through and record all of your settings.
        The reset is a small hole (like the one on a DVD player to release the tray). It is best accessed with a straightened paperclip. hold it in for 30 seconds (with the router plugged in) then redo the settings and see if it will work.

        • #2284366 Reply
          Cijan
          AskWoody Plus

          Well, I’m not sure that will work. When I was trying to get it going, I thought I’d try the ‘internet connection wizard’ to see if I could get it going. One issue is that you have to go through the time/date setup. It had been set to get time via a dns time server, but that required internet connection. OR, you copy time from the computer. Well, that seems to be a problem too, because it won’t recognize ‘2020’. It picks up the month/day/time, but not the year. The year can be entered by a drop down that stops at 2019. Foiled yet again! I suspect resetting to factory defaults would show the same problem. I guess they never figured it would still be alive and working in 2020!

      • #2284367 Reply
        Kirsty
        Da Boss

        From routersecurity.org:

        In October 2019 we learned of 10 D-Link routers with critical flaws that will not be fixed. If you have any of these D-Link routers, don’t bother testing, just get a new router: DIR-655, DIR-866L, DIR-652, DHP-1565, DIR-855L, DAP-1533, DIR-862L, DIR-615, DIR-835 and the DIR-825. For confirmation, CERT has a Proof of Concept web page that will disconnect a vulnerable D-Link router from the Internet for a minute.

        Looking for a replacement seems to be your best bet!

        • #2284370 Reply
          Cijan
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks – i had seen that site and the same article. Everytime I think I’ve found a suitable router model, it either has vulnerabilities or there are none available ;0!

      • #2284402 Reply
        NetDef
        AskWoody_MVP

        If you have a larger home, you might want to check out https://store.amplifi.com/products/amplifi-mesh-wi-fi-system for a distributed solution.

        It can be managed locally only, or via a cloud account – so choices.

        ~ Group "Weekend" ~

      • #2284404 Reply
        scooby
        AskWoody Plus

        I have a Synology rt2600ac. It is thoroughly critiqued on routersecuritydotorg.

        The June 2020 firmware update was the first in 8 months, so there was speculation in the user forum that Synology had abandoned  this model. That’s too long a gap between firmware updates.

        Here is a third reason for me to replace it: it is top rated at Consumer Reports :).

        Has anyone had experience with either of  the Gryphon routers?

        • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by scooby.
      • #2284513 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I always want a guest wifi connection for those pesky IoT devices, including TVs. ASUS models usually have that a standard.

        You will almost always find routers “fall out” of support and fixes so being vigilant is your best defence.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2284637 Reply
        Cijan
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks everyone for the article links and router suggestions. I’m not looking for a high-end router with a ton of features. Much as the Pepwave sounds perfect (although lacking USB port and a touch expensive thanks to shipping), they’re out of stock both at the local distributor and on their own website, none to be expected for a couple of weeks.

        In reading through the reviews on routersecurity.org – it would appear that he considers the ASUS brand better than the other (well known) consumer brands, especially in the manufacturer addressing/fixing bugs, so I think I’ll narrow my search to them.

        I went to my local tech shop, but got a youngster that doesn’t think router security is important, and that only businesses with something to lose are targets, the rest of us aren’t. When I asked if he knew how long the 3 routers he suggested would receive firmware updates/patches and what their lifespan is he likened them to the diff between chef’s knives and cheap knives. Huh??? I ‘think’ he was suggesting you get what you pay for, but a knife doesn’t become obsolete unless you abuse it, nor does it need updates!!!

        So – anyone have strong dislikes of ASUS?
        The local youngster pulled up the RT-AX56U AX1800 Dual=Band Wifi 802.11ax wireless router – anyone have any experience with it?

      • #2284685 Reply
        Cijan
        AskWoody Plus

        I’ve gone and ordered a simpler, cheaper model (ASUS RT AC1200) that does appear to have frequent firmware updates (latest was a month ago).

        It has simple features, no traffic analyzer or Trends Micro stuff (as warned in the routersecurity.org site and other security/privacy articles). No cloud or mobile app required, straight up web browser/IP set up.

        It is an older model, but should do the job for now. At least it buys me time for further investigation without the time crunch of being router-less.

        I’ll follow the newsletter articles about router setup, along with the security recommendations under routersecurity.org.
        Thanks all.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2284732 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I can’t see why that router would be short term. It’s a step up from the ISP supplied units that most people run for years.

        cheers, Paul

        • #2285384 Reply
          Cijan
          AskWoody Plus

          True, it will do the main job (hopefully!) of security beyond what ISP provided. I just found it overwhelming – all the many brands, features and things to steer clear of. But, if we end up with more iOT devices, or don’t get great coverage, it might be worth more research into a higher-grade router.

          • #2285498 Reply
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            Coverage can be improved by the addition of an extender or another router acting as an Access Point.

            cheers, Paul

    Viewing 8 reply threads

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Time for a new router

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.