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  • Whittaker: Speak truth to power

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Whittaker: Speak truth to power

    This topic contains 35 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  discorallado 3 weeks ago.

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    • #1989626 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      I just finished reading James Whittaker’s post on Medium called Speaking Truth to Power: Reflections on My Career at Microsoft. Wow. If you want to se
      [See the full post at: Whittaker: Speak truth to power]

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1989641 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      It will take a while for the curmudgeons to age out of the organization.  But it’s happening.

      Many of the most egregious offenders of the late 1990’s / early 2000’s Microsoft have ended up at places like Google and Facebook, which probably explains some of the subtle but insidious anti-competitive practices we’ve seen from those companies in recent years.

      Meanwhile, there’s a growing crop of younger MS employees who are gung-ho on direct community engagement, open source, and cross-platform.  Someday they’ll be the people running the company, but they aren’t there yet.

      • #1989661 Reply

        AJNorth
        AskWoody Plus

        Meanwhile, there’s a growing crop of younger MS employees who are gung-ho on direct community engagement, open source, and cross-platform.  Someday they’ll be the people running the company, but they aren’t there yet.

        They have until 2023… .

      • #1989885 Reply

        anonymous

        Really the younger crop is not even been aware of history and will potentially become much worse and there really is no community if anyone chooses Microsoft on any of the other companies that started in the late 70s/early 80s into the 1990’s that have morphed into their current Very IBM like state of affairs.

        I’ll expect that as far as the OS on the PC/Laptop is concerned that it’s some smaller Linux OS Distro mostly for anyone with real desire for Community and not tied totally into the x86 processor market. And anything x86 is still much too dependent on MS’s OS products currently and hopefully there can be some younger folks wishing to avoid that sort of involvement if possible.

        I’d like there to be some Linux OS laptop OEM upstart that will give some of AMD’s Zen based x86 a try without becoming too dependent on just Intel/Nvidia but laptops are a tough market to get into on the Linux side currently for AMD. MS and Apple are more like the IBM that they once declared as the bad guy only to become much worse than IBM in the end.

        Maybe there can be some non Google dependent movement on the Linux Kernel side as well but that too is an uphill battle against another deep pockets behemoth. And really the technology sector’s attraction for any new generations if they think that any of those  ossified entities are able to be changed from the inside by any younger generation taking the helm are undertaking mostly a fool’s errand.

        It’s better to break away from that and move in some other direction for any youth and maybe start to focus on starting some open source hardware as well as software movement as best as possible around some Open Sourced ISA based processor running some lesser known Linux Kernel and Desktop Environment that respects the individual to a greater degree.

        Curmudgeons never aged out completely from upper management at IBM, nor will that happen for Microsoft, Apple, Google, and others. Any upper management curmudgeons will always groom their replacements in these established companies with new curmudgeons rising up from middle management to fill the void. The only place where curmudgeons are actually replaced is in the ranks of the most productive 40-55 year old workers that are replaced at the lower rungs of the latter to make the balance sheets look better to the investors. So that’s mostly older very productive workers replaced by lower wage youngsters that have less medical issues and can be lower paid due to lack of experience. And that’s all so some upper management CEO(curmudgeon) can look better  to the company’s  BOD and the big institutional investors.

        And it has always been thus at any of those established behemoths and that’s always going to require some younger upstarts to found their own from the start and hope that they too will not end up co-opted with time as well.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1989768 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Nadella is firmly entrenched at the top and shall remain there for as long as he manages to keep the big investors happy getting them big returns on their investments. I don’t see how those coming up in the ranks are going to change much with Nadella in charge and determined to keep on taking MS in its present, Cloud-centric direction while, it seems, quite pleased with the way Windows is “taken care of” at MS. I do not  expect major changes in policy at MS and other companies with similar investor-backed captains of industry in charge, at least until after: (a) the next big recession (which the financial sector seems bent on bringing about, apparently not caring that much to lean the lessons of the last one); (b) the failure of the “the Cloud for everything” Big Idea; (d) the failure of some of he other disruptive, innovative (insert your favorite “tech cool” adjective here) Big Ideas brought in by Nadella and his people.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1990548 Reply

        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        (a) the next big recession (which the financial sector seems bent on bringing about, apparently not caring that much to lean the lessons of the last one); (b) the failure of the “the Cloud for everything” Big Idea; (d) the failure of some of he other disruptive, innovative (insert your favorite “tech cool” adjective here) Big Ideas brought in by Nadella and his people.

        What happened to (c) ?😁

        I think you re basically correct here, pain before gain.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1989797 Reply

      anonymous

      Warren has the mark, if I read him correctly and Whittaker as well. This new direction away from Windows is the desired goal. We who want the Personal Computer form, with an appropriate Operating System to run it, we are the ones that exist in a past world and will be replaced. Because, progress.

    • #1989819 Reply

      Mele20
      AskWoody Lounger

      He writes a great article but he is not with what he speaks. I wanted to give him applause at the end. I clicked on the clapping hands and ended up on a page that gave me two, and only two, choices: sign up via Google or sign up via Facebook! What was even worse was that I was trapped on that page with those two completely unacceptable choices! I block Facebook and almost all Google services via my Hosts file for many, many years and have always used a Google alternative search engine even when they were not very good.

      There was NO way to go back from that mandatory login in screen. So, I closed the tab and opened a new one to the article. But guess what? The article is BLOCKED and I got, instead, a page saying I MUST signup via either Google or Facebook to read the article. There was a way to click to see the privacy policy which I read with increasing horror.

      Whittaker may not be at Microsoft now but he is still a “made man”.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1989828 Reply

        jabeattyauditor
        AskWoody Lounger

        What makes you think that Whittaker does anything for Medium other than write the occasional article?

        Why do you blame him for their approach to earning an income?

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1989899 Reply

          anonymous

          Having to sign in with either Google or Facebook to read the content speaks for itself in that forum poster’s commentary and very valid desire for privacy. I’d rather think that “made man” is very good description and will not read anything that requires any Google or Facebook/other sign-in sorts of tie-in and monetization.

          If more of the web becomes dependent on possessing a Google, Facebook, Twitter, other big social/search entity based  sign in/credentials  to read content then I’m going somewhat post internet and high technology as best as possible.

          It appears that the internet frontier is in fact closing up under the  fence post and barbed wire sort of stage and I’ll take the exit from that information superhighway onto some peaceful side roads where I can find my entertainment and enrichment some other way that respects the individual more than the trending or the need to push out the targeted advertising.

           

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #1990284 Reply

            jabeattyauditor
            AskWoody Lounger

            Having to sign in with either Google or Facebook to read the content speaks for itself in that forum poster’s commentary and very valid desire for privacy.

            It isn’t necessary to sign in with any sort of credentials to read the article.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1990323 Reply

        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        I can close that popup window if I click “CLAP”. Top right corner. This prevents bots from attacking your page. Maybe Captcha code would be more suitable to this article, but that is set for the domain by its creator, not contributor.

        I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.
        --- Thomas A. Edison

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by  doriel. Reason: lounge rules
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    • #1989946 Reply

      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      As far as I am concerned, and this has been the case since ~1993, Microsoft is Windows.  I don’t mean in terms of revenue, but in terms of my concern for any given products or services they have offered.  My opinion of Windows is my opinion of Microsoft; the two are one and the same.  If I even have opinions about other products of Microsoft, they’re compartmentalized; they don’t affect my opinion of the “real” Microsoft, which is the bit of MS that makes Windows.

      As such, I look at the various CEOs of MS by the Windows versions that they were responsible for.  Windows 95, the Windows version that finally got the UI right, happened on Gates’ watch.  The bundling of IE with Windows for the purpose of capturing the web happened on his watch, too.  Windows XP was released during the Ballmer years, but only barely; it was based closely on Windows 2000, which had been developed during the Gates era.  Win 2k/XP remain the high water mark for Windows, in my opinion, so even though I loathed what MS had done to Netscape, I sort of pushed that to the side in my mind, since Windows XP was quite good.

      Vista happened on Ballmer’s watch too.  It had its roots in the Gates era, but I count this as a Ballmer release.  So, too, was 7.  And then we have 8, which has a weird touch-oriented UI, but at least it doesn’t try to conscript your PC into the Microsoft army.

      Windows 10 is the sole release during the Nadella years, and it’s supposed to remain that way.  None of that culture stuff is of any concern to me… I don’t work there, and I don’t care about whether their mojo is back, or whether their stockholders are happy.  All that concerns me is the state of Windows, and by my standards, it’s the worst it’s ever been, by a country mile, since I started using Windows (as 3.0).  I was a Windows evangelist at one time; I fought the good fight for Wintel during the Mac vs. PC forum wars.  I avoided Vista, but I never cursed Microsoft’s name for making it… I had XP, and I was happy with that.  I never cursed Microsoft either for making 8.x… I had 7, and I was happy with that too.

      How things have changed.  It’s been fashionable to dump on Microsoft for as long as I can remember, particularly among Linux users, but I never really did that prior to Nadella.  I said some rather harsh things about them during the IE6 days, and deservedly so.  Windows, though, was my “home” of sorts, and each successive version genuinely earned its place on my desktop, up to 7, and later 8.1, duly modified.

      Now I am one of the ones who seemingly has little good to say about Microsoft.  What can I say?  I evaluate Microsoft by looking at Windows, and there is very little positive to say about Windows right now.  It’s the first version that was bad enough to make me consider, then actually commit to, leaving Windows behind.  That happened on Nadella’s watch, and therefore forms my opinion of Microsoft from 2015 until the present.

      The author did say that one of Nadella’s failures was to assign “made men” to Windows after they brought down any hopes MS had of being a player in the mobile arena, which may be true.  Windows 10, though, was already on its current trajectory when MS called it quits on mobile.  GWX, forced updates, dark patterns, all that stuff happened while Windows 10 mobile still existed.  If the recognized failure of Windows mobile happened before Windows 10 came out, though, it would explain a lot about how 10 was, and is, being developed.  MS has still not shown any sign that they truly understand that a mobile OS and a PC OS are fundamentally different, and what works for one will not work for the other.

      I agree with Woody’s assessment.  Microsoft will endure and thrive, most likely, for the perceivable future.  Windows… I don’t think so.  One thing Gates and Ballmer knew very well was that you don’t do anything that would harm the Windows platform, or to jeopardize its dominance.  You don’t monetize it, and you don’t force people to use a version they do not like.  They could have forced Vista when it failed, but they didn’t.  They certainly liked money as much then as they do now, but they never monetized it.  Keeping the Windows franchise healthy was the key to everything.

      Now it looks like Windows is being chopped up and sold off piece by piece. Sure, that will raise the profitability of Windows as long as there are more pieces to sell, but that’s a finite resource.  People are lining up to be monetized and bossed around by Microsoft for now, but that’s a predictable effect of MS having the continued dominance of Windows on the desktop as the company’s most sacred goal– and something they are very good at.  The vendor lock-in was deliberate, and it’s paying dividends now, but the strategy that kept them on top for a quarter century is no longer being employed.

      If it was possible to make money in the way that Nadella’s Windows now is, without eventually toppling the whole house of cards, Gates would have done it.  Ballmer probably would have.  The things that Nadella’s MS is doing to make money with Windows now are in no way clever or innovative, so there is no reason to think that only Nadella (or his subordinates) could ever think of them.

      I don’t think the long-term prognosis for Windows is good.  I also do not think that is a point lost on MS.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.17.3).

      • #1990476 Reply

        AlexEiffel
        AskWoody_MVP

        Ascaris, I completely agree with what you said so eloquently, like you usually do.

        I don’t condone a bad culture, but the end result, the product, was better before, so I don’t see at all how the culture is so much responsible for the failure or success of Windows. I much prefer the know-it-all era that seemed to actually know a thing or two than the current disconnected culture where you constantly release more buggy software where regression has become a way of life.

        According to the author, the worst years without innovation were the 00’s??? When Windows 7 came out? I loved XP maybe the most in many ways, but 7 was more stable before the new era with what happened with the QA.

        Like you, I would blame Microsoft for many justified reasons, but I would always defend the imperfect Windows because it was a great product and when they made mistakes, it was mistakes that could be reversed, not condescending stubborn attempts at convincing customers that they are the problem if they don’t like the product.

        What I find completely puzzling is the end of the article where you can read “At its core, Microsoft is a company that makes its money the old fashioned way: by creating products of value that people willingly part with their money to use. They stand as a bulwark against the data mongering and user exploitation that Google and Facebook see as the future of humanity.” Really? Is that what we feel they are trying to do right now? I thought they were trying to become a cheap imitation of those giants while still charging for the privilege, in a having your cake and eat it scenario. The latest example being the situation with the online account that is for your own good, so we will make it very difficult for you not-too-computer-savvy person to create a local account.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1990211 Reply

      gkarasik
      AskWoody Plus

      Windows is a failure only technically and only to techs. Once you remember that MS is a corporation and that a corporation’s sole goal is making money, Windows is a huge success.

      GaryK

    • #1990316 Reply

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      I don’t think the long-term prognosis for Windows is good.  I also do not think that is a point lost on MS.

      Well the Windows 10 hassle really does kind of look like Microsoft trying to pull as much revenue out of a doomed product line as they can…

      If at any point their projected profits start to look iffy, they *can* with fairly little effort jump tracks and go to selling primarily applications and services – with their own revenue-generating cloud subscription services – on top of some other operating system base.

      (Really, the minimum for that would be to port the full OneDrive / SharePoint client, the Azure Information Protection suite and a few PowerShell module libraries to Linux – then fork and tweak Wine and make latest versions of Office run on it too to gain more value. Could even port the user interface layer as a desktop environment.)

      Windows is a failure only technically and only to techs. Once you remember that MS is a corporation and that a corporation’s sole goal is making money, Windows is a huge success.

      Exactly. And being a publicly traded corporation, that tends towards short-term profits, too.

      As far as I am concerned, and this has been the case since ~1993, Microsoft is Windows.  I don’t mean in terms of revenue, but in terms of my concern for any given products or services they have offered.

      Yeah, that might have to change in the coming years.

      It’s possible that they’ll manage to fix the problems with Windows 10 but they don’t have to count on that.

      • #1990402 Reply

        Elrod
        AskWoody Plus

        Those of us with whom Microsoft broke trust with the whole GWX debacle and their whole patching mess will ignore any attempt by Microsoft to float their own services atop Linux.  Once burned, and all that.

        There is a group of individuals who never saw Microsoft as a positive entity, and who will also most likely ignore such an attempt.

        I don’t really see a market for Microsoft services running on Linux.  I prefer that things actually work before they’re deployed in production.  But stranger things have happened.  There was a time when I thought I’d never see Apple Macs running on Intel hardware.

        Group "L": Linux Mint

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1990409 Reply

          jabeattyauditor
          AskWoody Lounger

          There was a time when I thought I’d never see Apple Macs running on Intel hardware.

          Made possible, of course, by running the GUI on top of UNIX.

      • #1991239 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        I wrote:

        As far as I am concerned, and this has been the case since ~1993, Microsoft is Windows. I don’t mean in terms of revenue, but in terms of my concern for any given products or services they have offered.

        Yeah, that might have to change in the coming years.

        I don’t think it will.  I know MS has already moved on from being “the Windows company,” and I was aware of the apparent irony when I wrote about how I form my opinion of MS.  I’m painfully aware that Windows is no longer the center of the Microsoft universe (much as the Mac is no longer the center of Apple’s).  It’s pretty clear… Windows doesn’t even get its own department anymore.  It’s a legacy product, and it’s one that consumes resources out of proportion to its profitability.

        If PC sales continue to fall, Windows revenues will too, but the development costs won’t scale downward with revenue.  I don’t have any doubt that somewhere in Redmond, there’s a circle on a calendar somewhere that represents the day when Windows ceases to be profitable and merely breaks even.  As Nadella wrote in his book, he’s not excited by offering products that offer a modest profit.  He likes the BIIIG profits! (Unlike other CEOs, I guess?)  Windows no longer brings in the big profits as it once did, so what’s to lose by monetizing it to death?  If it dies, good riddance; if it lives, lots of monetizing of the users.  Win-win.

        None of that changes the barometer by which I measure my opinion of Microsoft.  If Windows is not a product I am willing to use, I have no further concern for, nor connection to, Microsoft.  All of those very profitable services or products I don’t use don’t matter to me.  Windows matters, or it did once, and for a long time.  You can’t unring the bell; even if Windows reversed course, dropped WaaS, gave control back over updates and everything else, I’d be reluctant to put all my eggs in that basket again.  Trust is earned, not given, and they’ve got a lot of making up to do before they even get back to the zero point.  I wouldn’t drop Linux and run back to Windows even if they met every one of my wishes for Windows, but the odds of me using Windows outside of a VM, and even then for the bare minimum for whichever Windows-only task I need to do, would improve.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.17.3).

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1991262 Reply

          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Plus

          Unfortunately, even if one dumps Windows for one’s personal use, one will still find it difficult to be totally free of influence from MS. Most of your healthcare providers will be using Windows as will most veterinarians. Use Walgreen’s for your pharmacy? Then you’re using MS software, albeit indirectly. MS is expanding into all things healthcare related. One’s medical and dental records could well be stored in the MS cloud. (‘MS cloud’ is an interesting phrase, isn’t it?). One’s medical images could be analyzed with MS artificial intelligence software. Imagined being operated on because of a false positive for a tumor, or worse, not operated on because of a false negative. (“Sorry, the false positive patch bricked our system. Then after that patch was pulled and reissued it started giving too many false negatives. After it was pulled and reissued again, we think it’s finally working correctly. but we’ll have to open you up again to be sure.” And, yes, I know competent medical professionals would not base their decision to operate solely on an AI-analyzed image, but you get my drift.)

          If MS pays the same level of attention to detail to their other software products that they seemingly pay to Windows…. Well, I for one want no part of that. My experience with Windows does not inspire confidence in me of their abilities to produce good software products.

    • #1990347 Reply

      doriel
      AskWoody Lounger

      Times have changed. But we (and microsoft too) is lost in the sea of upgrades, cumulative updates, security updates, optional updates, builds, servicing branches, fast rings, preview rings, windows life cycles, 19H2, 20H1, enterpise versions, home versions, patches that repair what updates caused, … I dont know. I think they took too big spoon of cinnamon to swallow. Someday it will be better, but now they are suffocating little bit.
      They should have focused on one thing and make really good like XP was. And 7 too. This forest of devices cant be simply covered by one product.. ermm.. excuse me, service.

      I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.
      --- Thomas A. Edison

    • #1990408 Reply

      John
      AskWoody Lounger

      Microsoft became too big to react to trends, it’s not as though they missed the signs or ignored them. They were simply too slow to do much to remain relevant to them. You see this a lot with big companies, they simply become their own worst enemy in terms of recognizing what they need to do, and then doing it. I can imagine lower level people screaming that we need to act, and upper management simply sits on their hands. Too worried about failure so they do nothing.

    • #1990413 Reply

      anonymous

      I’m confused about the most salient topic here, the decline of Windows OS quality. Whittaker blames the Gates and Ballmer culture, but Windows has gotten WORSE under Nadella. So, at least for Desktop/Server Windows, his conclusion should be the opposite!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1990438 Reply

      Pointedly
      AskWoody Plus

      Under Nadella, Microsoft has outsourced testing of Windows updates to the Insider program. We see how that has gone. Perhaps Windows 10 really will be “the last version of Windows.” Is so, one has to ask what will follow? There has been some conjecture that Microsoft’s next operating system may be based on a Linux kernel. They couldn’t call it “Windows,” though. Maybe “Gates?” Nah, that wouldn’t be right, either. Anyone else have a (clean) suggestion for a name?

    • #1990497 Reply

      Doug Terborg
      AskWoody Plus

      Whittaker praises Nadella for his new take on things.

      However, it seems Whittaker is addressing culture issues, and perhaps strategy.  Whittaker certainly doesn’t address issues we as everyday in-the-trenches IT people need Nadella to care about (I’m sure he’s already heard them).

      • Quality Control
      • Interfaces that don’t change every 1-2 weeks (yes, I’m talking you Office 365 administration), even though those changes may be positive and forward-thinking
      • The ability to listen to the people who support Microsoft’s product offerings.
      • The need for Microsoft to be our partner, not our “We’re going to leverage these new strategies to eventually take over IT-space too” (which I have a lot of trouble envisioning their capability to do so succesfully -I see this as coming out half-baked)

      It’s nice to see the cultural shift  promoted.  But I also understand every prominent or brilliant ex-Microsoft woman employee’s response too, because I continue to hear this being the same problem among the women who leave; issues that seem pervasive at Silicon Valley tech giants.  Microsoft has a lot of work to do beyond their current if they want trust -but maybe that’s not something they care about unless it’s within specific demographics.

      We are SysAdmins.
      We walk in the wiring closets no others will enter.
      We stand on the bridge, and no malware may pass.
      We engage in tech support, we do not retreat.
      We live for the LAN.
      We die for the LAN.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1991034 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        To clarify matters: this is not just a technicians – Sysadmins’ issue. It is an issue for anyone who uses a computer running Windows for doing actual work besides having fun swapping  animated cat gifs. And such users, myself for example, may not have Sysadmins guardian angels looking after them and their computers. If so, then ready or not, they have to step in the breach, when necessary (as I have to) and always keep watching for trouble coming at them.

        Sites like this one are helpful, but one also  has to develop some experience sniffing out possible sources of trouble, and that takes time.  If the OS came with fewer bugs and kinks, everyone would need to spend less time defending from them and more in getting done what needs to be done.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1991092 Reply

      anonymous

      This is banging the usual progressive drum about inclusion, diversity, women in tech, culture of harassment, etc.  Some of this may be true but considering how fashionable it is now to talk about, I find it meaningless.

      The 2000s were probably the strongest period of time for Microsoft.  Vista might be the red-headed step child of the lineup, but it did advance the Windows codebase to the point that 7 became possible, and as bad as 8 was from a GUI perspective it was a major advancement capabilities-wise as well.  Add to that the push to dominance of Visual Studio .Net (which integrated many languages), Hyper-V, Server management, and Office.  IE floundered hard with 6 but became good from 7-11, up until Chrome started to establish dominance.  Even Windows Mobile was pretty good for its time, even though it definitely did eat it once the iPhone was released.  I had an old 2002 CE device and have supported older Win Mobile scanners recently as well.  Windows Embedded was decent both XP era and 7 (maybe IoT 10 is good? I don’t know yet).  What about XBox, and Microsoft Games?  Some of the best games were released by Microsoft as a publisher during the early to mid 2000s.

      The profit increase Microsoft has seen in recent years has come from squeezing more pennies out of their loyal userbase.  Their cloud technology is either their saviour in its infancy or an albatross, with my money being on the latter.  They’re abusing their partner connections, trying to undercut them in the hardware space while reducing benefits for sales reps.  Then there’s the change to IT Pros (eg Technet) which have all happened recently.  Microsoft hasn’t become more humble, more willing to learn.  They’ve become less willing to participate or maintain their ecosystem, instead relying on social media to build a “culture” and hoping everyone follows because they still need them.

      Maybe Microsoft’s work environment was worse during the Gates/Balmer period, I don’t know.  However Nadella’s culture has created such things as Microsoft: The Musical, and a Preview Ring team who prefer tweeting nonsense rather than doing their job.  Not to bother touching on the obvious problems reported here daily.  Personally, I preferred a Microsoft which was less enamoured with its own image and instead worked on developing solid products that everyone used.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1991187 Reply

      anonymous

      Just finished reading Whittaker’s lengthy comments. Seems like a hodgepodge of potentially valid points mixed with sour grapes.

      However, at the end of the day only one thing matters to me:

      Microsoft under Gates and Ballmer delivered products/updates that I wanted to use/purchase.

      Ever since Nadella/Windows 8, Microsoft has been a perpetual train wreck.

      Microsoft no longer listen to developers or their users and thinks everyone should love their spyware/advertisement laden OS replacement.

      Considering the recurring subscription fees, Internet (Cloud) dependence and untested updates, I decided it was time for me move exclusively to Linux.

      For me, moving to Linux has proven to be a wise decision and I feel better about it with everyday that passes (especially when I continually read about ongoing Microsoft SNAFUs on AskWoody.com 😉 )

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1991238 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Anonymous: I agree that the Whittaker article is not beyond criticism, but for reasons I explained earlier in this thread and elsewhere, to me it’s all about already spilt milk. At present, while preparing for the Windows 7 EOL and for reasons very similar to yours moving to Linux, I have moved the bulk of my work to a Mac laptop and I’m also increasingly using Linux for some of the regular tasks I need to do, in order to get more familiarized with using it for my work and also with taking care of the system myself. So far, the macOS patches and updates are both for free and their installation can be delayed by months (patches) and even years in the case of the OS. This suites me just fine.

        However, the future is guaranteed to none: if Apple, later on, changes its policies in any way that seriously inconveniences me, I should be by then quite ready to switch fully (and quickly) to Linux. I don’t feel that I owe loyalty to brand names or pieces of software or hardware, in the sense of sticking with them through thick and thin. It does help that I do not need, or want, to have many Mac applications installed, expensive ones in particular, that a new version of the macOS could break, and that my laptop is the only Apple hardware product I use. But, in the last analysis, it is my firm belief that is much, much better to lit a candle than curse the darkness. Particularly the big corporate darkness. To me, that is the most practical approach. Now, if someone else likes to do the exact opposite (not you, of course, but some…), well, it’s a free country. Also, I’m really glad that’s not my problem.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1991327 Reply

      anonymous

      The article seems to miss a pretty critical connection, which is attributing MS’s greater revenue to the new culture-forward strategy.

      Quick search on the breakdown of MS’s revenue increases suggests it’s mostly driven by the corporate market–Corporate OEM Pro up, volume licenses up, cloud services up, consumer revenue down.

      The last part contrasts everything else, which suggests a worser products (which is in line with what we experience every month) but overall revenue increases due to growth in the corporate market. This would make sense since we are in a bubble economy right now with super cheap credit. Businesses must use Windows so as long as there is growth in businesses, corporate revenue will grow since it’s essentially a monopoly.

      Whittaker drew a correlation but didn’t make any cause to explain causation, and based on the revenue breakdowns, his argument that it’s culture-driven isn’t very convincing. It looks a lot more like it’s just a reflection of the bubble economy.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1991761 Reply

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Is market pressure going to push changes in Windows?

      Microsoft beat expectations with strong Windows revenue

      “While Azure is the big growth story, the segment Microsoft dubs “Personal Computing”—which includes gaming but also Surface and Windows—returned to its throne as the highest-revenue segment for the company, at $11.1 billion. (Azure had frequently passed it recently.) This beat expectations thanks to strong performance from the Windows business tied to both new PC shipments and user upgrades to Windows 10 in the face of the imminent end-of-support for Windows 7.”

      What market pressure?  Compare the ecosystem of Microsoft/Windows columnists, Windows Forums on the internet, etc. to the ecosystem of Windows 10 deployments.  We’re comparing an ant to an elephant.  As I have said before, Microsoft’s business model is working.  How is that incentive for change?

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes (Windows updates are system changes), in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Dew

      • #1991984 Reply

        anonymous

        It is very difficult to gauge market pressure when the numbers are realigned year over year. Especially if this redefinition is done with the goal of affecting market pressure.

    • #1992021 Reply

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      It is very difficult to gauge market pressure when the numbers are realigned year over year. Especially if this redefinition is done with the goal of affecting market pressure.

      Perhaps we’re using different metrics for “Market pressure”.

      The only real news in a Microsoft earnings report will be when they miss estimates and the stock gets a beating. Until then, it is business as usual. –Joe

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes (Windows updates are system changes), in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Dew

      • #1992180 Reply

        anonymous

        Separating Azure, Surface, and Windows as you did by quotation, is indeed a very different metric than the MSFT stock price that Joe used as his yardstick. The link I offered bore upon your chosen measurement.

    • #1994867 Reply

      discorallado
      AskWoody Plus

      That is such a gorgeously constructed excerpt. I’ve added the full article to my lunchtime reading list 🙂

      And, in addition, the forum replies for this have been incredibly informative, and they provide an “outer atmosphere” regarding my knowledge of this whole d*****d menagerie.

      Have a great day, y’all.

      Rugged indoorsman.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Whittaker: Speak truth to power

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