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  • Why you don’t want to reboot in the middle of an update

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Why you don’t want to reboot in the middle of an update

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      • #2372055
        Susan Bradley
        Manager

        I spotted this video yesterday – it’s a really good recap of why you don’t want to reboot in the middle of an update . Click on that link and he expla
        [See the full post at: Why you don’t want to reboot in the middle of an update]

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2372066
        anonymous
        Guest

        Update is the Microsoft version of Mississipi Leg Hound from Summer Vacation- “If he does lay into you, let him finish”.

        Whatever happened to the progress bar! The spinning balls give you no idea what is happening (sometimes ditto using progress bars – 5% for half an our then you blink and its done).  However, when the vertigo wheels stop spinning, it causes worry. Half an hour of no vertigo spin is usually all I can cope with. In my early days I was a network controller – “turn it off at the key, wait ten seconds and turn it on”. I’ve had some black screens doing it but the black screen cured using the Network Controller’s fix-all.   As if to support my impatience, the times I have done that, the subsequent update process went quickly and I never lost a patient yet.

      • #2372103
        RetiredGeek
        AskWoody MVP

        I think you should retitle the post to Why You Should ALWAYS have an Image Backup BEFORE updating.

        HTH 😎

        May the Forces of good computing be with you!

        RG

        PowerShell & VBA Rule!
        Computer Specs

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2372116
        anonymous
        Guest

        It’s a shame that all Windows installations don’t have a small partition with Linux installed.  Then when Windows won’t boot you could boot the Linux and get online to get some help. Of course I always have a bootable thumb drive with Linux so I can get into my system.

        • #2372128
          anonymous
          Guest

          Unfortunately, any Linux manipulation of Windows files and folders can’t preserver NTFS permissions.  A WinPE/RE WIM build that includes a few basic “rescue” utilities on a bootable thumb drive is generally preferable, especially if it includes the utility for restoring the full system backup image that is always advisable prior to any major update.

          • #2372133
            RetiredGeek
            AskWoody MVP

            I created a PowerShell script to do all this for me and add things like NirSoft utilities and my own PowerShell tools. Once the custom .wim file is created I use Macrium Relfect’s Create Bootable Media tool to create the bootable USB and Reflect and just point the tool to my custom .wim file to get all the rest. Bingo, a single USB with the capability to diagnose problems and/or restore an image.

            HTH 😎

            May the Forces of good computing be with you!

            RG

            PowerShell & VBA Rule!
            Computer Specs

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2372209
              anonymous
              Guest

              Individuals will have their own WIM building preferences, of course.  Personally, I find the Win10XPE project (here) to be most versatile for including various “rescue” utilities including Macrium’s Reflect and/or Terabyte’s Image for Windows.  But the underlying backup and recovery safeguard principles remain the same regardless of methodological details.

      • #2372314
        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody_MVP

        …there’s a lot going on under the hood…

        The biggest clue is that these modern supercomputers still take literally minutes to get the job done. Almost nothing imaginable can take minutes on a machine that can do billions of calculations per second and move billions of bytes per second.

        Frankly I’m always a little bit amazed when a system file / serviceability check (which itself also can take literally minutes to run) comes up clean.

        ScreenGrab_CarboniPC_2021_06_19_164220

        -Noel

      • #2372318
        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody_MVP

        BTW, a decent backup – even today with the most recent version of Windows 10 – is Windows’ own Windows 7 System Image backup to create a system image. Don’t assume you need costly 3rd party software. I have scheduled nightly System Image backups using that tool and lo and behold you get multiple restore points courtesy the Volume Snapshot Subsystem, some Previous Versions capability, ability to restore to bare metal (with the aid of a System Repair Disc on USB stick), integration with the Windows Recovery Environment. It’s not actually a bad subsystem.

        -Noel

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2372381
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Don’t assume you need costly 3rd party software

        The free 3rd party apps will do all that you need, plus you can browse an existing backup to recover single files.

        cheers, Paul

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