• Win 10 Networking

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    #2484980

    Since the demise of Homegroups I have had trouble with networking Win 10 machines.

    My production computer is and updated Win 10  I have two Win 10 laptops for occasional use and neither  of them will show up as computers under the network. My old Win 7 machine (when turned on) and my NAS both appears on all my systems.

     

    All my computers are set to private profile with network discovery and file and printer sharing turned on.  I have been networking windows since Windows for workgroups and am flummoxed that it has become this hard to create a simple home network.

    Google searches for directions are useless as many links still contain Homegroups instructions or just give boilerplate settings instructions.

    Is there some way to get a foolproof instruction to connect Win 10 computers?

    Is Win 11 any better?

     

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    • #2485164

      Our Windows 10 machines can see each other fine (Explorer->Desktop->Network) in our private network. Each machine has the same Windows account name and password for one account.

      Are all hosts a member of the same workgroup? (Settings->About->Advanced system settings->Computer Name).

      Running the Windows Network Troubleshooter is worth a try but typically does not find any problems.

      You reviewed “Advanced Sharing Settings” on each machine. (Settings->Network & Internet->Network and Sharing Center->Change advanced sharing settings)

      For network trouble shooting, start to figure out what network layer is failing. For connection issues, my network troubleshooting starts off with ping by IP address. Run ipconfig, also issued from a command prompt. Collect all the IP4 addresses from the machines and ping each other from each machine. See what’s working and/or failing.

      In the meantime, share files using your NAS, until the Windows network connectivity problem is resolved.

    • #2485185

      until the Windows network connectivity problem is resolved.

      I gave up on Microsoft fixing networking bugs after switching from Windows 7 to Windows 10.
      My solution was to give each device on the network a fixed IP and adding devices to quick access.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2485219

      Make sure IPV6 is installed. This is typically required to allow peer to peer networking.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2485748

        Make sure IPV6 is installed. This is typically required to allow peer to peer networking.

        cheers, Paul

        Thanks for the suggestion. The production computer did not have IP6 activated. The laptop already did. Making the change seems to have made no difference.

    • #2485220

      My production computer is and updated Win 10  I have two Win 10 laptops for occasional use and neither  of them will show up as computers under the network.

      It has been my experience that when you have Windows networking setup right and it doesn’t “see” the another PCs the problem usually is security software on the unseen PC (usually the firewall) preventing it from answering and being “seen” and connecting….AKA stealth mode.

      Make sure all settings for the networking are set up on the PC you are trying to connect to over your network. On that PC, temporarily, deactivate all security software and the Firewall (either AV firewall or Windows firewall) and see if you can connect.

      Is there some way to get a foolproof instruction to connect Win 10 computers?

      The attached pdf is my instructions for setting up a home network with Windows 10.

      Set-Up-a-Home-Network-for-File-Sharing

      HTH, Dana:))

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2485749

      My production computer is and updated Win 10  I have two Win 10 laptops for occasional use and neither  of them will show up as computers under the network.

      It has been my experience that when you have Windows networking setup right and it doesn’t “see” the another PCs the problem usually is security software on the unseen PC (usually the firewall) preventing it from answering and being “seen” and connecting….AKA stealth mode.

      Make sure all settings for the networking are set up on the PC you are trying to connect to over your network. On that PC, temporarily, deactivate all security software and the Firewall (either AV firewall or Windows firewall) and see if you can connect.

      Is there some way to get a foolproof instruction to connect Win 10 computers?

      The attached pdf is my instructions for setting up a home network with Windows 10.

      Set-Up-a-Home-Network-for-File-Sharing

      Thanks. This looks like a great instruction sheet.  I’ll go through it as time allows me to address the problem.

    • #2485750

      until the Windows network connectivity problem is resolved.

      I gave up on Microsoft fixing networking bugs after switching from Windows 7 to Windows 10.
      My solution was to give each device on the network a fixed IP and adding devices to quick access.

      That has been my workaround for a long while. It gets the job done in an awkward kind of way.

      I have just always liked having my network working the way it should be. All the way back to Win for WG.

    • #2485751

      Our Windows 10 machines can see each other fine (Explorer->Desktop->Network) in our private network. Each machine has the same Windows account name and password for one account.

      Are all hosts a member of the same workgroup? (Settings->About->Advanced system settings->Computer Name).

      Running the Windows Network Troubleshooter is worth a try but typically does not find any problems.

      You reviewed “Advanced Sharing Settings” on each machine. (Settings->Network & Internet->Network and Sharing Center->Change advanced sharing settings)

      For network trouble shooting, start to figure out what network layer is failing. For connection issues, my network troubleshooting starts off with ping by IP address. Run ipconfig, also issued from a command prompt. Collect all the IP4 addresses from the machines and ping each other from each machine. See what’s working and/or failing.

      In the meantime, share files using your NAS, until the Windows network connectivity problem is resolved.

      Thanks for the information.  I’ll go through these steps as my time allows.

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