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  • What’s your feedback for Windows 11?

    Home Forums AskWoody blog What’s your feedback for Windows 11?

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      • #2372788
        Susan Bradley
        Manager

        In Computerworld this week I started my list of feedback for Windows 11.  Before we get to the next version of Windows, I have a list of things that n
        [See the full post at: What’s your feedback for Windows 11?]

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2372800
        ENShearin
        AskWoody Plus

        The most helpful change would be an attitude adjustment. If Microsoft wants to see Windows as a service, perhaps they could start behaving like a service organization? At a minimum, a service attitude would include attributes like transparency and responsivity, not to mention responsibility. I’m sure others could lengthen this list considerably.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2372808
        Seff
        AskWoody Plus

        I would like a reversion to the Windows updating settings used in Windows  7, so complete choice is available over whether to update and when – none of the “click on ‘check for updates’ and it installs them without telling you what they are and asking if you want them” or “we’ll tell you how long you can pause things for then it’s going to happen regardless” nonsense. It wouldn’t go amiss to return to occasional service packs coupled with critical-only security patches when needed but without the monthly Russian Roulette that we all play on Patch Tuesdays not to mention the twice-yearly “feature” updates.

        Doubtless there are lots of other similar things, but the essence of my views as a home user with two desktops is that I just want an operating system that allows me run my computers consistently and reliably with the operating system running unobtrusively in the background while I remain in charge of my machines.  I’d be perfectly happy for this to be based on the old principle of my buying the initial Windows 11 box  with the resulting revenue stream allowing Microsoft to revert to some decent internal testing.

        I’d be even happier if any new version of Windows dropped the “one size fits all” approach and recognised that hand-held devices and desk-based devices have different operating system/UI requirements.

      • #2372811
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        Susan, the following sentence in your CW post caught my eye:

        I’m also starting to see pushback that too much private information collected with telemetry is being shared to vendors.

        Where have you seen this kind of pushback, and what private information is being said to be shared with what kinds of vendors?

        Thanks for the details!

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2372814
        anonymous
        Guest

        Feedback for Windows 11… Where to start? To begin; is any feedback useful in the first place? Like there are a tremendous amount of wishes out there and I don’t think Microsoft ever delved into them. So what’s the use of feedback? Ok, lets pretend Microsoft actually listens to their customers. I would like to see some fundamental changes.

        Number one: One Windows. No Home, Pro, Workstation or whatever sub-version you can come up with. Just one is enough.

        Two: separate the system from applications. System should be read-only. No messing about.

        Three: separate the GUI from System. Core-windows does it to a certain extent. Now separate it all the way.

        Four: come up with an understandable permission system with logical inheritance. No two columns with ‘allow’ and ‘deny’. Just one column. Checked = allow, unchecked = denied. And for inheritance – a checked permission is inherited upwards , where  you can uncheck a permission to stop it from that point on.

        Simon

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2373076
          Ascaris
          AskWoody MVP

          Two: separate the system from applications. System should be read-only. No messing about.

          The system can’t be read only. The system itself is constantly writing to system-owned directories for one reason or another, from updates to configuration (registry and otherwise) to swap/pagefiles.

          If you mean denying write permission to the user, you can do that too. I haven’t tried a pure user account in Windows since XP, but that sounds like what you are looking for. Not everyone is looking for a “hands off” kind of thing, though. That would be a deal-breaker for a lot of us.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.3 User Edition)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2372815
        anonymous
        Guest

        Wholeheartedly agree about options to setup Windows without a Microsoft account. Don’t have one now, and don’t want one. Unfortunately, it appears from what I’ve read about Windows 11, a MS account will be REQUIRED for those on the home edition and the only way to avoid one is to pay for an upgrade to the Pro version.

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2372833
        anonymous
        Guest

        I will keep it to only ten items but I have over 100 things that need to be fix with Windows 10 and future Windows 11 from the leak source code with the iso on internet.

        1. Fix the 54 current remote hacks to obtain Admin Rights in Windows 10
        2. Fix remote exploits that is impacted by MS backdoor telemetry services that allows  anyone to listen and obtain data from users that have MS accounts as log on in computer. Currently not working on local account only.
        3. Fix  telemetry by remove it or give a people option to use it or not
        4. Stop Windows update cycle. Focus on bugs and issues rather than release features every SemiAnnual Channel. Make feature updates every 5 years….anyone that was feature updates sooner…sign up for Insider Windows or have two groups–Normal users and the feature starved users. Normal users do not need new features. They need things to work out of the box for next 5 years without being broken by MS features.
        5. Remove Settings and bring back Control Panel
        6. Remove Start Menu and Bring back normal Windows 7 Start menu
        7. Reduce Windows 10 back to needing only 300MB space like Windows Xp or 1GB like Windows 7. Windows 10 takes over 16GB now a data of useless data.
        8. Reduce Windows 10 need 32 GB to run normally back to 4GB or less.
        9. Fix the Shut Down to shut down rather than hybrid all data from RAM to hard drive for faster booting. (This is causing several exploit maleware to live in RAM and never being cleared. Some have still not be caught by current antivirus programs for last 3 years now)
        10. Get Windows 11 run from a 1GB USB stick. Windows Portable will use about 600MB and other will be for files user needs. This will allow for fix computers easier when Windows Updates mess it up and keep user active until can fix issue.
        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2372836
        Moonshine
        AskWoody Lounger

        Remove Settings and bring back Control Panel

        Out of interest, what version of Windows 11 have you been testing?
        I’m using W11 Dev Build 21996.1 and it hasn’t lost the Control Panel yet.
        It will go eventually, but not in the version I have and the version that most are using.
        It’s worth reminding folks that some say this is the finished W11 that will be released, but in reality, things ‘may’ change in that release version.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2372848
        anonymous
        Guest

        The newest leak version of Windows 11 is:
        W11 Dev Build 21998.3

        • #2372851
          Susan Bradley
          Manager

          So I’m more concerned that there is clearly a leak in some development servers somewhere.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2372876
            anonymous
            Guest

            Nope. According to some posts, these leaks ISO of Windows 11 and source code are from the SolarWind hack. Others are saying that they are on a public server in MS.

      • #2372853
        Moonshine
        AskWoody Lounger

        . . . . there is clearly a leak in some development servers somewhere.

        Many folks are saying that Microsoft themselves are purposely leaking the Dev builds to just to get feedback.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2373112
          anonymous
          Guest

          Just my opinion. I believe Microsoft leaked this on purpose to see if it would excite users to want to move away from 10 and to get better data than what insiders are providing. I have already upgraded after testing and virus scanning and have found 11 to be way better than 10. I’m moving on. After all it must be free. The upgrade is activated from win 10. I have longed for a better windows and this is it.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2373453
            Simon_Weel
            AskWoody Plus

            Or the boiling frog tactics. Get all (negative) feedback upfront, so the actual launch will be a smooth operation.

      • #2372881
        anonymous
        Guest

        A good operating system should be like a good umpire or referee: you don’t notice them when they do a good job. When was the last time you didn’t notice Win10? Sadly I expect more of the same with 11 which is an OS that I didn’t know we needed.

        But as Susan asked, at the top of my wishlist for 11 is that patches don’t break my PC.  Spend less money on the dev team for things like News and Interests, and more on a team that tests the updates. I’m not seeing a check from Microsoft, so I don’t want to be one of people that is forced to test the fixes each month.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2372897
          b
          AskWoody MVP

          When was the last time you didn’t notice Win10?

          Today.

          Windows 10 Pro version 21H2 build 19044.1149 + Microsoft 365 (group ASAP)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2372890
        anonymous
        Guest

        A more transparent attitude. Accountability and a willingness to step up when they screw up. Internal Testing. The Insider program doesn’t work. It’s not the fault of the insiders, they are just not trained to be testers. And definitely a MASSIVE reduction in telemetry. The ability to remove bloat at installation time, and to remove or at the very least disable system components that we don;t want to use (defender, edge, cloudexperience host, advertising, system restore, file history, and so on). More control over patching.  Less time on the dressing and more time on stability and performance. But most of all, a massive change in attitude. Microsoft is deceptive and irresponsible. They need to be more transparent – Did I say that already 🙂

        One last thing – stop with the forced installation of garbage we don’t want. Nothing should be installed – ever – without informed consent. If I don’t want it – don’t install it.

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2372924
        tbsky
        AskWoody Lounger

        is windows 11 the same thing as win10 21H2? if that’s true, I hope MS can do string search/replace better this time. I still see windows 2016 string in windows 2019 nowadays.

         

      • #2373051
        GreatAndPowerfulTech
        AskWoody Lounger

        We all want something that we’re not going to get out of Microsoft and Windows. There is no way other than to invest billions in the company’s stock to get heard. With that much invested, I suspect that the desire to change the way things are done may be reconsidered, due to the risk of losing investment value. If I want to control my OS these days, I’ll use a Linux distro. However, I see no reason to not use Windows as long as it doesn’t bork my machines more than it has in the past, in which case I simply restore my latest drive image and file backups. It happens. Just not that often that I hate the OS. It’s too versatile to really hate it, in spite of the dozens of (mostly minor) annoyances.

        GreatAndPowerfulTech

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373079
        anonymous
        Guest

        Suppose you purchased three new computers from a company like Dell or HP that partners with Microsoft to sell their computers with Windows 10 already pre-installed on the SSD or hard drive at the beginning of this year or the end of last year, thinking as Microsoft has said that Windows 10 is the last OS to be released by them, just getting upgrades to the OS twice a year? You just spent $3,300.00 USD for three new computers that suddenly no longer have the latest Windows OS. Wouldn’t you have waited until this Summer to purchase those machines if you had known or suspected that Microsoft would be releasing a new OS, Windows 11, in 2021? Did Dell or HP know back on January 1, 2021 that Microsoft was planning on releasing a new OS to replace Windows 10 later in 2021 and they just kept their little secret from their customers? How much more cash will those customers now have to fork over because they were misled in order to get the latest OS from Microsoft or Dell or HP for their brand new shiny computers?

         

        • #2373085
          PKCano
          Manager

          I find it highly unlikely that Microsoft will charge for an upgrade from Win10 to Win11.

          Or, for that matter, for an upgrade from Win7/8.1 to Win11, if past history means anything.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373090
        anonymous
        Guest

        Long time since I posted here, but in this case, let’s go with the usual list that MS doesn’t care about:

        1. Return to the old Windows 7 style updates. Allowing users to check for updates without risking to have any automatically install, and having a disable automatic updates setting that if selected ensures that no update will be automatically installed no matter what, is absolutely mandatory, but being able to pick and choose individual patches is the actual target. Can of course still have the bundles for all the users who just want to get it over with and don’t care, but let the rest of us do it our way, and make sure that updating will never interfere, and that any update we don’t want, for whatever reason, we can skip, even permanently.
        2. Ensure that there are clear ways to check and, if desired, disable any automatic behaviors / tasks, so system resources will only be used for what the user desires them to be used. Incidentally, this eliminates the need for a separate telemetry point, since it means it must be easy to completely disable its gathering, purely from a system resource use point of view, though of course those who may for some reason still want to allow it to be gathered but control what of it is sent should also have that option.
        3. Ensure that changes made by users, by whatever means, be it clear settings, registry edits, group policy or whatever else, are not changed by the operating system, be it after updates or at any other point. If such a change would really conflict with an update, as in truly creating unavoidable problems, not just MS saying it might or coding the update in such a manner as to create them when it could have been avoided, there should be a warning, allowing the user to choose between keeping the setting and installing the update.
        4. Bring back the version support and updating timeline as it was, no stream of feature updates but release a version of Windows that gets 5-7 years of mainstream support,  during which time there will be 1-3 major updates, as in the Service Packs, that are not forced on the user, and other minor and entirely optional feature updates among the monthly patches, plus 5-7 more years of extended support, with security updates only.
        5. Ensure that all local functions work properly without connections to the Internet, which obviously also means a Microsoft account shouldn’t be required for anything done on your own computer, and users shouldn’t be tricked or pressured into logging on that way.
        6. Bring back the Windows 7 start menu.
        7. Give users a wide range of install options and explain them properly, so the operating system will be as close to the desired state right away, without undesired components and behaviors. This would also imply more customization options, and MS stopping this unifying policy and remembering that users are individuals with individual preferences even on similar devices, not to mention that different types of devices may be better suited for entirely different settings. And it also relates to the system requirements and resource use, allowing users to choose between lightweight and flashy eye candy and anything in between. And obviously also means things like the Store or ads or other such “features” can never be installed at all, though admittedly it does seem fair for this to be a feature reserved for actual paid licenses.

        Would have more, and maybe something major slipped my mind now, but I’m getting tired of writing this…

        — Cavalary

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2373113
          anonymous
          Guest

          I agree with you 110%, especially on no. 2. But you’ve hit the bullseye on every point, in my opinion.        Doug N

           

      • #2373097
        anonymous
        Guest

        Ordinary users shouldn’t have to be scared every time MacroHard releases some new “features”/updates aka marketing scheme…

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373110
        Moonshine
        AskWoody Lounger

        Bring back the Windows 7 start menu

        Instead of being selfish and trying to impose the dated W7 Start Menu on everyone, why don’t you use a 3rd party utility such as Open-Shell (formerly Classic-Shell) to take ‘you’ back in time and get your own W7 ‘style’ Start Menu.
        If folks don’t know, the ‘new’ style Start Menu in W11 can be reverted to the W10 Start Menu with a simple setting change should users want that option.

        • #2373129
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          I actually prefer the Win 95, 98, and XP Classic Start Menu. They’re much easier to use in my opinion.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2373132
          Ascaris
          AskWoody MVP

          Susan asked for people’s feedback, and anonymous gave his/her feedback. It’s an opinion, just like yours. Nothing about “bring back the Windows 7 start menu” implies “imposing” it on anyone. Anonymous did not suggest that the tiled Windows 10 menu or its Windows 11 successor should be removed, or that anyone who didn’t like it should go get an aftermarket program rather than having MS provide the choice.

          There is a annoying trend for software developers to have this idea that “good” software will have as few options as possible, with the premise being that options are only there to allow users to work around the developer’s mistakes. Options, to them, are a sign that they didn’t get the design right, an admission of failure. That notion presupposes that there’s a single “right” way of doing things that is optimal (and unquestionably so) for all people, which is absurd.

          One size has never fit all. Which start menu design, for example, is the “right” one? I like the Windows Classic cascading menu from the Win 95 through 2000 era, and the menu design I have chosen for my own use is very much in line with what that would likely have become if MS kept evolving it. Anonymous likes the Win 7 menu, and clearly you prefer either the 10 or 11 menu. Which of us three is correct? If there’s one truly “right” answer, only one of us can be (and perhaps none of us are, and the correct design isn’t any of those three).

          Good UI design doesn’t get “dated.” If it worked in the first place, it was because it meshed with the way that humans process information, and that hasn’t changed since long before computers existed. Styling fads and aesthetics may work with clothing fashion and automotive model year changes, but they don’t belong in UI design. If there are genuine advances to be made, by all means, make them, but if the only reason to change UI elements is that they look “dated” in some people’s opinions, it’s probably better left alone, if that’s all anyone can come up with that is wrong about it. I am sure the automotive pattern of a steering wheel and pedals for the brakes and the throttle (and clutch in the more entertaining models) must have seemed dated to some, but it’s a pattern that has stuck for decade after decade, with each exciting new model having the same old user interface as ever.

           

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.3 User Edition)

          7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373124
        anonymous
        Guest

        Major suggestions

        1. Bring back in house testing. Insiders aren’t providing enough data.
        2. Bring back Windows 7 functionality.
        3. Get rid of telemetry. Spelling?
        4. No more MS acct.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373140
        LoneWolf
        AskWoody Plus

        I have an easy one that has irked me since Day one.

        When setting default apps by file type…

        Why do I have to scroll through the entire list of file extensions?

        Why can’t I search for my extension with a search box? Why can’t I hit the P key to be taken to the P extensions so I can get to PDF more easily?  Did Microsoft just give up and say “Tough luck, sort through the thousand extensions on your own? It sure seems like it.

        This seems like a ridiculously simple thing in the scheme of things to fix, and yet we’ve seen multiple Windows releases and nobody said “We should make this better”?

        We are SysAdmins.
        We walk in the wiring closets no others will enter.
        We stand on the bridge, and no malware may pass.
        We engage in tech support, we do not retreat.
        We live for the LAN.
        We die for the LAN.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2373149
          b
          AskWoody MVP

          A search box should be in the next version, as Insiders have had one for a year:

          Over the years, we’ve made a number of improvements to Settings based on your feedback, and we’re happy to share the next one is starting to roll out. We’re adding the ability to search the lists of file types, protocols, and apps when setting a default.

          Showing the Choose default apps by file type Settings window, now with a search box.

          Improving your default apps experience

          (But I told you that five months ago 😉)

          Windows 10 Pro version 21H2 build 19044.1149 + Microsoft 365 (group ASAP)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2373152
        anonymous
        Guest

        Some of these have been mentioned by others it seems but this is my list. MS will ignore it as well.

        1. Have MS listen to customer feedback rather than just ignore it
        2. If MS does the first, than we can start giving feedback otherwise all are useless.
        3. Bring back normal copy and move fuction. Currently Windows 10 can not copy or move files that are with the same name. Windows 7 just added text to it and copied and move it. Now Windows 10 has user compare files before allowing. This works for small files 10-20. But when working with 1000 -4000 files, comparing is useless. Just move the files or copy them.
        4. Stop Windows new features and go back to 5-6 years cycle with 1 major service package.
        5. Stop telemetry data
        6. Make updates keep setting rather than turn everything back to original defaults
        7. No force updates.
        8. Hire internal testers that know what that needs.(IE actually test anything before it is release and hoping it does not break things.)
        9. Bring back Bill Gates. Things were better when he ran things.
        10. Bring back Windows 7 functionality.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373155
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        I haven’t upgraded to it, so I can’t have any feedback, yet.  And I don’t have a wish list.

        Whatever feedback I might have after upgrading will depend on what adjustments I need to make to the OS to make it as equally well-behaved as my Windows 10 Pro, but that is still months away.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

      • #2373181
        anonymous
        Guest

        So will Windows 11 mark the end of Windows 10 feature updates and will 10 become more stable and less of a rolling release once windows 11 appears? So If one remains on 10 then that’s going to get some manner of security updates until 2025. But I’d welcome less disruptions from windows 10 and less new features top worry about. I’m still currently on 10/1909 Home and am not using 10 online currently until I see what going to happen after 11 arrives. If I where to allow 10/1909 online what Feature Update will I be offered and really for my newest Laptop I’m dual Booting 10 with Linux Mint 20.1 and most of the time booted into Mint 20.1.

      • #2373197

        Lotsa territory covered by all here, I can only add a few:

        1. Give me back the control I have on Win 7
        2. Drop this SaaS nonsense for an OS
        3. …and stop outsourcing your tech support offshore, especially to firms that can’t handle the job. I’m looking at you, “Mindtree”.

        (Maybe that’s why all those “minds” are lying in squishy piles around the “Tree”…<sfx:object whistling thru air, hits ground with “splotz”.>

        Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit ESU, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", 12GB RAM, Group "0Patch", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations. Linux Mint Greenhorn
        --
        "Civilization is fun! Anyway, it sure keeps me busy["

        -Zippy

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373199
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        If I where to allow 10/1909 online what Feature Update will I be offered

        1909 is EOL so chances are you will be offered 21H1 to which you can update automatically using TVR.

      • #2373216
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Lot have been said here. The best I can sympathize with is the name of Susan Bradley’s article name at Computerworld:
        Before we get Windows 11, can Microsoft fix Windows 10?

        Whats the point od having two unreliable and overly demanding “operating systems”? I think the outcome from the IT community is clear: people are upset and tired of neverending update madness. Its so unnescessary.

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 20H2 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373220
        NoLoki
        AskWoody Lounger

        Does Microsoft actually have any interest in feedback from Home users?  – Nope!

        Pro users, being non-business or small and medium sized businesses have no sway with MS either. Feedback from this group is of no consequence to MS.

        There are over 1 billion W10 users, most of whom are Enterprise subscribers – they pay for the ‘privilege’. They have gatekeepers who give MS feedback on a regular basis. They have sway but have learned that MS is like a massive aircraft carrier on a mission  (heavily armed,  on course and with one mindset – might makes right).

        W11 will get a new look and no doubt dressed to kill, however W10 will be underneath with all its warts. Feedback is for ‘window’ dressing.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373342
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I have already commented here #2373305  on this after today’s announcement made by MS on Windows 11, and in my comment the conclusion is:

        “So this seems to be a 99.9999% consumers mass-market product. For doing also serious computer work using a PC as a proper work-station (the way Windows used to be in what it now feels like several generations of computers — and of people — ago), well … not so much, as far as I can see, except for making the use of “Teams” for setting up and, or attending virtual meetings easier (maybe) than otherwise.”

        “There is, for now, a Mac running macOS in my present and a PC running Linux, and only Linux, in my future.”

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373379
        TJ
        AskWoody Plus

        It took me 5 years to get over the squarish Windows 10 ui and finally upgrade from Windows 7, but now I got so used to it that I wouldn’t want to change it for Windows 11’s rounded corners. Hope there will be a setting to change that, or it will take me another 5 years to get used to.

        On the more important side: MS should build in a Mint style Update Manager, that gives the user the choice to install an update or not, see what it’s for and whether it has been tested or not, and how urgently it should be applied.

        + tabs in Explorer!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2373441
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Windows 11 Feature deprecations and removals

        When upgrading to Windows 11 from Windows 10 or when installing an update to Windows 11, some features may be deprecated or removed. Please see below for information regarding some of the key features impacted:

        Cortana will no longer be included in the first boot experience or pinned to the Taskbar.
        Desktop wallpaper cannot be roamed to or from device when signed in with a Microsoft account.
        Internet Explorer is disabled. Microsoft Edge is the recommended replacement and includes IE Mode which may be useful in certain scenarios.
        Math Input Panel is removed. Math Recognizer will install on demand and includes the math input control and recognizer. Math inking in apps like OneNote are not impacted by this change.
        News & Interests has evolved. New functionality has been added which can be found by clicking the Widgets icon on the Taskbar.
        Quick Status from the Lockscreen and associated settings are removed.
        S Mode is only available now for Windows 11 Home edition.
        Snipping Tool continues to be available but the old design and functionality in the Windows 10 version has been replaced with those of the app previously known as Snip & Sketch.
        Start is significantly changed in Windows 11 including the following key deprecations and removals…

      • #2373442
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        TPM 2.0 is a requirement for Windows 11 (Microsoft’s own Surface Book 2 is not Win11 compatible).

        1Ghz 64-bit dual-core processor
        4GB RAM
        64GB storage
        9-inch display (1366×768 resolution)
        UEFI, Secure Boot
        TPM 2.0
        DirectX 12 compatible graphics / WDDM 2.x

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2373456
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          That was quick. This is amazing, how fast Windows 11 came. And next week, they start to roll this out for insiders. Forcing customers to obsolence after 3 (!) years and advising to buy new device is obviously new standard. Im so happy with my GNU/Linux.
          Advice to go to BIOS/UEFI and enabling TPM can be utopia, because enabling TPM 1.1 (or whatever version do we have) does not allow to install anyway.
          Semms like Bitlocker will be critical service for Win11. Wonder if Microsoft solved all problems with TPM during updates, guess not, users will use anyway, right? Recently there were issues when WU updated TPM firmware during update.

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 20H2 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2373458
          Moonshine
          AskWoody Lounger

          TPM 2.0 is a requirement for Windows 11

          That’s not strictly true and a little deceptive to those who have a report that their machine isn’t capable of upgrading/updating to W11 (should they want to).
          Intel PTT has been around for a few years now and it is starting to get mainstream attention as motherboard makers have begun removing TPM pin headers from their boards to reduce costs and to free up motherboard surface area for other features.
          I ran the W11 Health Check shown in your link:

          https://download.microsoft.com/download/1/d/d/1dd9969b-bc9a-41bc-8455-bc657c939b47/WindowsPCHealthCheckSetup.msi

          . . . . and it reported that my 10 month old, high spec, machine isn’t capable of running Windows 11.
          I did know the PTT isn’t enabled by default so I wasn’t too worried.
          I simply enabled it in the BIOS and here’s the before and after:

          I have no doubt that many machines won’t be capable of running W11 for a variety of reasons, but I’m sure many can without the actual TPM 2.0 chip which is widely reported as needed.

          4 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2373459
            doriel
            AskWoody Lounger

            Cant check the compatibility on a domain joined PC.

            Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 20H2 Enterprise

            HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      • #2373536
        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        Intel PTT has been around for a few years now and it is starting to get mainstream attention as motherboard makers have begun removing TPM pin headers from their boards to reduce costs and to free up motherboard surface area for other features.

        Thanks for the info on PTT. My board has the PIN headers for TPM, so I have already ordered one of those.

        But I was curious to see what my BIOS had to offer for PTT/TPM. In my “Advanced > PCH-FW Configuration” I had the options for a “Discete TPM”, or a “Firmware TPM”. The discrete version was selected, but changing to firmware brought up the PTT option, so that is available. I exited the BIOS without making changes, because Win 10 Pro Bitlocker is already in use and I didn’t wish to lose those keys.

        Will proceed with the discrete $15 TPM when the time comes…

         

      • #2373538
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2373566
          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          It’s a bit more complicated than that:
          https://www.theverge.com/2021/6/25/22549725/microsoft-windows-11-cpu-support-tpm-hardware-requirements

          There will be some sort of warning that Windows 11 is not fully supported on 6th Gen and 7th Gen Intel CPUs. That doesn’t prevent installation or upgrading.

          TPM 1.2 is the minimum requirement, not TPM 2.  Most modern PCs can meet this requirement.

          A front-facing camera is not required on desktop PCs.

          So the readiness tool is not telling people with the older but still modern components they can’t upgrade to Windows 11. Only that certain features will not work on the older PCs.

          At least that’s the way I read the article. We shall see what happens in the Real World.

          For myself, I’d just as soon leave Windows 11 for a new PC, as my existing Intel NUC is over five years old, and the original SSD probably will fail sometime not to far off.  The rest of the PC will handle Linux for years to come.

          -- rc primak

          • #2373594
            rc primak
            AskWoody_MVP

            But when I checked with the update readiness tool listed in this thread, it definitely will not budge on saying that anything you can do with a 6th Gen Intel system will never make Windows 11 accept it for an upgrade. So, no Windows 11 for me — EVER! Turning Secure Boot off again right now.

            -- rc primak

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2374371
              rc primak
              AskWoody_MVP

              Revision: Not on this PC at least. And that may turn out to be a good thing. Within the next three years I definitely will need a new PC, so now I’ll have guidance on what upgrades to consider.

              -- rc primak

      • #2373544
        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        Microsoft dropped support for 6th and 7th gen Intel CPUs with Windows 11

        I think that will probably need to be revised. As well as for the Ryzen 1000 and 2000 chips.

        I would also love to be a fly on the wall when the Windows 11 project team gets asked why a number of MS Surface computers are being dropped.

        Too many current CPUs with those specs will likely still be running in 3-4 years… my 2 cents…

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2376268
          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          The Microsoft Surface family of devices is overdue for a product line refresh. That will come with Windows 11. Support for their entire current product line is not important to Microsoft, it seems at this point.

          It’s the same thing Apple does when a new iPhone and a new iOS version are introduced, often with much fanfare. The older products go out of support and their performance is degraded if they are upgraded to the new software.

          -- rc primak

      • #2373546
        rdleib
        AskWoody Plus

        I bought a new computer, had it built, exactly 2 years ago. Has:

        Intel Core i9-9900K 3.6Ghz (5.0Ghz Turbo) 16MB Cache Eight-Core CPU – Coffee Lake-S
               Max memory size 128GB
               Max memory channels 2
        ASUS Prime Z390-A (Intel Z390, HDMI, 3xPCI-E, 2XM.2, 6xSATA, 4xDDR4 Motherboard
        16GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR4 3200Mhz Memory
        Samsung 970 EVO Plus (M2 slot) 500 GB
        Samsung 860 Evo SATA SSD 2 TB
        6GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti GDDR6 PCI-E HDMI/DP Video Card
        Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
        Doesn’t have a TPM chip on the motherboard, so can’t be updated to Win11.
        Ever.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2373631
          Bill C.
          AskWoody Plus

          I bought a new computer, had it built, exactly 2 years ago. Has:

          Intel Core i9-9900K 3.6Ghz (5.0Ghz Turbo) 16MB Cache Eight-Core CPU – Coffee Lake-S
                 Max memory size 128GB
                 Max memory channels 2
          ASUS Prime Z390-A (Intel Z390, HDMI, 3xPCI-E, 2XM.2, 6xSATA, 4xDDR4 Motherboard
          16GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR4 3200Mhz Memory
          Samsung 970 EVO Plus (M2 slot) 500 GB
          Samsung 860 Evo SATA SSD 2 TB
          6GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti GDDR6 PCI-E HDMI/DP Video Card
          Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
          Doesn’t have a TPM chip on the motherboard, so can’t be updated to Win11.
          Ever.

          The ASUS Prime Z390-A motherboard takes the ASUS TPM-M R2.0 14-1 pin TPM module. I am running the same board and it has the pins on the board and the settings in the UEFI. However, the module is sold out everywhere I have just looked after reading about Windows 11 and watching the broadcast. Fortunately the module is around $15 US.

          Actually, my PC has a very similar configuration to yours, except for the CPU/RAM (here a 9700K and 32GB RAM) Same GPU and and a 1TB 970 EVO boot, a 1TB Crucial SATA SSD, and a 1TB WD Black spinner.

          Not really an issue for me as I am running Linux Mint 20.1 “Ulyssa” Cinnamon, but I built this box with an eye on Windows compatibility in case the Linux did not work out. But it has, even running my favorite Steam games under Steam for Linux with the Proton compatibility layer.

      • #2373583
        Average-Jane
        AskWoody Plus

        My feedback is ewwwww.

        Despite Microsoft championing itself as the protector of openness, I see the increasingly stringent Microsoft Account requirement, the SecureBoot enablement, and the emphasis on apps and app stores as moving in the direction of Google-Android and Apple – aka locking down.

        I don’t do anything particularly interesting with computers, but I at least educate myself on keeping mine running well, watching the DEFCON to know when to update.  Being corralled into one silo or another for my own good reeks of dehumanization – in the context of a new operating system that word is exaggerating things, but I still don’t like my internet activity being farmed for advertising or whatever social engineering is being cooked up next.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2373592
        KB6OJS
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m still making my way through the 90-minute launch video, about halfway through it. Obviously I haven’t tried Windows 11 myself so I can’t comment on it from first-hand experience, but so far it looks pretty impressive although I suspect they’ve been taking some lessons from the MacOS UI. Still, I like what I’ve seen so far. I won’t install any Insider builds until they get to the Release Candidate stage, and absolutely I won’t install the leaked version that’s floating around out there. Anything else I do with it will be in a virtual machine if I decide to look at it before the RC stage.

      • #2373632
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Microsoft released an updated Check for compatibility tool

        Anyone can give me a logical reason why the tool has to be installed and not portable ?
        Is the reason continuing telemetry ?

      • #2373633
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        There will be some sort of warning that Windows 11 is not fully supported on 6th Gen and 7th Gen Intel CPUs. That doesn’t prevent installation or upgrading.

        TPM 1.2 is the minimum requirement, not TPM 2.  Most modern PCs can meet this requirement.

        TPM 2.0 in mandatory the same goes for CPU 8th gen+…

      • #2373741
        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        The ASUS Prime Z390-A motherboard takes the ASUS TPM-M R2.0 14-1 pin TPM module. I am running the same board and it has the pins on the board and the settings in the UEFI. However, the module is sold out everywhere I have just looked after reading about Windows 11 and watching the broadcast. Fortunately the module is around $15 US.

        Same Asus motherboard here. Those modules are likely to remain in short supply for a while. Probably a good idea to waitlist, or back order if you can.

        Good thing we all have until 2025 to upgrade… 🙂

      • #2373752
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I think that while Windows 10 will continue with 21H2….25H2 updates, Windows 11 will update to Windows 12…17.

      • #2373755
        anonymous
        Guest

        I wouldn’t touch the leaked version of Windows 11. How do you verify that it has not been tampered with prior to being hosted for upload? Then to replace system files within the ISO to circumvent system checks is just asking for trouble, even in a VM!

      • #2373884
        Simon_Weel
        AskWoody Plus

        Helge Klein wrote an article about checking TPM status: How to Check the TPM Status & Enable the CPU’s fTPM/PTT • Helge Klein

      • #2373946
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Intel Macs can’t run Windows 11 without this workaround

        (This is for Intel Macs but it is good for Windows PCs as well).

        Replacing “Install.esd” file in Windows 11 ISO with “Install.esd” (or “Install.wim” renamed to “Install.esd” from a Windows 10 ISO.

      • #2376318
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        It’s the same thing Apple does when a new iPhone and a new iOS version are introduced, often with much fanfare. The older products go out of support and their performance is degraded if they are upgraded to the new software.

        It is not the same. The new iOS 15 support 7 years old iPhone 6s.
        The new macOS Monterey support Mac PCs from 2013.

        Performance is not downgraded. Old iPhone/iPad can’t support some of the new features due to lack of the SoC with Axx Bionic …

        There is no other company (hardware, software) in the world which can match Apple’s support and service.

      • #2376319
        BATcher
        AskWoody_MVP

        Feedback for Windows 11?

        Quite easy – none from me ‘at this time’.  And there will be none in the future unless Windows 11 can run on my current collection of mildly elderly PCs and laptops, which host Windows 10 quite happily.

        Why should I buy stupidly overspecified machines just to run a new operating system not wildly different from the current one, with the same applications?

        BATcher

        Plethora means a lot to me.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2376323
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          Why should I buy stupidly overspecified machines just to run a new operating system

          Exacly. OS should be environment for running applications, not the bottle neck of our computer.

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 20H2 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

          1 user thanked author for this post.
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