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  • When should you patch?

    Posted on Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody blog When should you patch?

    • This topic has 7 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago.
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      • #2322280
        Susan Bradley
        Manager

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2322398
        James Bond 007
        AskWoody Lounger

        Susan, in your article you said:

        As much as many of us love to create dual-boot machines, this is something that can trigger issues. I recommend only doing dual booting if you are an expert user — and ensure you have a backup of the system.

        Exactly what kind of issues are you talking about?

        My own systems ALL have multi-booting between Windows 8.1 / Windows 7 and maybe Windows 10 (LTSB / LTSC only for testing purposes). I setup the disk using MBR partitioning (not GPT) and use a special boot program that presents a menu upon computer start and lists all available bootable partitions. Once a partition is selected all other partitions are then hidden so that the booted Windows system cannot see the other partitions on the disk. While this takes some time to setup I have never had a problem.

        When I experimented with Windows 10 Pro / Enterprise in VMware Workstation (the virtual machine used a MBR disk and not a GPT disk), I noticed that when I attempted to upgrade a Windows 10 virtual machine to a newer build (e.g. 1809 -> 1909) the Windows setup program invariably created a 500MB (approximate) partition on the Windows disk, resizing the Windows partition in the process, all without asking for my permission. I would think this would be very troublesome if the user has a dual boot or multi-boot system as this action might alter or destroy other partitions on the system disk rendering the other operating systems (e.g. Linux) unbootable. I have always wondered why the Windows 10 setup program do this when upgrading Windows 10.

        Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by James Bond 007. Reason: Correction
        • #2322401
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          This makes you an expert user in computerland. The ranks are small in percentage terms, but that’s still a lot of people.

          cheers, Paul

          • #2322405
            Susan Bradley
            Manager

            The problem with getting old is that your brain can  only hold so much.  But I distinctly remember a past update that was having issues getting installed and many of the impacted patchers were dual booters.

            You can see some threads here:  but I don’t remember the exact update anymore.  It is a more advanced scenerio.

            Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      • #2322466
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP
      • #2322713
        sheldon
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m a little confused.  How is this “CHKDSK /f” issue being fixed?  A new patch?  The same patch being re-issued?  Or?

        • #2322718
          Susan Bradley
          Manager

          The patch is not being reissued.  It’s something on the back end of Microsoft.

          Inside the patch is this info:  This installer database contains the logic and data required to install Known Issue Rollback Policy Definitions

           

          From someone on the patchmanagement.org list

          “I downloaded the Group Policy item from their link and took a look at it. It adds an ADMX/ADML to Group Policy (under Administrative Templates) called ”KB4586853 Issue 002 Rollback” which sets the following registry key when enabled:

          HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Policies\Microsoft\FeatureManagement\Overrides

          [DWORD] “2372249226” = 0″

           

          Instead of using the /f option, it’s better to use newer the chkdsk /scan command – which avoids the issue discussed above.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

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