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  • trying to turn off Windows 10 Home updates

    Posted on BlueIris Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 trying to turn off Windows 10 Home updates

    This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by

     Alex5723 3 weeks, 3 days ago.

    • Author
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    • #341955 Reply

      BlueIris
      AskWoody Lounger

      I am a former applications programmer, so not an operating systems person.  However, I had figured out how to turn off the Windows 10 Home updates and would turn them back on periodically when I had the time to deal with fallout from them.  This was reinforced by tremendous problems when the April 2018 updates were installed — it took me until January 2019 to resolve them completely.  Recently, it seems that my methods aren’t working as well as before — at least two updates have slipped through with the latest being 2019-03 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809 for x64-based Systems (KB4489899).

      Currently, I have Windows Update in Component Services switched to “Disabled” — although when I checked on it after that last update, somehow it had been switched to Manual and was running.

      I also have deleted tasks associated with Automatic App Update, Reboot, ScanForUpdates Scheduled Start with Network, Scheduled Start, and UpdateAssistant in the Task Scheduler.

      What am I missing, such that I’ve gotten two updates lately?

    • #341962 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      The only thing Home has built in is setting the Internet connection to Metered and using wushowhide.diagcab (download from Microsoft) to hide updates.

      Another solution, pay the $100 for Win10 Pro upgrade – there are some controls there.

      Another solution is third-party programs that stop Windows Update such as WuMgr and O&O Shutup 10

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #342055 Reply

        Bluetrix
        AskWoody MVP

        I agree with @pkcano on O&O. @microfix introduced me to O&OShutup, works as advertised. Also shuts off the majority of telemetry if you decide to do that.

        In one huge way it’s better than sending M$ another $100 for the privilege of just delaying an update. With O&O you choose when and if Windows will update.

        Windows10 Home 1809 | Mint19 on VM

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #345518 Reply

      BlueIris
      AskWoody Lounger

      Since I was mad as heck after I posted that, I went searching.  In the Component Services, I found Windows 10 Update Facilitation Service and didn’t like its name.  I tried to Stop it and switch it to disabled, but it wouldn’t let me.  I then Googled it and found this:  https://www.askwoody.com/2018/watch-out-win10-update-facilitation-as-a-service-and-a-new-push-for-the-update-assistant/

      I then Googled something like “how can I turn off Windows 10 Update Facilitation Service” and found:  https://www.wintips.org/how-to-turn-off-windows-10-updates-permanently/

      I did that and it worked as described!  When I’m ready for updates, all I have to do is rename the file back.  I filed your O&O software suggestion because it also has some other nice features.  Thanks!

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #345525 Reply

        Bluetrix
        AskWoody MVP

        all I have to do is rename the file back

        A suggestion: Using the change name option may work well for your needs. Open Notepad and write what you changed and when you changed it. Name this Note whatever will spark your recollection for future reference. Stick it in your Documents folder.

        The faintest ink is better than the best memory. (I stole that phrase)

        Windows10 Home 1809 | Mint19 on VM

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #345563 Reply

          BlueIris
          AskWoody Lounger

          I keyed a reply, but forgot to log in, so it’s “awaiting moderation” and will appear as “Anonymous”.  🙂

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #345561 Reply

          anonymous

          I have pages and pages of documentation of how I set up each of my computers — I’m very picky about settings in Word, Excel, etc., how I want icons set up, etc.  So, yes, I added this to my documentation for that computer (my others are Windows 7).  I used to do documentation on the programs I worked on, so it’s almost second nature.  🙂

    • #345596 Reply

      anonymous

      Take ownership of update exe’s and deny access to all but admin. However Win10 will ignore this sometimes, had it happen, then destroy update orchestrar files in scheduler folder with taking ownership and delete.

      Update with iso when new stable version released.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1083680 Reply

        BlueIris
        AskWoody Lounger

        I keyed a reply, but forgot to log in, so it’s “awaiting moderation” and will appear as “Anonymous”.  🙂

      • #1083582 Reply

        anonymous

        Basically, that’s what the link in my 3/26 post did — I think it was winaueng? — and it did work as noted in the link.  The Windows Update did say something like invalid or whatever the link said it would.  So, I was thrilled! — for about 3 days.  Then it started up again.  At this point, I’ve simply been checking it every time I turn on the computer and about every other time or so, it’s on Manual and not Disabled and I switch it back to Disabled.  I did find another program that sounded promising — winupdmgr or something like that — and was going to try altering that one when I have time in a few weeks.  The problem is finding the programs because sometimes names don’t always reflect the program’s purpose.  Also, I like the sound of Bundaburra’s suggestion below and might try that.

    • #1079856 Reply

      Bundaburra
      AskWoody Lounger

      There’s a nifty little free Windows Update blocker (wub.exe) which can be used to disable or enable the Windows Update service.  The service can be disabled and protected from something else re-enabling it.  Can be invoked from an administrative command prompt, or via a batch file.  The commands are wub /E  to enable, and wub /D /P to disable and protect.  It works on Windows 10 Home.

      Can also be used for other services.  Get it from https://www.sordum.org/9470/windows-update-blocker-v1-2/

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1083816 Reply

        BlueIris
        AskWoody Lounger

        Ooooh!  I like the sound of that — simple, easy, and free!  I just might give that a try in a couple of weeks when I have time.

        As I detailed in my response to Anonymous above (but forgot to sign in first, so it will appear as Anonymous as well), what I detailed in my 3/26 post only worked for a short while, so I’m just constantly checking to see if it’s been turned on or not and switching it to Disabled if it’s on.

    • #1087175 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Ooooh! I like the sound of that — simple, easy, and free! I just might give that a try in a couple of weeks when I have time.

      As I detailed in my response to Anonymous above (but forgot to sign in first, so it will appear as Anonymous as well), what I detailed in my 3/26 post only worked for a short while, so I’m just constantly checking to see if it’s been turned on or not and switching it to Disabled if it’s on.

      Look for Sledgehammer (formerly WUMT Wrapper Script) at https://www.ghacks.net/2019/04/28/control-windows-updates-with-sledgehammer-formerly-wumt-wrapper-script/

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