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  • Watch out: Win10 Update Facilitation as a Service and a new push for the Update Assistant

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Watch out: Win10 Update Facilitation as a Service and a new push for the Update Assistant

    This topic contains 53 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 19 hours, 52 minutes ago.

    • Author
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    • #198521 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Nag me all you want, Microsoft, but this is getting ridiculous. All I want is an “Off” button — until you figure out how to deliver reliable patches
      [See the full post at: Watch out: Win10 Update Facilitation as a Service and a new push for the Update Assistant]

      12 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198526 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      Makes me wonder how long until “no” or “X to close” is “yes”?

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #198666 Reply

        anonymous

        MS already did that once. They switch NO to Yes and Yes To YES. They called it a bug/human(AI) error. MS can not be trusted and slowly sky has been falling for years at MS. It is time to pull the plug on MS and move to another OS that is more reliable…..MAC/UNIX/LINUX/REACTOS…Which should we chose??????? You are our only hope….

        4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198527 Reply

      anonymous

      Just noticed on the Master Patch List for Version 1703.
      Safe To Install? = Yes
      Issues Being Tracked = No Known Issues
      In light of the new malware M$ is cramming down our throats..I feel that this recommendation is iffy at best. Please feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.

      • #198529 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Suggestion:
        After the preliminary preparing/download, before you restart, Set metered connections.
        Immediately after reboot/login, delete (permanently) the C:\Windows\UdateAssistantV2 folder.

        (No guarantees. It may be too late.)

        • #198532 Reply

          anonymous

          Going To cross my fingers and roll the dice. ( not right away tho )

          Thank You 🙂

        • #198549 Reply

          JLamede
          AskWoody Lounger

          Re PKCano’s posting, I’m glad to say that my Windows does not have an Update Assistant folder. I forestalled an override of my WU disabled status last week, and monitor the situation daily, overriding the override as soon as I catch it!

    • #198530 Reply

      geekdom
      AskWoody Lounger

      Has anyone created a parallel Windows 10 GWX Control Panel program?

      Group G{ot backup} Win7|64-bit|SP1

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #198531 Reply

      dph853
      AskWoody Lounger

      I remember when updates didn’t cause people to have aneurysms. For the most part the patches worked, and most could either install or not with the “flick of a switch”.

      Now, the process is a constant white knuckle ride – Way too much reading, work and settings confirming to be enjoyable. I’m almost tempted to go back to v8.1 as that seems to never get mentioned anymore in relation to patching issues unlike v7.

      Linux just isn’t easy enough to use for the average user and it is a pain to play games intended for Windows. I don’t much like the cumulative updates as it takes extra reading to figure out what you are getting (eg. update assistant v2).

      I’m currently being held hostage paying for the equipment to run an OS that is working against me – turning my computer into an adversary rather than an ally.

      9 users thanked author for this post.
      • #198548 Reply

        anonymous

        I know this is all anecdotal but, if my 74 year old dad with no PC experience in his professional life can use Linux (Kubuntu) so can you.  He was confused by Windows 8 so, I installed Linux (Kubuntu 14.04) as a possible replacement, haven’t looked back.  He emails, browses the web, watches Netflix and uses Skype.  I don’t help him every other day due to some goofy update (except for the occasional Skype Update), strange prompt, or change making the system different.  Win-Win.

        8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #198565 Reply

        anonymous

        Linux Mint user here. I switched about five years ago and never looked back. Yes there was a learning curve, but mostly it was because I was used to doing things the Windows way. If you guys only knew all the c**p you’re put through because of Microsoft. My system just works and I can focus on other things.

        11 users thanked author for this post.
      • #198580 Reply

        HiFlyer
        AskWoody Lounger

        @dph853  Re: Ur post #198531

        “…I’m almost tempted to go back to v8.1 as that seems to never get mentioned anymore in relation to patching issues unlike v7.”

        Come on in, for now the water is fine (v8.1 with Classic Shell) until  v8.1 gets the v7sp1 M$ treatment.   Beginning Linux migration now. ✈?

         

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  HiFlyer.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #198620 Reply

          Ascaris
          AskWoody MVP

          Beginning Linux migration now.

          For those about to Linux, we salute you.  Or welcome you, at least!

          I am fairly new to Linux (been using it frequently since 2015, and as my primary OS for oh, I’m thinking it has to be about a year or so), but I’ve already learned a lot about it.  It’s not perfect, but it has one must-have feature that has been deprecated in Windows… control over one’s own computer.

          The really frustrating thing (well, one of them) is that I can tell that Windows 10 would be a really fine OS if MS would stop being ridiculous with it.  Stop trying to control my PC and dictate the terms by which I use and update it; stop with the rapid-fire feature updates; stop with the slow march toward the touch-centric UI when the vast majority of your users do not and will not be using touchscreens in Windows.  The full desktop interface is still there, so just let us use it for everything we used to in Windows 7!

          If MS did these things, Windows 10 could be really decent.  The really hard stuff about making a good OS is already done… just stop trying to be king of my desktop and deliver another OS in the mold of 7 and XP.

          Of course, we know that’s not in the cards.  MS has other plans for Windows 10 beyond simply developing and selling an OS, and there seems to be nothing we can do to convince them otherwise.  Well, okay then, MS… good thing you love Linux now, ’cause that’s where this nearly 30 year user of Windows is going.  That’s not a threat, since I already have accepted that MS is doing this intentionally.  It is what it is, and while there are areas where Windows is clearly superior to Linux, they don’t matter much if that Windows is so poisoned that anything else would look good by contrast.  I just can’t stomach the idea of having such an adversarial relationship with my OS developer, where they’re scheming new ways to override my own control over my PC (MY PC!) in order to further their own agenda.  It only adds insult to injury when they try to justify their actions in terms of helping the Windows user to have the best (whatever).  Now Biff, don’t con me!

          • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  Ascaris.
          13 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198535 Reply

      anonymous

      Perhaps some behavioral genius within MS, of course utilizing AI and the Cloud, is using W10 to socially engineer mass “Stockholm Syndrome” among W10 OS users. W10 clients will become quiet and compliant and come to view “abuse as a service” as their individual prerogatives are gradually eroded. I find it interesting that MS still charges an upfront licensing fee for W10 and then forces us all into this canard W10 as a service when the services do little other than degrade control and usability. Where do you want to go today? Hopefully, it is somewhere consistent with where MS is taking you.

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198539 Reply

      anonymous

      Dear Woody,

      We will update our Microsoft Windows operating system as we see fit in accordance with the methods and practices that we, in our sole judgment, decide will provide the best experience and in accordance with the terms of the License Agreement.

      Love,

      Microsoft

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198545 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody MVP

      All I want is an “Off” button

      FYI, the non-Microsoft Sphinx firewall software I purchased to run on all my systems can serve as an “off button”. Okay, it’s literally a checkbox, not a button in version 8.4…

      SphinxCheckbox

      Be aware that maintaining a deny-by-default firewall configuration is not trivial – though this particular package makes it easier than all the others I’ve seen – but it does give you ultimate control.

      I haven’t had an unexpected or unwanted update on any of my systems literally in years.

      -Noel

      Attachments:
      You must be logged in to view attached files.
      7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #198561 Reply

        anonymous

        @Noel
        +1 Great deny-by-default 🙂
        Do you block wu or ms from Domain Names? or can you block wu?
        What are some other good domain protection do you use (if you dont mind sharing)?
        TIA

        Back to fishing for better dreams

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #198626 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          This firewall package allows a combination of specifying an application (e.g., svchost.exe) and a zone containing a list of rules that specifically allow or block things.

          When I actually WANT to do updates, I reconfigure the svchost.exe entry from one zone that does not allow connections to Windows Update servers to another that does. This is the normal zone:

          ScreenGrab_NoelC4_2018_06_18_211301

          The zone that allows connections just has more entries and looks like this:

          ScreenGrab_NoelC4_2018_06_18_211252

          Please see this page for a summary of my security setup:

          https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/a-description-of-my-quite-effective-security-environment-long/

          -Noel

          Attachments:
          You must be logged in to view attached files.
          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #204961 Reply

        anonymous

        Not to get too political here,[…]

        Edited for content.
        Please follow the
        Lounge Rules– no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    • #198550 Reply

      GreatAndPowerfulTech
      AskWoody Lounger

      Your warnings about Windows 10 are great. I hate to see Microsoft consumer products go the way of the dodo bird, but that’s what MS is causing to happen. They know this. They plan focus service on high paying Enterprise customers with a pure Microsoft 365 subscription model, in the upcoming decade. Office 2019 will be the last stand alone version of MS Office. Linux Mint and Chromebooks are a viable alternative that won’t drive you crazy or use excessive bandwidth to download cumulative updates.

      GreatAndPowerfulTech

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198563 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger

      All I want is an “Off” button

      Found it!  Has been working well for me with Win10 Pro for almost 2 years.  🙂

      “[gpedit.msc]Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Windows Components > Windows Update > Configure Automatic Updates”

      Configure Automatic Updates

      This setting will also disable update options related to “deferral” in “Windows > Settings> Update & Security”, except for the manual “Check for updates” button.  Caution, if you do click that button, make darn sure you have wushowhide well in hand first, because you will get everything down the chute that is not hidden!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #198567 Reply

        zero2dash
        AskWoody Lounger

        This can also be done via registry on Home.
        The problem is, MS is dumping this update on machines that have WU disabled and/or the wuauserv stopped.
        The goalposts are being moved on an almost daily basis. “I have altered the deal…pray I don’t alter it further.”

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #198607 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          Yes, but this group policy has actually kept all the c**p from MS off my PC until I am actually ready for it. I don’t think it’s the same as the registry hack.

          In two years no MS updates have ever arrived by surprise.  Nothing has been forced on me without first pushing the “Check for updates” button.  I’m on 1709 now.

          My process:

          1. Take image with Macrium.

          2. Run wushowhide and hide anything I don’t want.  With Win10 it’s a c**p shoot because everything is bundled, but at least I can hold off the feature updates as long as I want.

          3. Push the button after Woody gives the all clear, I usually let the monthly updates install, unless there are known issues.

      • #198638 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody MVP

        My VM is set that way.

        So what does this part I’ve marked in red of the Windows Update page in Settings mean in light of that policy?

        Settings

        -Noel

        Attachments:
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        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #198569 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody MVP

      This update is not really as much harmful as KB4023814 & KB4023057
      it seems just a helper for KB4023057

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #198573 Reply

      bobcat5536
      AskWoody Lounger

      Windows 10 Pro….Just did install the June updates. As soon as they were installed and as soon as the desktop showed after restarting, I killed my internet connection. First thing I noticed, was there is no more Update Assistant listed in the Programs and Features list like before. I deleted it from the C/Windows directory and then restored my internet connection and checked for any more updates. Stated everything was up to date. As far as changing or resetting any settings pertaining to windows update ( Group Policy, Windows Update Blocker, Etc ), everything was left unchanged. I think I was able to get rid of it before it could cause any grief, simply by killing the internet connection to keep it from phoning home. So far everything is working okay and no problems. If anything changes, I’ll post back.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #198634 Reply

        RamRod
        AskWoody Lounger

        You might want to set your alarm for 12:55 a.m. MS added several tasks related to the Self Healing Server that activated at 1:00 a.m. every night until the update was complete. Thank goodness I was up late that night and caught it. Didn’t recognize what was going on until the second night. Check Task Scheduler for windows tasks related to the self healing server.

    • #198610 Reply

      anonymous

      When maintenance of the tool that you use to accomplish some tasks, consumes more of your time and energy than you spend on and with the actual task, the tool probably is a lousy one.

      Use another tool instead. Worse than Windows none of the alternatives can get.

      Its not just the carricature of “updating” that Microsoft runs as a running joke since years now. Its the lacking stability and reliability of Windows, too. This garbage in the  6 months I use it on a secondary rig gives me more BSOD and technical issues than 98SE and XP in all their years together. Thank goodness I only use it for a race sim, not professionally. All my other tasks and professional tasks are running on another system, under Linux.

      >> The only reasonable way to run Windows 10 is – not to run it. <<

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198614 Reply

      samak
      AskWoody Lounger

      “All I want is an “Off” button — until you figure out how to deliver reliable patches and upgrades.”

      Surely you want an “Off” button whether or not they figure out how to deliver reliable patches and upgrades, to retain control of the upgrades.

      W7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit, Office 2010, Group B, non-techie

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #198651 Reply

        anonymous

        Maybe it should read:

        “All I want is an “Off” button, to use until you figure out how to deliver reliable patches and upgrades.”

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #198615 Reply

      anonymous

      Next stop: Group W.

      I may or may not get malware if I don’t patch, but it seems I’m definitely going to get malware from Microsoft if I do.

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198632 Reply

      Zaphyrus
      AskWoody Lounger

      it never ceases to amaze me how Microsoft likes to waste its time making unnecesary software instead of improving and testing its updates…

      If they were tested and improved even Mr.Woody and Miss.Susan would encourage us to update right away.

      Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #198654 Reply

        James Bond 007
        AskWoody Lounger

        It never ceases to amaze me how Microsoft likes to waste its time making unnecessary software instead of improving and testing its updates… If they were tested and improved even Mr.Woody and Miss.Susan would encourage us to update right away.

        If Microsoft “suddenly wants” to improve and test its updates better, I don’t think it will be able to maintain its schedule of two Windows 10 “feature updates” each year as resources will have to be diverted since it no longer has a test department. It will have to reduce the frequency of these useless “features updates” to once per year or even longer. I don’t think Microsoft (and Nadella) wants to do that.

        Since it is obvious that Microsoft will keep to its twice-a-year schedule, we can’t expect it to “improve and test” its updates. In fact, it seems to me that it purposely does as little testing as possible and delegate those so-called testing to “insiders” and “home users”. How can the updates not be problematic due to these policies?

        As a PC user who is staying away from the Windows 10 fiasco (apart from a single machine on which Windows 10 LTSB is installed for testing purposes), Windows 10 seems to me to be more and more ridiculous by the day. I have been of the opinion that there is no point in using it at all at this time (well, at least the “Home” and “Pro” versions) since its release nearly 3 years ago, and Microsoft has done nothing to change my opinion in these 3 years. The LTSB is the only version of Windows 10 that I consider worthy of using, and it is still worse than Windows 7 and 8.1.

        Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  James Bond 007. Reason: Correction
        5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198633 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’m curious: If MS claimed that ” “our Update Assistant” is helpful to users “, would that be an oxymoron wrapped around another oxymoron?

       

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  OscarCP.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198659 Reply

      jescott418
      AskWoody Lounger

      Nothing Microsoft does in terms of forcing updates and upgrades surprises me anymore. They seem intent and giving end users no choice in accepting updates and upgrades and anyone who tries to stop them will eventually be defeated. If Microsoft would only expend its energy making sure these updates were properly vetted rather then creating ways to force them onto devices before they are.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198725 Reply

      bosun1
      AskWoody Lounger

      Multi-boot.  Win7 Pro, Win 10 Pro, Mint, Ubuntu.

      I primarily use my computer for surfing and e-mail.  And looking for aliens, blackholes, and genetic work (BOINC).  Occasional games.  Haven’t fired up the WinX partition in a few months because we all know why.

      Getting serious about Linux finally.  Migrated my bookmarks, typing in passwords by hand (massive pain in the neck), and set up e-mail.  If I want to play a game, just boot up Win 7 with the internet connection disabled.

      Have a nice day MicroSoft!

       

      • #198830 Reply

        anonymous

        I have a Dual Boot Win 7 Pro x64 and Linux Mint 18.3 and use KeePass2 for password management.  My KeePass database file  *.kdbx  transfers between Windows and Linux Mint very easily.  You may want to give it a try.  Available in LM Software Manager Depository.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #198754 Reply

      anonymous

      I’d call this malware-behavior. How long before a decent virusscanner detects Windows 10 as a genuine virus and put the whole mess in quarantaine…?

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #199358 Reply

      ve2mrx
      AskWoody Lounger

      Idea: Woody and Susan could set up a WSUS server and we could subscribe to it!

      It seems to me they both have the knowledge to run it, and this way most M$ nasties would not even try to load?

      Also, when the DefCon changes, they would flip the updates to on at the same time ☺️

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #199531 Reply

      dph853
      AskWoody Lounger

      You learn something new everyday…

       

      If you are diligent and delete the updateassistantv2 directory and the included updateassistant.exe and subsequently run SFC /scannow , guess what gets put back in your windows directory?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #199545 Reply

        ve2mrx
        AskWoody Lounger

        What I would try :

        1. Delete the files but leave the directory in place
        2. Remove all rights but mine on the (now empty) directory.
        3. Enjoy!

        Also works with malware to prevent run on boot stuff from running with Admin rights, giving you time to delete it. If the system cannot read it, Goodbye!

        Martin

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #199572 Reply

          HiFlyer
          AskWoody Lounger

          What I would try :

          1. Delete the files but leave the directory in place
          2. Remove all rights but mine on the (now empty) directory.
          3. Enjoy!

          Also works with malware to prevent run on boot stuff from running with Admin rights, giving you time to delete it. If the system cannot read it, Goodbye! Martin

          I don’t understand.  Please elaborate.  What “Also works with malware”?

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #199573 Reply

            ve2mrx
            AskWoody Lounger

            In many cases, malware runs using some system level rights. Removing those rights from the folder prevents the system to access the malware, thus preventing it from running on boot. After removing the rights, kill the malware processes, check the rights again, fix as needed, reboot. Then you can delete the malware. Or the Update Assistant!

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #199603 Reply

              HiFlyer
              AskWoody Lounger

              @ve2mrx #199573

              Is the ‘updateassistantv2 directory’ the only one which needs these changes?

               

               

            • #199648 Reply

              ve2mrx
              AskWoody Lounger

              I don’t know, I don’t run Windows 10 often, I still hang on to Windows 7 for my machines!

              With all the malware-like behaviour of Microsoft since the release of Windows 10, the trust is broken and I consider everything Windows 10 malware with a built-in OS.

              Thankfully, the Lenovo machine I earned had support for Windows 7, which was quickly installed. Windows 10 is dormant on another partition.

              Martin

              2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #201979 Reply

      anonymous

      Another twist to the Windows 10 update fiascos, I develop music software and 40% of my customers are on Windows, so I have a dual boot MacPro so I can run windows. Windows 10  went and auto updated itself until it would no longer boot. I phone Micro$oft tech support to help, they told me it as an Apple issue and wouldn’t help me.

      After two days of pain re-installing my entire operating system and software development tools and environment I have learned the hard way to never run windows unatended, and only ever use a wired network connection so I can quickly pull the cable out, like I had to do today, when I notice Windows trying to update itself even though I have told it not to. My machine has booted and run fine every day since blocking updates.

      • #202088 Reply

        anonymous

        Dual boot is a bad idea nowadays, partly indeed because of those pesky pushed updates. Better run Windows in VMWare or something similar as a virtual machine. Has the extra advantage that you can easily make regular backups. If something goes wrong, just copy the earlier VM back and you’re back in business. Much better then trusting Microsoft with their chaotic OS. And btw, don’t worry about impact on performance. A virtual machine nowadays is similar in speed as running it on real hardware. Virtualization also gives you a good protection against Windows-malware etc. If it goes wrong in that area -once again – copy back a clean VM of an earlier date. Piece of cake.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #202110 Reply

          anonymous

          Make sure that you keep a backup copy of your VM on external media (i.e. not connected to your PC/Mac). I’ve read about malware that specifically corrupts virtual machines.

          Anecdotally, my W10 Pro 1703 VM has run flawlessly since I totally isolated it from our network.
          -lehnerus2000

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #201994 Reply

      JLamede
      AskWoody Lounger

      Yup! Microsoft has been particularly aggressive in overriding  disabled WU this past week. I check it every morning, and have had to override the override, restoring the ‘disabled’ setting three times. Because I’ve also then deleted the relevant files from Windows/Software Distribution each time, I’ve avoided the worst and, miraculously, my Windows (because I’ve left the logs in place) now thinks I’m up to date! As for blaming Apple, or next door’s dog or anyone except themselves, this is MS’s standard answer now. The’ve blown their old basic marketing policy of being compatible with most hardware to bits.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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