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  • Upgrade from 1703 to 1709 hoses one admin profile

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Upgrade from 1703 to 1709 hoses one admin profile

    This topic contains 14 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  PerthMike 10 months ago.

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    • #225613 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Oh dear. Those of us running 1703 will have to move to a new version pretty quickly. I’ll be weighing the options and making a recommendation in the n
      [See the full post at: Upgrade from 1703 to 1709 hoses one admin profile]

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #225619 Reply

      krzemien
      AskWoody Lounger

      For what it’s worth: nothing of that magnitude, but I have some doubts about stability of having /using more than one profile on my PC.

      What I’m seeing – but am still in the PoC development stage – are LiveKernelEvents 141 & bugchecks 116 (so both related to video TDR failure) when my wife’s profile is used. I seemingly do not witness any of this when I use my profile only.

      See last post in this thread:

      https://community.amd.com/message/2881399#comment-2881399

      If profile is corrupt or its permissions are somehow off-piste – which could be the case but I would be at loss to say why and how – how does one check & restore these? The last thing I want is to remove and create profile from scratch…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #225622 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Which version are you running?

        Any idea what (if anything) triggers the problem?

      • #225635 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        I have some doubts about stability of having /using more than one profile on my PC.

        Having more than one profile on your computer is essential:
        * If one of your profiles gets corrupted, you can use the other.
        * You can use a non-admin profile for everyday use, and an admin profile for those times when you need admin rights.
        * An extra admin profile will be a lifesafer, if your normal admin profile gets corrupted.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #225625 Reply

      krzemien
      AskWoody Lounger

      1809, but I did experience both LiveKernelEvents 141 & bugchecks 116 on previous versions as well, just was not aware that they might be related to my wife using this PC (which in itself is possibly quite a credible explanation, but I digress). So I don’t think latest version is a problem. But it might be more general Windows problem (again, it might not though…).

      I disabled Fast Startup already as PC was not re-initialising display at all & was freezing once powered back (again: after my wife used PC day before). I neither use any power saving setting (or I’m not aware of any still left in place).

      Another funny instance where I am more than likely to witness LiveKernelEvents 141 is where PC is left in ‘logged off’ state for some (random) time, or when two accounts are used (logged on) simultaneously. When one of us returns to PC, on 1809 display usually cannot be brought back to live and OS graciously crashes with ultimate bugcheck 116, although in the past it was possible that display actually managed to recover.

      I sincerely cannot narrow the culprit down apart from these scenarios. I was exploring obsolete driver avenue – it’s rather  dated indeed as neither HP nor AMD do good job here, hence me raising this on AMD & HP forums respectively – but except that PC performs okay and without any issues when used.

      • #225709 Reply

        anonymous

        Had those bug checks happen after an early spring cumulative update for Windows 10 1607, I replaced the video and chipset drivers from AMD’s site which is less than easy to navigate and that fixed all issues. I always hide any forced drivers from Microsoft.

    • #225633 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      My home machines that were upgraded from 1703 to 1709 have 1 admin profile, 3 user profiles. No issues after the upgrade.

      Profile corruption isn’t too terribly new, so I’m willing to plead ignorance on this and say it’s a corrupt profile exacerbated by the upgrade.

    • #225658 Reply

      krzemien
      AskWoody Lounger

      Very true that – both accounts have admin rights though.

       

       

    • #225695 Reply

      Zaphyrus
      AskWoody Lounger

      How sad that some of us choose to remain out of support since the newest versions aren’t stable enough.

      Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #225729 Reply

      ch100
      AskWoody_MVP

      One possible solution is to ALWAYS do edition upgrade when logged on as the built-in Administrator (the one disabled by default). It will be disabled again by the setup routine, but will complete the job first.
      This avoids all profile issues due to the upgrade, including the recent profile deletion when upgrading to 1809 (I think, but cannot confirm as the deletion is caused by a setting which should have never been implemented by non-professional users anyway).
      Never use the built-in Administrator as regular user on anything after and including Windows 8 and do not disable completely UAC, as this causes issues with Windows as a whole.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #225731 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody_MVP

        do not disable completely UAC, as this causes issues with Windows as a whole.

        …Unless you really, really know what you’re doing. 😉

        In all seriousness, clearly Microsoft must have some use for it (probably internally) because disabling it actually causes fewer issues than you’d think it would, even though it’s no longer a setting you can directly configure via the UI. I’ve been running Win 8.1 with UAC fully disabled for 5 years, and I’ve also done it with all my Windows 10 VM installs. In fact, it runs just fine – more like a desktop system of old – and UAC being off simply blocks most Metro/Modern/UWP Apps from running – which I consider a very nice feature, not a problem. Caveat: I haven’t tried it with v1809 yet.

        Speaking as a nerd’s geek, in my opinion UAC was one of the worst ideas in the long sad history of bad ideas. But I do understand how we got here.

        -Noel

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #225753 Reply

          ch100
          AskWoody_MVP

          It works well in Windows 7 but not really after.
          It breaks the UWP apps and even if one does not need Weather, the redesigned Calculator, Maps or whatever, do not forget that even the redesigned Control Panel which is the Settings app is implemented as UWP app.
          Sure if you really know what you do, you can workaround many limitations, but it is just not worth the effort.
          The built-in Administrator profile has a role though when required to perform certain administrative tasks and accessing certain folders, as it has inherent UAC bypass functionality.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #225768 Reply

      krzemien
      AskWoody Lounger

      Had those bug checks happen after an early spring cumulative update for Windows 10 1607, I replaced the video and chipset drivers from AMD’s site which is less than easy to navigate and that fixed all issues. I always hide any forced drivers from Microsoft.

      There’s no newer driver available for my R390 card than the one that’s supplied by HP I’m afraid – which was one of the avenues I was exploring.

      The moment I install AMD-supplied driver, R390 becomes R200 and that’s what Windows does not like and reverts the driver to its own and very dated one.

      I really do not like the idea of continuous faffing with hiding/unhiding driver as I’m sure it will get pushed again. So would rather have addressed it at source, i.e. by either HP or AMD releasing correct driver matching card’s hardware ID.

      • #225814 Reply

        anonymous

        Hmm…You have an R9 390 card? Have you tried contacting AMD directly to help resolve the issue? Also have you gingerly asked what your wife might be doing with her profile differently from you?

        Using WUShowHide to hide drivers of doom from Microsoft is a worthwhile use of time and not nothing, if you continue to use Windows 10.

    • #226041 Reply

      PerthMike
      AskWoody Lounger

      I am facing a different problem. We had some ex-office (not Office) PCs sold off to staff cheaply, so I acquired one a while ago. Thought I’d use it as a test machine for Windows 10.

      It’s a five year old Acer Veriton, and I acquired it during the free Win 10 upgrade period. So that’s what I did first, installed the original Windows 10 on it, then, more recently, upgraded to 1703.

      I’ve been running 1703 on it until recently when I thought I’d upgrade it to 1709, via burnt-ISO… Nope, that failed during the third-or-so reboot and cycled back to the previous version. Tried 1803, same.

      Then, I even tried fresh installing off the ISO’s, same. Looks like 1709 and 1803 simply don’t run on that hardware any more.

      So it looks like these PCs are now end-of-life for Windows 10 even before their Windows 7 support would have ended. I’m sure hardware vendors love this added obsolescence built into their product.

      No matter where you go, there you are.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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