• Various .NET Frameworks EoS date

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    #2360887

    Versions in question for EoS are .NET 4.5.2/ 4.6 and 4.6.1

    Came across an article which informs .NET Frameworks 4.5.2, 4.6, and 4.6.1 will reach end of support on April 26, 2022.
    Note: Beyond this date, there will no longer be security updates or technical support for these versions. More info from the MSFT .NET blog – by Jamshed Principal Engineering Manager, .NET

    NOTE for Windows 7 ESU and Windows 8.1 users
    You might want to consider moving to .NET framework 4.6.2 or greater soon or prior to the EoS date.
    .NET 4.8 is available via WU to make things easier for Win7/Win8.1 homeusers.
    Yes it’s nigh on a year away but memory fades….

    "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
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    • #2360932

      On Windows 10, and this might work for earlier versions too, you can check what .NET Framework version you have by navigating in the Registtry Editor to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP. From there, select the latest version (probably v4), select the Client key, and look for the Version value.

      The are other ways to find your version, but this is probably the quickest way. There’s an excellent article on Windows Central explaining the various ways, but I’m blocked from posting it again.

    • #2360954
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      • #2438755

        Yes, this program has recently been updated to version 22 (which apparently can now detect the various post-4.8 .Net Core environments).

        Anyway, Susan’s Computer World article from today ended with a “I’m hoping someone will come up with a better and easier way to know what [.Net] is on our systems.”  Though not perfect, certainly this portable tool is easier for most users than fiddling with the registry or the command prompt or PowerShell.

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        • #2438902

          I wasn’t thrilled about the lack of ssl, the browsing to a one drive for a download ergo why I didn’t link to that tool.  It’s not teaching good security practices and safe software.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2438998

          I don’t remember the previous versions going out to a One Drive file.  My normal browser wouldn’t let me download it, which gave me pause, but I was able to use a different browser successfully.  The various general software repositories were one or more versions behind in what they were offering for this tool.

          I have not tried the couple of home-grown options from Raymond.cc to see if they are any good for describing .Net info.

        • #2439067

          They are geeky.  🙂  Like I said I haven’t found a nice gui way that doesn’t make me wince.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

    • #2361838

      Thank you very much for letting us know! I have NET 4.6.1 for my Win7 pro, but installing .NET 4.6.2 won’t have me searching out newer quality rollups and v2’s I think as the KB files are conveniently .NET 4.6 – 4.7.2 (.NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 ) – Ndp 47?
      As I find Microsoft .NET Framework 4.6.2 (Offline Installer) Published: 7/20/2016

      Regarding .NET 4.8 for win7 or win 8.1 (Last Modified: 1/9/2020), will i need to seek out various .NET Quality Rollups with version 2’s (v2)?
      Can I rely on Windows Update to come up with missed .NET 4.8 updates + v2 files for Win 8.1? I have previously hidden .NET 4.8 downloads.
      Thanks very much 🙂

    • #2438874

      All above posts are tagged with incorrect dates starting with opening entry: April 27, 2021 at 9:15 am

      This post, the one I’ve created, reflects the correct date and I did nothing special.

      On hiatus {with backup and coffee}
      offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
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      • #2438875

        The article linked in the original post is dated April 26, 2021.
        The original post is dated April 27, 2021.
        How did you determine all the posts are tagged with incorrect dates?

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        • #2438877

          Thanks for the information. I thought this was was recent posting. My mistake and sorry for any confusion i may have created.

          On hiatus {with backup and coffee}
          offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
          offline▸ Win10Pro 20H2.19042.685 x86 Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD WindowsDefender WuMgr GuineaPigVariant
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      • #2438876

        The thread is a year old. You posted today.
        What’s wrong with the dates?

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        • #2438878

          Again, apologies for the confusion I created.

          On hiatus {with backup and coffee}
          offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
          offline▸ Win10Pro 20H2.19042.685 x86 Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD WindowsDefender WuMgr GuineaPigVariant
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        • #2438899

          I have days like that too  🙂

          cheers, Paul

    • #2439133

      To determine your .net versions, information is here:
      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/core/install/how-to-detect-installed-versions?pivots=os-windows

      For runtime versions:

      • Open an administrator command prompt
      • Type:
        dotnet --list-runtimes

      Other commands are included in the above link.

      On hiatus {with backup and coffee}
      offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
      offline▸ Win10Pro 20H2.19042.685 x86 Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD WindowsDefender WuMgr GuineaPigVariant
      online▸ Win11Pro 21H2.22000.675 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox101.0b6 MicrosoftDefender WuMgr
      • #2439232

        I can’t get that “dotnet” command to work in a Windows 10 system with various .Net runtimes installed.  I think it’s targeting only the newer .Net “Core” stuff, not the older .Net that’s at version 4.8 right now.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2439247

          I have access to another Windows 11 computer, and I tried the command on the other Windows 11 system. The command wasn’t recognized on the second Windows 11 system.

          I have .NET 6 on this system where the command works, but not on the other system where the command is unrecognized. No .NET 6 may be the reason the command isn’t recognized on your system.

          From the example shown in the Microsoft page (in the link I gave above), older versions are recognized when the dotnet command is invoked.

          More on .NET 6 and other is here:
          https://dotnet.microsoft.com/en-us/platform/support/policy/dotnet-core

          I suspect there are major differences in each of the .NET versions.
          ————
          I also have Microsoft development software on this system that is not present on the other system. This might also be a factor.

          On hiatus {with backup and coffee}
          offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
          offline▸ Win10Pro 20H2.19042.685 x86 Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD WindowsDefender WuMgr GuineaPigVariant
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        • #2439279

          Agreed, it’s only for the “new” stuff not the “framework” stuff – the .NET that shipped with the base Windows. Typically the new stuff gets installed because an application has installed it.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2439467

      For “classic” .NET Framework information:

      My information looks like:
      classic

      Compared with C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework and C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64 respectively:

      frameworkframework64

      On hiatus {with backup and coffee}
      offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
      offline▸ Win10Pro 20H2.19042.685 x86 Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD WindowsDefender WuMgr GuineaPigVariant
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    • #2440602

      After reading Susan’s ComputerWorld article, I have a question:

      I have never turned on ‘receive updates for other MS products’.

      Running the command prompt in article shows 6 directories (first two simply show a “.”, and a “..”, the others listed:

      v1.0.3705

      v1.1.4322

      v2.0.50727

      v4.0.30319

      (can figure out how to insert pic for your reference). No v3, v3.5, nor v4.5 or v4.8 listed.

      I use winshowhide, have held off April CU updates . SO do I flip the toggle on ‘receive other updates’ and install any .Net and .Net framework updates that show up BEFORE I do April updates? Or after? Or let them all install at the same time? Confused.

      Am running Win 10 Pro, 21H2 build 19044.1586, Feature Pack 120.2212.4170.0

    • #2440743

      .NET updates are cumulative (i.e. the newest one includes the fixes from all previous updates.)

      The April .NET update is KB5012117 and you can either download and “manually” install it from the Microsoft Update Catalog or allow simply let Windows update install it as part of its normal month updates.

      BTW, I also have “receive updates for other MS products” turned off so I always manually download and install any new .NET updates that get mentioned here when they post the list of new updates each month.

       

      • #2446880

        Ty, I did receive kb5012117 on April 24. I decided to turn on ‘receive updates for other products’ to see what it might offer (ie. any modules, .NET 5.0.17, .Net 6.0.5 as noted by others on the site) 2 days prior to hiding May updates via winshowhide. Nothing showed up, just the CU, .Net framework for 3.5 & 4.8, and MSRT (which are hidden). Should I revert stg to  ‘receive other ..’  back off’?

        • #2447031

          It’s very unlikely that you need .NET 5 or .NET 6, which are separate from .NET Framework, so I suggest that you keep ‘Receive updates for other Microsoft products’ off, unless you have other Microsoft products that you want updated.

          See my post below for further information.

    • #2440762

      I wasn’t thrilled about the lack of ssl, the browsing to a one drive for a download ergo why I didn’t link to that tool….

      Hi Susan:

      The ASoft .NET Version Detector v21 R1 utility is also available at https://www.softpedia.com/get/System/System-Info/ASoft–NET-Version-Detector.shtml. It’s a portable utility that can be run from any location so I unzipped the netver.zip file on a removable USB thumb drive and then double-clicked the dotnet.exe file to launch.

      The interface is a bit cluttered but if you click the Copy button in the lower right corner you can paste the summary into any text editor like Notepad or MS Word. I recently copied and pasted the ASoft .NET Version Detector output for my own Win 10 Pro machine in post # 2440135 of CAS’s 13-Apr-2022 thread How to Uninstall KB5013354.

      ASoft-NET-Version-Detector-v21-Copy-Output-to-Clipboard-20-Apr-2022
      ————-
      Dell Inspiron 5584 * 64-bit Win 10 Pro v21H2 build 19044.1645 * Firefox v99.0.1 * Microsoft Defender v4.18.2203.5-1.1.19100.5 * Malwarebytes Premium v4.5.8.191-1.0.1666

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2440782

        There is a newer version, 22R1, available at ASoft .NET Version Detector product details. Be aware, that the site does not use HTTPS and may be flagged as unsafe.

        --Joe

        • #2440798

          Hi joep517:

          That why I suggested downloading the v21 R1 of ASoft .NET Version Detector (rel. 09-Dec-2021) from the secure Softpedia site. Whenever possible I download software installers from the original developer’s site, but in this case I agree with Susan Bradley that it’s not safe to do so. MajorGeeks and Softpedia are the only third-party download sites still recommended in gizmo’s Best Freeware Download Sites and as a precaution I also uploaded the netver.zip file downloaded from Softpedia and the unzipped dotnet.exe file to VirusTotal.com for analysis just to make sure they weren’t bundle with any unwanted PUPs (i.e., potentially unwanted programs like browser toolbars, adware, etc.).
          ——–
          Dell Inspiron 5584 * 64-bit Win 10 Pro v21H2 build 19044.1645 * Firefox v99.0.1 * Microsoft Defender v4.18.2203.5-1.1.19100.5 * Malwarebytes Premium v4.5.8.191-1.0.1666

    • #2440818

      … may be flagged as unsafe.

      It isn’t using Chrome v101…

    • #2446922

      I decided to turn on ‘receive updates for other products’ to see what it might offer (ie. any modules, .NET 5.0.17, .Net 6.0.5 as noted by others on the site)

      .Net updates has nothing to do with ‘updates for other products’.
      Other products could be Microsoft store apps…

      I get .Net updates with ‘receive updates for other products’ – Off.

      • #2447030

        This isn’t technically true.

        .NET Framework updates come via Windows Update (what you get regardless of your ‘Receive updates for other Microsoft products’ setting).

        .NET Core, .NET 5 and .NET 6 updates come via Microsoft Update (what you get with the ‘Receive updates for other Microsoft products’ setting turned on).

        https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/net-core-updates-coming-to-microsoft-update/

        That said, the vast majority of computers won’t have any of .NET Core, .NET 5 and .NET 6 installed, as they have to be manually installed in the first place, and for 99% of users they’re not needed, as developers using these runtimes will generally bundle them with their program instead of relying on them being installed on the machine. .NET Framework is often needed to be pre-installed, though, which is why it gets Windows Update support.

        Yes, the terminology is confusing, but it’s Microsoft so what do you expect?

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