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  • Updating drivers

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Updating drivers

    • This topic has 4 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 1 week, 1 day ago by anonymous.
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      • #2369753
        Ken
        AskWoody Plus

        Microsoft update tries to update many drivers, which I hide based on your recommendations. However, any time I have tried to find any particular update from the original vendor (Intel, Lenovo, Brother, etc.) I cannot find that specific driver, even searching for the version number or any other identifying info MS gives.

         I have two Lenovo laptops, both with Lenovo Vantage. I receive many driver updates from MS, but when I run Lenovo Vantage, nothing similar comes up, even though it is set to update “critical” and “recommended” updates.

         The same applies to Intel drivers,. I can never find the specific one MS mentions.

         Should I unhide all these drivers and let MS update them? Many date back to 2018.

         

        Or, “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it”?

        • This topic was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Ken.
      • #2369868
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Should I unhide all these drivers and let MS update them?

        No.

        You should search and download drives from the manufacturers sites. Don’t use MS version for search, use your hardware type/version.
        Lenovo too is way behind the current drivers versions.

        I use Lenovo laptops for the last 20+ years and never updated drivers using Windows Update nor Lenovo support site : https://pcsupport.lenovo.com/..
        The only updates downloaded from Lenovo are BIOS updates.

      • #2369882
        alejr
        AskWoody Lounger

        Same here.

        The problem with using Microsoft’s drivers is they’re “generic” and don’t always provide access to all the functionality that’s built into a device.

        • i.e. my LogiTech mouse has 5 different buttons (left, right, scroll wheel, left/right scroll button and press down scroll button.) The Microsoft driver Windows installs for it only allows me to use the left & right buttons and the scroll wheel. It doesn’t sense the other 2 buttons attached to the scroll wheel so they don’t work. The LogiTech driver allows me to use all 5 buttons.

        If your PC’s manufacturer doesn’t provide updated drivers for something built into their PC (i.e USB ports, NIC, audio, etc.), search for drivers using the actual “manufacturer” of that device. I downloaded my drivers directly from Intel, Brother, RealTek, LogiTech, etc., etc.

        You can see who made each device using Windows built-in msinfo32.exe or, if that doesn’t show who made it… which it sometimes doesn’t, use 3rd party software such as HWinfo, Speccy or Belarc to find out.

        If you still can find out who made a device, open device manager, open properties for that particular device, select the Details tab, select Hardware Ids in the Properties drop-down and then google the values shown to find what drivers are available for that device.

        Be aware, you may have to “force” Windows to install the non-Microsoft driver by selecting the I have a disk option in the driver update process, pointing it to the location of the .inf file you downloaded, and then telling it to install the driver anyway when it complains it can’t “verify” the driver will work with your device.

      • #2369875
        anonymous
        Guest

        “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it”?

        Correct.

         

      • #2369910
        anonymous
        Guest

        I’ve found that if you go deep with anything in Windows, drivers are the best place to get smart.

        If you’re happy with performance, newer or “betterer” drivers may not be noticed.  If you do a lot of intensive work, graphics, video editing, gaming, have a 4k screen, drivers can make a huge difference. So can more memory, SSD’s etc.  If general use is herky jerky, drivers may be a solution.

        I had a new Lenovo Think Pad for a week or so last month, excellent but way too much for my needs; it was returned.  Almost all the drivers today are windows generic versions with maybe some dressing added.  Welcome to Linux, not a good thing IMO.

        Don’t let Windows update drivers if for no other reason than you may get an ancient version, an old copy saved in your driver store or recovery partition just in case.  Driver update can be disabled in Settings or directly by Control Panel>System>Advanced System Settings>Hardware>Device Installation Settings.

        I believe the version issues you’re having are because OEM’s give drivers different id’s/numbers than found on say Intel or Nvidia’s sites; e.g.,  today’s current released Intel Graphics driver is 27.20.100.9466.

        Keep a link to your OEM’s driver page, Lenovo, check it periodically and use it to reinstall custom feature drivers (touchpad, mouse, airplane buttons) if needed.  Security and BIOS updates should be checked for periodically.  Do this manually; uninstall/don’t use Vantage, learn which drivers are which, it’s not difficult.  After a few years, new drivers become sparse and the autoupdaters rarely find much.

        For graphics, wifi and maybe ethernet drivers, use the device manufacturer’s site.  Intel, Nvidia and AMD provide good support for older machines with usually much more current drivers.  You may have to uninstall the OEM drivers for these to install.

        Control Panel>Device Manager contains all your device drivers, versions and ability to update with stored versions or let windows update do it.  Shortcut Control Panel to the Desktop, it’s in Start Menu>Windows System, right click on it.

        There are some good third party driver updaters but you really have to understand if “new!” is better.  My Dell laptop uses Intel’s Rapid Storage drive manager, latest version is 18.xxx, but the version that runs best is from 2016, ver 16.xxx.  Utilities will always try to install ver 18 which is glitchy.  Utilities can find faster chipset, cpu, usb and bus drivers you can’t find otherwise.

        If you really understand the driver morass, Snappy Driver Installer Origin is the best utility I’ve used, freeware.  The interface is weird. Setup, use drivers for this computer only, just indexes. Use advanced mode, search, choose, pick make a restore and use install in the left side bar menu.

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