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  • Unable to install September 2017 Quality Rollup due to "Code 800700C1" situation

    Posted on ZemplinTemplar Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 7 Questions: Windows 7 Unable to install September 2017 Quality Rollup due to "Code 800700C1" situation

    Topic Resolution: Not Resolved

    This topic contains 52 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  GoneToPlaid 1 week, 4 days ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #135135 Reply

      ZemplinTemplar
      AskWoody Lounger

      Since at least late August, I have been unable to update my Win 7 Professional 32-bit desktop with the latest Monthly Quality Rollups.

      After my attempts failed again and again – with all attempts noted as having failed due to “800700C1” – I tried sidestepping this issue with installing the monthly security only patches instead. Did not help either. The June SO update went through the motions, but Windows Update still reported it hadn’t installed properly and the issue was once again with “800700C1”. Mind you, both the August and September Rollup patches and the SO patch for June I tried installing, were all x86 (for 32-bit). So it’s not me mismatching updates with my system.

      What could be wrong with this ? Is some file corrupt on my system and blocking an update install ? In another discussion where I highlighted my current predicament, some people suggested it might be one of the possible causes. I’m not sure, though. Here’s a screenshot I already posted in that discussion, showing the installation error message I keep getting:

      Win 7 32-bit WU update install error issue, Code 800700C1

      Any troubleshooting suggestions on how to get installs going again ? At least for the main monthly patch, that’s all I really need for now.

      I’m worried about slipping in the update schedule by entire months, but things are made worse by the fact that I currently can’t afford a new Windows 7 install, at all. I just want to install my security patches ASAP, and be at peace until the next round.

      Thanks in advance for any advice.

      P.S. Be gentle, I am still rather new to these forums.

      • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  ZemplinTemplar.
      • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  Kirsty.
    • #135283 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      I would suggest to do the steps in section “How to Use SFC /Scannow” of How to Use SFC /Scannow to Repair Windows System Files.

      If you do this, let me know if it reported errors or not.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #136757 Reply

      ZemplinTemplar
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hello, Mr. Brian.

      As the forums have been acting up lately, I was actually convinced this particular topic didn’t even get posted properly. I’m glad to see it’s here, now that I’ve come back a week later.

      Back on the 4th, I actually used scannow, then generated a readable version of the CBS.Log file, i.e. sfcdetails. I’m including it in the attachment, hopefully you and the others will be able to offer some more advice then. Thank you.

      Attachments:
      You must be logged in to view attached files.
    • #136819 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      It seems that there are some corrupted files amongst the files sfc checks. Could you run sfc /scannow again and post the new results?

    • #136836 Reply

      ZemplinTemplar
      AskWoody Lounger

      Sure thing. I’ll post the current results in a few hours.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #137131 Reply

      ZemplinTemplar
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve generated the sfcdetails.txt file just as before, but I’m having problems with adding it as an attachment. As a workaround, here’s an alternate download, it should work: http://www.mediafire.com/file/t28j8syvhmwyu16/sfcdetails.txt Hopefully you’ll be able to download it without issues.

    • #137141 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      I downloaded it successfully. It shows there are still some corrupted files.

      I would suggest to:

      1. Open an elevated command prompt.

      2. In the elevated command prompt, type this command and then press Enter key:

      DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /Scanhealth

      In case you’re wondering why we’re doing this, here is a reference.

      • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  MrBrian.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #140963 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        Well, I’ve downloaded, installed and ran CheckSur, and the final CheckSUR.log it gave me does point to at least one error. You’ll probably be able to make heads and tails of it better than me.

        There’s some issue again with attachments (not wanting to upload .txt or .log files), so I’m forced to resort to external hosting again: http://www.mediafire.com/file/b3mpqx4j2pfaiv8/CheckSUR.log

        Thanks in advance for any further advice and help.

         

        • #140964 Reply

          ZemplinTemplar
          AskWoody Lounger

          Oops. This post was meant to go under my 1:42 AM post. Sorry.

          The post above follows the 1:42 AM post (since I was only getting ready to try CheckSUR at that point).

           

      • #140967 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’ve also used the DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /Scanhealth method, via Cmd-as-admin. Here are the results: http://www.mediafire.com/file/qarbmy52594r91c/CheckSUR_via_DISM_%2827th_Oct_2017%29.log Having read both iterations of the CheckSUR log, it seems both solutions found the exact same error.

    • #140959 Reply

      ZemplinTemplar
      AskWoody Lounger

      Sorry I’ve been quiet for the last two weeks, but I was busy in my professional and family life. That said, I still want to get this annoying WU issue resolved soon. No progress in those last two weeks, but I didn’t attempt any.

      I’d like to thank you for the CheckSUR recommendation, you’re not the first to bring it up as a possible solution. I’ve already downloaded CheckSUR, per your recommendation (from here) and I’m going to give it a go.

      Has it proven genuinely helpful for seeking out remaining errors ? I hope so.

      I know I sound quite sheepish, but given that I’ve grown very cautious about Windows Update installs themselves, I’m also rather cautious when it comes to diagnostic tools like CheckSUR. Not that I don’t think it won’t work, I’m just hoping it doesn’t have bugs or oversights of its own. As I’m using the x86/32-bit W7, it seems the latest version of CheckSUR I can download and install is an October 2014 version. The install is some 228 MB big.

    • #140976 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      Your logs seem to show that file smipi.dll is corrupt on your system. Servicing stack update KB3177467 contains this file. Step 5 of https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/10164/fix-windows-update-errors recommends to install this update. Please try “Method 2” at the first link to manually install the “All supported x86-based versions of Windows 7” version of this update, if it’s not already installed.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #141012 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thank you ! 🙂

        Will KB3177467 be reversible via a W7 restore point, on the off chance anything would get messed up during the installation process or after ? (I already have restore points for today and I’ll make a new one if needed, so no biggie.)

        And do I need to install any other update outside of KB3177467 ?

        • #141023 Reply

          PKCano
          AskWoody MVP

          Yes, KB3177467 needs to be installed by itself stand-alone.
          Any others have to be installed before or after, and not be in the important updates queue.

          • #141029 Reply

            ZemplinTemplar
            AskWoody Lounger

            I’ve downloaded KB3177467, so I presume it’s an ordinary manual install that won’t be needing any help from the regular WU installation interface.

            Any others have to be installed before or after, and not be in the important updates queue.

            I find this a bit confusingly worded. Currently, I can probably only install a limited amount of Windows updates, precisely because of the issue with smipi.dll. So, even if I wanted to, I currently cannot install the likes of the October Rollup patch (not that I want to straight away, but you get the idea) before I resolve the 800700C1 error with the KB3177467 stack update. So, at least in that case, there is no “before”, as it’s not working. Yet.

            • #141031 Reply

              PKCano
              AskWoody MVP

              That statement doesn’t apply to a manual update. Only if you are installing through WU. Sorry for the confusion.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #141033 Reply

              ZemplinTemplar
              AskWoody Lounger

              Okay. Thought so. 🙂

            • #141044 Reply

              Bob99
              AskWoody Lounger

              To answer your other question from your post above “Will KB3177467 be reversible via a W7 restore point, on the off chance anything would get messed up during the installation process or after?” the answer is that the process of installing the update will create a restore point of it’s own automatically. After you double click on the installation package you downloaded, the window that comes up will show the progress the installer makes, including the creation of a restore point.

              At least that’s what has always happened with me when I’ve had to do stand-alone installations of Windows updates. So, you should be all set.

        • #141099 Reply

          MrBrian
          AskWoody MVP

          “And do I need to install any other update outside of KB3177467 ?”

          You’re welcome :).

          Just KB3177467 for now. If it won’t install because it was installed in the past, then there are other things we can try.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #141106 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      The other thing I recommend to do to fix the corrupted smipi.dll file is:

      1. Download (using Method 2) version “All supported x86-based versions of Windows 7” of update KB3020369.

      2. Copy file downloaded in step 1 to folder c:\windows\CheckSUR\packages. Create this folder first if it doesn’t exist.

      3. Open an elevated command prompt.

      4. In the elevated command prompt, type this command and then press Enter key:

      DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /Scanhealth

      5. Post file checksur.log somewhere where I can view it.

      P.S. Installing KB3177467 installs a newer version of smipi.dll and newer versions of some other files, but won’t fix the corrupted smipi.dll. If you’re wary of installing KB3177467, you can skip installing it for now.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • #141214 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        The other thing I recommend to do to fix the corrupted smipi.dll file is:

        1. Download (using Method 2) version “All supported x86-based versions of Windows 7” of update KB3020369.

        2. Copy file downloaded in step 1 to folder c:\windows\CheckSUR\packages. Create this folder first if it doesn’t exist.

        3. Open an elevated command prompt.

        4. In the elevated command prompt, type this command and then press Enter key:

        DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /Scanhealth

        5. Post file checksur.log somewhere where I can view it.

        The question here is whether this particular iteration of Scanhealth could yield more results than the other two methods I’ve already carried out yesterday. Is the likelihood of finding new errors higher ?

        Installing KB3177467 installs a newer version of smipi.dll and newer versions of some other files, but won’t fix the corrupted smipi.dll. If you’re wary of installing KB3177467, you can skip installing it for now.

        Not necessarily wary. Personally, I’m okay with repairing smipi.dll by simply overwriting it (and other files if needed), if manual repairs by way of DISM are theoretically trickier or even less predictable. Does the new install overwrite the old file, or will the old corrupted one stay even after the install ?

        Once again, thanks for answering my questions.

        P.S. Ignore the anonymous post above (if it gets approved). That was me, but I forgot to log in. I really need to get the hang of the different nature of these forums.

      • #141213 Reply

        anonymous

        The other thing I recommend to do to fix the corrupted smipi.dll file is:

        1. Download (using Method 2) version “All supported x86-based versions of Windows 7” of update KB3020369.

        2. Copy file downloaded in step 1 to folder c:\windows\CheckSUR\packages. Create this folder first if it doesn’t exist.

        3. Open an elevated command prompt.

        4. In the elevated command prompt, type this command and then press Enter key:

        DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /Scanhealth

        5. Post file checksur.log somewhere where I can view it.

        Interesting. However, what about possible side effects to elsewhere in the system, and to other parts of WU ? I could go with KB3020369, but if it inadvertently creates another problem (with WU or something else), possibly over version compatibility or similar, that would be a real pain.

        Just a thought. Not saying it won’t work, but I’m just not within the position to experiment too much with my Windows files.

        I’ll attempt another CheckSUR scan with this update, if you give the go-ahead.

        P.S. Installing KB3177467 installs a newer version of smipi.dll and newer versions of some other files, but won’t fix the corrupted smipi.dll. If you’re wary of installing KB3177467, you can skip installing it for now.

        I understand that. But ultimately, if the smipi.dll gets replaced, it’s as good as fixed, right? (Even though it’s a repair-by-replacement, rather than by genuinely repairing the file with the issue.)

        If there is little hope for repairing the issue in smipi.dll by conventional methods (including via DISM, with the help of that aforementioned update), I wouldn’t mind installing an update that just overwrites whatever file(s) had been experiencing issues. As long as the affected files are the same version and things work afterward, I’m game.

    • #141256 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      The system keeps different versions of file smipi.dll. Installing KB3177467 probably would not fix the existing corrupted version of smipi.dll. On the other hand, your system probably would no longer need the older version (whether corrupt or not) of smipi.dll after KB3177467 is installed.

      The steps in post #141106 do not install KB3020369. Instead, it allows the DISM command to get the non-corrupt version 6.1.7601.18766 of file smipi.dll from KB3020369 to fix the corrupted version 6.1.7601.18766 with. If you want a reference, see section “How to fix errors that are found in the CheckSUR.log” of https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/947821/fix-windows-update-errors-by-using-the-dism-or-system-update-readiness (except we’re substituting a DISM command in place of System Update Readiness Tool because it’s newer).

      The safer thing to do is probably to do the steps in post #141106 first. However, Microsoft does intend that systems should have KB3177467 installed; it is classified as a critical update by Microsoft. The reason KB3177467 was not installed previously is probably because of issue #2 at https://askwoody.com/forums/topic/group-b-win78-1-missing-updates-hiding-rollups-security-only-patches/#post-136952.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • #141282 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’m quickly running out of time. The November updates will be here soon, and once again, I’ll have to waste several weeks until we get a a good knowledge of what the November Rollup is like.

        So, in short, should I install KB3177467 ? Please give me the straightest answer possible. I really want to resolve this before the month is out. I have and will make plenty of restore points, so I’m willing to take some risk.

         

         

        • #141294 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          should I install KB3177467 ? Please give me the straightest answer possible

          Yes.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #141313 Reply

          MrBrian
          AskWoody MVP

          The October updates will still be available even after the November updates are released.

          I recommend to do these steps first: https://askwoody.com/forums/topic/unable-to-install-september-2017-quality-rollup-due-to-code-800700c1-situation/#post-141106. When your servicing stack is functioning normally again, then we’ll install KB3177467. Please delay installation of KB3177467 until we fix the corrupted smipi.dll.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
          • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
          • #141563 Reply

            ZemplinTemplar
            AskWoody Lounger

            One more quick question: Will I have to restart my PC after applying KB3020369 and KB3177467 ? Each of them separately, of course.

            • #141633 Reply

              MrBrian
              AskWoody MVP

              It’s probably a good idea to restart your computer after installing servicing stack updates. Note however that my steps do not install KB3020369, and I recommend to not install KB3177467 until the servicing stack is fixed by doing the steps in post #141106.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #141663 Reply

              ZemplinTemplar
              AskWoody Lounger

              I see ! I thought KB3020369 would be a prerequisite to carrying out the steps you’ve listed most recently. And it sort of is, but I don’t need to install it. Sorry about the confusion ! Serves me right for reading fast…

              So, I’ll just DL KB3020369, put it in the CheckSUR folder (I already have it, don’t worry), run the command prompt procedure again, post the results. Gotcha. I’ll try it in a short while and see if I’ll get any results.

            • #141666 Reply

              MrBrian
              AskWoody MVP

              Given the corrupted version of smipi.dll, it appears that your system probably already has KB3020369 installed.

              Good luck :).

              • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #141690 Reply

              Bob99
              AskWoody Lounger

              (This post is meant as a reply to post #141663 of Oct 29th, 2017 at 10:19 am. My earlier reply wound up in the wrong place on this thread for some reason, even though I clicked on the reply link in post 141663.)

              … So, I’ll just DL KB3020369, put it in the CheckSUR folder (I already have it, don’t worry)…

              Zemplin-

              Please make sure you put the downloaded file in the packages sub-folder of the CheckSUR folder. If that sub-folder (packages) doesn’t exist, you can create it, as @mrbrian mentioned.

              That should hopefully enable the DISM command to produce the results @mrbrian is expecting from it when you run it.

              c:\windows\CheckSUR\packages

              I have added the bolding above for emphasis only.

              I hope this helps!

              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #141873 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        Okay, here are the latest CheckSUR logs:

        http://www.mediafire.com/file/cktpgo40g66sah6/CheckSUR_via_DISM_and_KB3020369_%2830th_October_2017%29.log

        http://www.mediafire.com/file/7vb06r1ofd4gz6f/CheckSUR.persist_%28current_for_30th_October_2017%29.log

        I’ve included the CheckSUR.persist file in case you’d need a better idea about the history of the error. Don’t worry, it’s a very short log, mostly just the recent scans.

        I’ll be waiting for further advice.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #141967 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      Unfortunately the DISM command didn’t replace the corrupted version of smipi.dll with the non-corrupt version.

      Here are two options for what to do next:

      Option 1: Replace the corrupted version of smipi.dll with the non-corrupt version. I have the non-corrupt version that you need from my computer (VirusTotal report). I could upload this file somewhere for you. Then you would download this file, and run a command to replace the corrupt version. It would also use program PowerRun to avoid permissions issues when replacing the file. I tested that this works on a virtual machine in which I purposely corrupted smipi.dll and then replaced it.

      Option 2: Install KB3177467. I’m not sure if installation of KB3177467 will succeed because your existing servicing stack isn’t functioning correctly because of corrupt file smipi.dll.

      I would prefer Option 1 but you are free to choose which option.

      • #141984 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        Well, KB3177467 is not much of an option if it’s capability to resolve the error with the smipi.dll is more dubious rather than certain.

        We might as well go with Option 1. I don’t know much about the nature of that .dll file, but please bear in mind my version of W7 is: Windows 7 Professional 32-bit (x86) with Service Pack 1.

        As I don’t know a thing about whether that specific .dll file could differ between 32-bit and 64-bit versions of W7, I’m just putting this out there. Best to avoid potential misunderstandings if you’d be using a 64-bit OS.

        You can upload the file somewhere safe and I’ll work it from there.

    • #141998 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      1. Download smipi.dll from the link I sent to you via direct message. This is v6.1.7601.18766 (x86) of file smipi.dll, which matches the version listed at https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3020369/april-2015-servicing-stack-update-for-windows-7-and-windows-server-200 for your operating system.

      2. Download PowerRun from http://www.sordum.org/9416/powerrun-v1-1-run-with-highest-privileges/. Unzip it (ask me if you don’t know how to do this) and run powerrun.exe.

      3. Click PowerRun’s “Launch Command Prompt” icon.

      4. At the command prompt launched in step 3, type this command (all on one line) replacing

      replace_this_with_path_to_downloaded_file

      with the path to the file you downloaded in step 1. Let me know if you need more help with doing this.

      5. It should ask to overwrite the existing smipi.dll file (choose yes). If not, something went wrong.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #142013 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thank you. You will have to reupload the file, the upload apparently ran out of time. (I was away and not sure when it would get sent.) If you can, please reupload it.

        Any particular folder I should place the unzipped PowerRun folder into ? (I have the folder unzipped, it has a 32bit and a 64bit executable, a config file and a Readme file. Seems like everything needed is there.)

         

        • #142020 Reply

          MrBrian
          AskWoody MVP

          You’re welcome :).

          I sent another direct message. It expires after 1 download or 24 hours.

          You can put PowerRun anywhere, as long as it runs when you run powerrun.exe.

          • #142032 Reply

            ZemplinTemplar
            AskWoody Lounger

            Quick question about the exact file path to the .dll, within the command:

            Would, e.g. D:\Fixfolder\smipi.dll be a correct file path (to replace that default note) ?

            “Fixfolder” is just an example, I might name that temporary folder something different.

        • #142022 Reply

          MrBrian
          AskWoody MVP

          I also uploaded the file to http://www.filedropper.com/smipi in case the other links expire. I sent them privately because they expire after 1 download.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
          • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      • #142046 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        Good news. Everything went according to plan. The file has been overwritten.

        I’ve made a link to the folder with the affected .dll file earlier, so I checked up on the file immediately after the overwriting happened. It’s there, the .dll has been successfully overwritten.

        Now what ? Try if WU is working again, or install that other security stack ? I’m leaning towards keeping things simple and just taking a look at WU.

         

    • #142049 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      Great :).

      Let’s try this:

      1. Delete the KB3020369 file that you put in folder c:\windows\CheckSUR\packages in a previous step

      2. Open an elevated command prompt.

      3. In the elevated command prompt, type this command and then press Enter key:

      DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /Scanhealth

      4. Post file checksur.log somewhere where I can view it.

      • #142051 Reply

        ZemplinTemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’ve checked the logs, no errors detected.

        http://www.mediafire.com/file/ic4px2jiqvt9ctj/CheckSUR_%2830th_October_2017_evening%29.log

        http://www.mediafire.com/file/uuzy3b3a4a8c642/CheckSUR.persist_%2830th_October_2017_evening%29.log

        I’ve already tested the October Rollup in WU, it installed without any issues. Going to reboot Windows now and report back later.

        Thanks.

        • #142053 Reply

          MrBrian
          AskWoody MVP

          Good :).

          Your run of the sfc /scannow command a few weeks ago showed a few other corrupt files. I recommend doing https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-use-sfc-scannow-to-repair-windows-system-files-2626161 again and post the relevant log file entries just like you did before.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
          • #143136 Reply

            ZemplinTemplar
            AskWoody Lounger

            Hello again.

            I ran the sfc /scannow commad twice this evening. It did it’s job fine, but the CBS.log file was an unpleasant surprise. Remember when I sent the previous files and they were only around 50 kB max ?

            Well, CBS.log has ballooned from those 50 kB to an insane 202 MB ! Honestly, I have no idea what’s going on. I ran sfc /scannow again, for the second time. Same results. No change in CBS.log file size. Worst of all, whenever I try to open it, Notepad can’t take it and crashes. So I can’t even read the contents of the .log file. Bizarre.

            Since I doubt you’d be happy about me sending you a 200+ MB text file to download (and one that crashes anyway), I’m sending you the following image in the attachment. Results of the second sfc /scannow run of today, and the CBS folder with the ballooned CBS.log file (note added, red-highlighted bits).

            sfc-scannow-and-weird-CBS.log-size-issue-1st-November-2017

            Any ideas on what might be the issue ? Did we accidentally goof up something by our use of the update to fix that .dll file ?

            Attachments:
            You must be logged in to view attached files.
            • #143200 Reply

              MrBrian
              AskWoody MVP

              I believe there is nothing unusual about cbs.log being 200 MB in size.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #143146 Reply

            ZemplinTemplar
            AskWoody Lounger

            Let me guess… This might be a Windows Modules Installer issue ?

            Notice that the CBS.log with the issue is last dated to Monday, 30 October. Ergo, my last two sfc /scannow efforts have not overriden the CBS.log file. When I tried to delete the 200+ CBS.log file, Windows suddenly told me I can’t do that, because the file is still running in Windows Modules Installer. I open up Task Manager, scroll down, and yep… There it is.

            WMI-prbly-causing-issues-with-CBS-log-file

            Now what ? 🙁 I can’t even send you the latest logs, because we have to deal with this nonsense. Is it safe to just end the WMI process in Task Manager ? I’m asking because I don’t want to accidentally damage the OS. If it’s A-Okay, I’m killing it instantly, then throwing out the CBS file (if possible) and running a new sfc /scannow to get you a proper log.

            Attachments:
            You must be logged in to view attached files.
          • #143154 Reply

            ZemplinTemplar
            AskWoody Lounger

            OK, I’ve solved the issue ! Went to services.msc, shut down WMI safely through that, then deleted CBS.log, did an sfc /scannow. Then generated the current sfcdetails file from the current CBS.log: http://www.mediafire.com/file/p2fb2sc29pbsd1z/sfcdetails_%281_November_2017%29.txt

            Talk about jumping through a ton of hoops ! Hopefully you’ll find that sfcdetails file helpful.

    • #143205 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      To fix the corrupt file hlink.dll:

      1. Download hlink.dll from http://www.filedropper.com/hlink. This file is from my computer.

      2. Download PowerRun from http://www.sordum.org/9416/powerrun-v1-1-run-with-highest-privileges/. Unzip it and run powerrun.exe.

      3. Click PowerRun’s “Launch Command Prompt” icon.

      4. At the command prompt launched in step 3, type this command (all on one line) replacing

      replace_this_with_path_to_downloaded_file

      with the path to the file you downloaded in step 1. Let me know if you need more help with doing this.

      5. It should ask to overwrite the existing hlink.dll file (choose yes). If not, something went wrong.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #143209 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      To fix the corrupt file msimain.sdb:

      1. Uninstall Windows update KB3107998. If you need more help on how to do this, please ask.

      2. Install Windows update KB3107998 via Windows Update.

    • #143210 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      If the previous 2 procedures seemed to go ok, let’s try this again:

      Do https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-use-sfc-scannow-to-repair-windows-system-files-2626161 and post the relevant log file entries just like you did before.

    • #149351 Reply

      ZemplinTemplar
      AskWoody Lounger

      To fix the corrupt file hlink.dll

      First of all, I’m sorry I didn’t post in over a month. Sadly, I was very busy. Second, I’d like to thank you for this procedure. I haven’t tried it yet, but I certainly will. Seems straightforward enough, given that I’ve already done the same basic procedure for the other .dll file.

      I’ll make a restore point just in case (probably no need to, but to be on the safe side…).

      As soon as I’m finished, I’ll report back. I will tackle msimain.sdb a bit later, if I find time this week. Thank you for your patience and advice so far, it’s been exceptionally helpful over the last few weeks.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #150367 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Lounger

      To fix the corrupt file hlink.dll

      First of all, I’m sorry I didn’t post in over a month. Sadly, I was very busy. Second, I’d like to thank you for this procedure. I haven’t tried it yet, but I certainly will. Seems straightforward enough, given that I’ve already done the same basic procedure for the other .dll file. I’ll make a restore point just in case (probably no need to, but to be on the safe side…). As soon as I’m finished, I’ll report back. I will tackle msimain.sdb a bit later, if I find time this week. Thank you for your patience and advice so far, it’s been exceptionally helpful over the last few weeks.

      If none of what everyone has suggested, try turning off Protected Mode in Internet Explorer, and then try installing the update. It is worth a shot since I vaguely recall seeing the same failure error 800700C1 well over a year ago when I tried to install an update. If this works, then turn IE Protected Mode back on after the update is successfully installed. And then we can focus on cleaning up any other issues.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Unable to install September 2017 Quality Rollup due to "Code 800700C1" situation

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