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  • What are your favorite Mac apps?

    Posted on Nathan Parker Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Philomene123 1 month ago.

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    • #1874843 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I’m testing a handful of Mac apps, plus I’m putting Apple News+ through the paces, and I will have some reviews of those apps and Apple News+ coming up.

      While I give myself a chance to refresh and get some more regular Mac-related advice fresh in my mind to return to writing a weekly column on here, I wanted to take a moment to give other AskWoody Mac users a chance to chime in.

      What are some of your favorite Mac apps, and why are they your favorites?

      Next Saturday I will return to my regularly-scheduled column with a full review on Apple News+, but in the moment, it’ll be fun to hear from other AskWoody members on favorite Mac apps.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1875494 Reply

      Philomene123
      AskWoody Plus

      Salutations from Quebec, Canada! On my macbook pro. i have 2 nice apps. I use almost daily. Coconut, to keep an eye on my battery. I was not lucky and had to bring that device to Apple to change the battery (due the recent recall)  but I  noticed the battery was always very hot, since day 1, so I searched for an app to check the temperature, and view the cycles count. Pretty useful.

      The other one seems not to be available anymore on Apple store, it is whoisonmywifi. Also useful to monitoring my wifi network.  I have a secure wifi (I hope so) but I am in a location with many networks around me, so I am a bit paranoid!  The app. scans every 5 minutes, and I have warnings if a foreign device is detected. i can see the mac. addresses, so I can identify every device, or not.

      On my imac, I have only one app. a tool to  edit images. Paint x lite. I use the free edition, but I will probably upgrade it in a near future.

      I have more apps on my apple mini. I personally think that the Apple store is more secure than the google play store.  So I installed many funny tools. In fact, I think the Apple environment is more secure than Windows. I am done with Windows. I kept a laptop on w10 to tests purpose. It’s an old asus rog, and not sure it can be put on the latest version, 1903.

      The only complain I can make is Apple devices are very far too expensive for their specifications.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1875948 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Thanks for the app suggestions! The Mac App Store is generally more secure (although I’ve found a couple of nefarious apps sneak through). Macs are generally more secure than Windows PC’s, although I have some other Mac Security tips on here. I’m simply not Windows compatible. Tried it and it didn’t work for me.

      I’m checking out Affinity Photo which you might like for image editing. I also use Pixelmator Pro which is a solid Photoshop replacement for those who don’t want an Adobe subscription.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1875978 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        Macs are generally more secure than Windows PC’s, although I have some other Mac Security tips on here.

        They are indeed, as are Linux PCs.  There’s some benefit in being on a platform with less market share… the malware writers are mostly going to target the big guy.  If it takes as much effort to write a Mac or Linux malware program as it does a Windows malware program, but the Windows program has a much greater number of potential victims, you get more bang for the buck.

        If you’ve been aware of the whole controversy regarding vaccinations, you know there’s something called herd immunity.  When nearly all members of a group are immune to a given threat, the remaining members are protected by virtue of the immunity of others.  If you’re not immune to the measles but nearly everyone around you is, the odds of someone transmitting the measles to you is greatly diminished, since everyone you meet is most likely themselves immune.

        That same effect exists for computers.  If someone wrote a MacOS malware, about 90% of computers would be immune right off the bat (because they do not run MacOS).  As soon as that malware vectored into one of those 90%, it would be dead in its tracks.  If a Mac user had 20 people in his address book, and only one of those had a Mac, a worm that emailed itself to everyone in the address book would only have one potential victim, even if the malware was completely unknown to any malware researcher.

        By contrast, a Windows worm would look at the address book containing the email addresses of many more Windows users and find lots of potential victims.  Of course, any of those would-be victims could end the threat by not opening unsolicited email attachments and the usual things, but the odds of finding someone who would is much greater when there are many more vulnerable potential victims.

        That’s pretending that there are no people who read email on smart phones, of course, and that’s definitely not true, but there will still be more Windows users in a given address book than Mac or Linux users, on average.

        A lot of people have claimed over the years that Windows is a security nightmare because Microsoft doesn’t know or care much about security, but I don’t think that’s true.  Linux (as a desktop OS) or MacOS have never been tested to the degree that Windows has.  That doesn’t make the protection any less real, though!

         

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.4).

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    • #1875981 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      The other one seems not to be available anymore on Apple store, it is whoisonmywifi.

      You can find the app with new name : whofi
      https://www.pcmag.com/feature/362092/how-to-see-who-s-on-your-wi-fi/1

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1876730 Reply

        Philomene123
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks for the link about the new who is on my wifi version!  I bookmarked it 🙂

    • #1876041 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I use a few applications designed or adapted for macOS: ClipGrab for downloading and saving music videos from YouTube, Boom 2 for adjusting the frequency response of the sound system in my MacBook Pro laptop, Activity Monitor to see what is going on inside the Mac, Adblock Plus to save myself a lot of unpleasantness, Waterfox as my default browser. I am quite satisfied with all  of them. I should also include in this list the built-in software of TexEdit and Terminal; I use each as much or more than any other application.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1876228 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I should also include in this list the built-in software of TexEdit and Terminal

      Thanks for your list! In addition to TextEdit, have you tried BBEdit yet? I’m taking the trial of the pro version now and plan to review it coming up.

      Nathan Parker

      • #1876307 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        BBEdit is probably a good choice for programmers and Web page developers. However, I do not do Web pages and, as far as coding goes, I am a vi/vim man from way back, and I still find these adequate for what I do, although I will not deny that there are more convenient editors. Maybe I am one of those people that like to suffer doing everything the hard way — so then they can brag about it to all and sundry? Well, no, not really: vi it’s not that bad.

        And while at it, I would like to put here a good word for “Preview”: it is a basic Swiss knife kind of document viewer and image file editor that I find is a very, very practical thing to have. It comes bundled with macOS, so one does not need to go looking any further to have it at one’s disposal.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1876310 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I haven’t done much with vi but a little, but it is a neat command-line word processor. BBEdit has been interesting so far in my tests.

      Preview is excellent. I don’t use Adobe at all. Preview does what I need for viewing PDF’s without the bloat. The only other PDF viewer I use is PDF Expert when I need to edit or markup a PDF (some I can do in Preview as well, but PDF Expert has a few more tools). PDF Expert has some great features (more coming), and no $$$ subscription from Adobe.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.

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