• Upgrading processor to permit installing Windows 11.

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    #2470740

    I have an Acer Aspire minitower computer, model number TC-780-UR15, which has an Intel core i5-7400 CPU @ 3.00 GHz processor. Can you tell me what processor upgrade will let me install Windows 11? Also, I have been informed the motherboard will require an upgrade. Can you tell me what products I need to install—part numbers, etc.?

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    • #2470859

      no CPU upgrade alone will allow you to officially put Windows 11 on there as most 7th gen cpus will be blocked by Win11 setup since Acer will not provide Win11 compatible drivers for your Aspire TC-780-UR15 desktop computer. that specific model only supports 7th gen Intel processors and can never be upgraded to 8th gen or newer and has not been officially tested for Windows 11 compatibility by Acer themselves.

      you can either contact Acer from this link and ask them or post in the Acer community forums desktop PC section as to what to do from this point forward and get a response there instead.

    • #2470991

      Sometimes you just have to buy new hardware.

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

    • #2470997

      Or keep running W10 until the hardware dies.
      I’m sure there will be lots of posts about keeping W10 running long after MS drop support.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2471302

      Also, I have been informed the motherboard will require an upgrade.

      A CPU upgrade to a new generation will require a motherboard upgrade as well. Intel has for the most part been requiring that for many generations of hardware.

      Each generation most often involves a change in chipset support, as well as can involve the CPU socket design, and possibly even the RAM type (e.g. DDR3, DDR4, DDR5).

      Most hobbyists that build their own computers usually plan on replacing the motherboard, CPU and RAM every few years to keep up with technology. But they can retain the PC case, power supply, fans, and drives. The upgrade just involves swapping out the PC’s main guts.

      Most consumer PCs will need to be replaced, as they are not designed for installation of retail 3rd party motherboards.

    • #2471313

      A CPU upgrade to a new generation will require a motherboard upgrade as well.

      That’s not necessarily true.

      My new Asus Maximus XI Gene supports Celeron, Pentium, 8th and 9th generation Intel CPU’s and my old Asus Maximus VIII Gene supported Celeron, Pentium, 6th and 7th generation Intel CPUs.

      I was also able to upgrade the CPU in both my Dell D830 and HP 6910p laptops to an Intel core 2 duo 2.6 GHz T9500 which was not an available CPU option when they were still being sold.

    • #2471320

      A CPU upgrade to a new generation will require a motherboard upgrade as well.

      That’s not necessarily true.

      My new Asus Maximus XI Gene supports Celeron, Pentium, 8th and 9th generation Intel CPU’s and my old Asus Maximus VIII Gene supported Celeron, Pentium, 6th and 7th generation Intel CPUs.

      I was also able to upgrade the CPU in both my Dell D830 and HP 6910p laptops to an Intel core 2 duo 2.6 GHz T9500 which was not an available CPU option when they were still being sold.

      That quote is somewhat out of context, and makes my statement appear inaccurate. I clearly should have stated that would be the case most often with retail consumer PCs.

      We are discussing a retail consumer PC here, as in the OP’s question. A bit of a difference from a 3rd party, high-end gamer motherboard I would say! I would suggest that your solution is applicable to home PC builders.

      • #2471356

        Ah, but my Dell D830 and HP 6910p laptops are consumer PC’s and I was able to update them to a newer generation CPU.

    • #2471392

      Ah, but my Dell D830 and HP 6910p laptops are consumer PC’s and I was able to update them to a newer generation CPU.

      You got lucky! ๐Ÿ™‚

      I bought my first off-the-shelf consumer PC in 1997. Have been building my own since 2000, after recognizing that most OEM PCs were not really intended to be upgraded for long life. A proprietary motherboard form factor was the first clue, vs. standard ATX, etc. Planned obsolescence…

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