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  • WIN 7 administrator password

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 7 Questions: Windows 7 WIN 7 administrator password

    This topic contains 186 replies, has 26 voices, and was last updated by  mledman 4 days, 6 hours ago.

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    • #206158 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I sent this question to Woody.  He said he didn’t know the answer but someone else might.

      I’m stuck and am hoping you can point me in a direction to get my little WIN 7 notebook going again.
      I have been trying stuff since April when I downloaded the big update from Microsoft.
      I have read everything I can find on Ask Woody. I have also downloaded and tried to use other things posted on the Internet.
      I’m only trying to get one thing repaired…administrator password.
      When I bought the little machine, it offered an option to create an administrator password. I chose not to do it. So, anytime I was installing or removing software and was asked for an administrator password, I hit “continue” and whatever was supposed to happen did.
      The Microsoft update must have installed a password, but since I didn’t install it, I have no idea what it is.

      I have tried to take out the password they installed, but I have to have the password to get into command prompt. When I go to bios, the option to change the administrator password is locked.

      I looked at chrome books. Most don’t seem to have USB ports and won’t run PowerPoint if I had one to plug in a jump drive with slide shows on it. I have about 25 years of PPT programs. Most of them are seldom used but are like an archive from which I can borrow slides and insert into current programs. Many are pretty large files.

      If you can point me to help, I surely would appreciate it.

      Edit to remove HTML. Please use the “Text” tab in the entry box when you copy/paste.

      William Sharp

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #206190 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Bill, Which update do you think has created this problem?

      I do have a password for the PC, to log in as “User”, and the same as “Administrator”: this is not the real Admin password, that is a secret. It happens to be like that because, at least this is my theory, this password in Win 7 Home and Pro is a leftover from the main business version of which all other versions of Windows 7 are downmarket knock offs. Be that as it may, the real Admin password in the business version was only for the company’s System Administrator, and the employees were not supposed to know it, to make sure they were unable to tamper with the operating system.

      In my own experience, I have never been asked to use a password when clicking on “Run as Administrator” and, from your posting, I gather neither have you, until now. So am really interested to hear what might be causing your problem to avoid it, if possible.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

      • #206239 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        My problem began shortly after I downloaded the monthly roll up in April (2018).  The machine is a Toshiba NB505 with WIN 7 Pro. I am the only one that uses it.  It is not part of a network.  I use it to run PowerPoint presentations.  I would like to sync it to my Google Drive account, but it wants an administrator password to permit the sync download.

        I’m 74.  I have limited computer skills.  I can follow instructions pretty well.

        William Sharp

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #206196 Reply

      PaulK
      AskWoody Lounger

      Most of the question pertains to the Windows Administrator-credentialed user logon, and I think that this is that for which you are requesting help.

      But just to clarify: “When I go to bios, the option to change the administrator password is locked.” This is a different Administrator.

      When I go to my BIOS Security tab there are two password fields that can be set.
      An Administrator password permits one to lock out the possibility of changing these BIOS passwords. This is not related to an OS password.
      A Power-On password permits one to require a password before the computer can be booted into an OS.

      The use of the unqualified word ‘Administrator’ is ambiguous. In a max-passwords scenario one would have at least three distinct passwords: BIOS Administrator, BIOS Power-On, OS (e.g., Windows) ‘Administrator’. In addition, each defined ‘standard’ user could have his own distinct password. (And, applications also may have password capabilities.)

      “When I go to bios, the option to change the administrator password is locked.”
      If this statement is as it appears to be, then the BIOS Administrator password has been set, and is a different challenge than the one you have concerning software installation.

      Are you the only one who uses the computer, or who does updating?

      You may be able to log on to the built-in Administrator by booting into Safe mode.
      A couple of Google search [ windows 7 safe mode administrator ] hits are:
      https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/102552-built-administrator-enable-winre.html
      https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/682-command-prompt-startup.html
      Note that some information applies only for 32-bit systems.
      Warning: Registry editing can be disastrous; get more-expert help if you are not comfortable.

      Concerning the BIOS Administrator password – what is the make/model of the computer?

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #206249 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      Bill, if you want to change the “Administrator” account’s password, you will need to be logged in on an account with administrator rights. Once you have done that, open File Explorer and right click on Computer, then choose Manage. Now click on Users and Groups, then Users. You will see the Administrator account listed there. Right-click on it, and then change the password. You can ignore the warnings that you will see.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #206284 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Jim, I get as far as manage and then am asked for a password…which I don’t have.  I can’t get to the next step (users).

      William Sharp

      • #206295 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        That’s because you are logging in with less than administrator rights. Is there an account on your computer that you can log on with that has administrator rights? For example, that account that it keeps prompting you for the password of.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #206307 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      It sounds like your account is a Standard user account, not an Administrator.
      (You may have a separate Administrator account on the machine.)

      Try this:

      • Press Window key + R to bring up the Run window
        Type lusrmgr.msc and hit enter (This should bring up Local Users and Groups)
      • On the left, click on the Users folder. In the middle, double click on your account which is probably your first name.
      • Under the Member Of tab, are you a member of Administrators or Users?

      If you are an Administrator, you can change the Administrator account password by going back to the Users > middle panel, right-clicking on Administrator, and choosing Set Password.

      If your account is a User account, you cannot reset passwords. You also are then getting the UAC prompt because you are a User account but you’re trying to change things that require Admin privileges. You can either 1) change your user account to be an Administrator account (which has to be done with another Administrator account), or 2) you can try to use a rescue disc such as Hiren’s Boot CD to reset the password.

      Download link: https://www.hirensbootcd.org/download/ (scroll down, the ISO link is next to Filename)
      How-to: https://www.hirensbootcd.org/faq-items/resetting-windows-password/

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #206407 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        I got very close (I think).  After putting in the lsgrmgr.msc I was able to click through to the page that has users and groups. In the middle column I see all user accounts including administrator.  To it’s right there is “Built-in account for administering the computer/domain.” Clicking on administrator, I go to a page that has options like “password never expires” and “account is disabled.”  I unchecked the “disabled” box and tried to click the apply box and am taken to a screen that says “access is denied.” Trying to make changes to user accounts brings up the same screen.

        If I double click on “administrator” I can get to a “member of” tab that shows administrator is a member of administrators and users. I tried deleting “user” but get the “access denied” screen.

        William Sharp

    • #206310 Reply

      The Surfing Pensioner
      AskWoody Plus

      I don’t know whether this may help.

      https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=how+to+bypass+request+for+administrator+password+on+Windows+7+Pro&&view=detail&mid=A414520FD95950236E7CA414520FD95950236E7C&&FORM=VDRVRV&ajf=100

      Forgive me if you’ve already tried it without success, but it would appear to offer a workable solution.

      • #206315 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        @zero2dash   @the-surfing-pensioner

        Please be sure the solutions you are offering are legitimate. Woody doesn’t like to reference non-legit software on the blog

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #206336 Reply

          The Surfing Pensioner
          AskWoody Plus

          I’m sorry, I have followed the tutorial through twice and can find no reference to non-legit software, or indeed any third-party software. There is an advert at a couple of points on the video, but I disregarded that much as I disregard Woody’s.  The advert is not relevant to the recovery method suggested.

          • #206379 Reply

            GoneToPlaid
            AskWoody Plus

            The video does show a widely known legitimate solution (many web pages present this solution), yet it applies only to resetting a User’s login password (regardless of whether or not the User has only User rights or Admin rights. This is not Bill’s issue. Bill’s issue is that he needs to reset the Win7 Admin password, whereas Bill already can log in on his Win7 computer using his account which which only has User rights. This is the twist which Bill is presently encountering with his Toshiba laptop. Bill only has User rights after logging into Windows. Bill does not have Admin rights, and Bill has no idea what the Admin password is for Admin access on his Win7 Toshiba laptop computer.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #206311 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      before the problem, I had four user accounts…me, my wife, my daughter and guest.  When I try to sign on to my account, I immediately get a request for a password.  I have a password that I assigned for all user accounts in bios.  In the past, all I did was click on the icon for my account and it opened.  Now, I can click on the icon of my daughter.  I am not asked for a password and immediately get to the desktop for her account.  Because that account apparently is not one that has administrator rights, I can’t add or delete programs.

      When I go to control panel in her account and click on users, it only shows her account.  I will do whatever is needed to activate the administrator account.  The machine came preloaded with WIN 7 Pro.  I don’t have a recovery disc. Woody got me started with Windows (3.1) about a million years ago.  Since then I’ve ventured through WIN 95, 98, XP Vista, 7 and 10.  I don’t like formatting the hard drive but I’ve done it a few times (especially when I was running 95).  I’m just hoping to find a “go around.”

      William Sharp

      • #206328 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        The password you see in the BIOS has NOTHING to do with the passwords required to log on to Windows. They are two different things. BIOS passwords belong ONLY t othe BIOS, Windows passwords belong only to Windows.

        If one of the other Users is an Administer account, you can change passwirds with it. Log in with any account, go to Control Panel\User Accounts.\Manage Another Account. That will list the accounts on the computer. If any one is an Administer, use that one to change your password.

        Log in with the account that is Admin. In the “run” box type “lusrmgr.msc” (without quotes). In the box that pops up, click on Users, then click on your ID. When it opens, on the “Member of” tab add Administrators. On the General tab (check boxes) be sure the account is not disabled or locked out, be sure to uncheck the box “User can’t change password, checl password never expires. Close the box. Right click on your ID and choose “Set password” (to something you know).

        Reboot the computer and log in.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #206355 Reply

          GoneToPlaid
          AskWoody Plus

          Actually, for Bill’s Toshiba NB505 laptop computer, his laptop’s UEFI BIOS does have a feature to set the Windows login password in BIOS. Up until today and after doing some online research, I was completely unaware that such a feature existed.

          • #206378 Reply

            anonymous

            We have something similar on some small form factor HP units as well.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #206383 Reply

              GoneToPlaid
              AskWoody Plus

              Yeah, I saw this as well, while doing online research, with regards to HP computers.

          • #206448 Reply

            PaulK
            AskWoody Lounger

            Setting a Windows user password within BIOS?

            The Toshiba NB500 Series User Guide is downloadable from
            https://support.toshiba.com/support/modelHome?freeText=2861099&osId=31 .
            Pages 127-130 cover Setting Passwords.
            The wording is confusing: a careful reading shows that the ‘User’ password refers to the ‘Power-On’ password, and also to authorization to do hardware setup.

            According to https://support.toshiba.com/support/viewContentDetail?contentId=4009426 , Windows 7 uses BIOS; UEFI applies to Windows 8.

            Posts #206196 and #206328 emphasize the distinction between BIOS passwords and Operating System passwords. What is a possible source of confusion too is that these BIOS passwords can be set from within Windows (User Guide, p. 128).

            The computer is single user: single (not domain, no network) computer.
            The computer is not single-user: multiple Windows users. In post #206311 he lists: me, wife, daughter, guest.

            He also says “I have a password that I assigned for all user accounts in bios.” I find this quite baffling: this sounds like the Power On password.

            Somehow the ‘me’ account (apparently originally an Administrator account) has been given a Windows password. How to recover from this is the real problem. The advice given by GoneToPlaid (#206354) is a good summary of options.

    • #206317 Reply

      geekdom
      AskWoody Plus

      Take your computer and go to your local down-home computer shop. (You don’t want a big-box or boiler-plate shop; you want a computer technician.) Explain your problem. Have the computer shop set things to rights and explain to you what was done. Sometimes computer procedures just don’t fit through flat-print online computer explanations very well.

      G{ot backup} TestBeta
      offline▸Win7Pro • SP1 • x64 • InUse
      online▸Win10Pro • 1909.18363.693 • x64 • i5-9400 • RAM8GB • HDD • CanonMG3620 • Firefox74.08b • Windows{Defender/SystemImage/RescueDisk/Firewall}
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #211228 Reply

        anonymous

        I’m about ready to do that.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #206323 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      @zero2dash @the-surfing-pensioner

      Please be sure the solutions you are offering are legitimate. Woody doesn’t like to reference non-legit software on the blog

      Understood – I’ve used Hiren’s BootCD in the past many times; it is legitimate, legal and free.
      Also, from their About page:
      https://www.hirensbootcd.org/about/
      “Hiren’s BootCD PE does not contain any malicious software and it does not contain any pirated software. It includes only free, safe and legal software.”

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #206335 Reply

      anonymous

      I seem to recall when updating from win7 to win10, win10 really really wanted me to have a microsoft account. Since I had an old hotmail account (now outlook.com) I used that info to set up the account on the machine and set it to log in automatically. If you have a microsoft account of some sort you might try the credentials used for it.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #206354 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      My problem began shortly after I downloaded the monthly roll up in April (2018). The machine is a Toshiba NB505 with WIN 7 Pro. I am the only one that uses it. It is not part of a network. I use it to run PowerPoint presentations. I would like to sync it to my Google Drive account, but it wants an administrator password to permit the sync download. I’m 74. I have limited computer skills. I can follow instructions pretty well.

      Hi Bill,

      Are you able to boot Win7 in Safe Mode? I ask because Safe Mode is more reliable when performing a System Restore or when uninstalling a bad update. If you can boot into Safe Mode, great! If not, proceed anyway. The first thing to try is to uninstall the April update. I hope that simply uninstalling the April update will fix everything for you.

      If, after uninstalling the April update and rebooting, you still find that you are encountering the same issues, then the next thing to possibly try will be a System Restore point which was saved either just before or perhaps several days before you installed the April update.

      Alternatively, you might try restoring to a December 2017 restore point, in order to wipe out all of the buggy 2018 updates. Don’t do so, until after you have copied and saved all important stuff (files, projects, et cetera) to external media, so that you don’t lose this stuff after restoring to December 2017. If your issues are resolved after restoring to December 2017, don’t do anything in terms of reinstalling any post Dec 2017 updates! We will figure that one out later.

      You DO NOT WANT TO TOUCH OR RESET ANY BIOS SETTINGS AT ALL, except for simply checking, after performing the first or both of the above, whether or not the Windows Password screen is still locked. Hopefully it will become unlocked.

      If you get to this point, where your issues are resolved, please don’t do anything else until we can figure out what the next steps should be. The upshot is that we will want to disable your Toshiba laptop’s UEFI Windows Password feature and instead use Windows’ built-in password feature, since Microsoft obviously forgot about this scenario with regards to the April updates.

      If worse comes to worse, and you have to reinstall Win7, and you didn’t create installation media, at least your Toshiba NB505 offers a way to restore your Toshiba NB505 to a factory default installation.

      Best regards,

      –GTP

    • #206363 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      I seem to recall when updating from win7 to win10, win10 really really wanted me to have a microsoft account. Since I had an old hotmail account (now outlook.com) I used that info to set up the account on the machine and set it to log in automatically. If you have a microsoft account of some sort you might try the credentials used for it.

      Hello Bill,

      Anon just mentioned something which is potentially useful. Do you have a MS Live account which was, perhaps, created if you installed MS Office 365 on your laptop computer? If so, your Live account password might be the new Admin password on your Toshiba laptop computer. Just a guess, yet worth trying.

      Best regards,

      –GTP

       

      • #206822 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        This old machine has only had Office 7.  Like Win 7, it works for me.  Have not installed 365.

        William Sharp

    • #206430 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Having asked for some clarification as to what might be causing Bill’s problem, I’m thankful to all of you posting here in reply to Bill, because you have made clear, as has Bill, that what might have caused the problem was in the Rollup. I am not worried about problems caused by Rollups, because I always update Group B-style. Besides, the problem seems to be that Bill was not asked previously to login with a password and now, suddenly has started to be asked to do so. In my case, all my machines are password protected, so I always login with a password: nothing new for me there. I really hope this is the end of my concerns on this issue. Others might also be well served from following this discussion, if they are likely to have this problem because they are Group A, install the monthly Rollup, and have their account set up the same as Bill’s.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

    • #206464 Reply

      jstech
      AskWoody Lounger

      This can be accomplished with sticky keys. It’s a nice trick for those who are familiar with the cmd line. You will need a Win XP/7/10 disc. Lots of documentation on it if you google it. Once you have the sticky keys exploit in place, you can create an administrator account from the cmd line with the following commands:

      net user /add [username] [password]

      new localgroup administrators [username] /add

      Group A | Windows 7 Pro 64-bit | Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #206479 Reply

      SkipH
      AskWoody Plus

      @Bill:

      If you have CD/DVD drive on your laptop (or access to one on another computer), you might want to try the software explained and discussed at this website. The download link is at the end of the article.

      https://www.lifewire.com/offline-nt-password-and-registry-editor-review-2626147

      Link to web page to download the ISO file:

      http://pogostick.net/~pnh/ntpasswd/bootdisk.html

      There’s further information on this web page.

      It is free, and I have used it many times in the past to REMOVE a user’s password. The current version I use does show and allow clearing a potentially ‘invisible’ Administrator account.

      You will have to burn the contents of the ISO file inside the ZIP file to a CD, or, make a bootable USB thumb drive, my go-to utility for that is called Rufus, find it here: http://rufus.akeo.ie/

      This utility CLEARS/REMOVES one or more user password so you can just log in by clicking on the user name on the log in screen.

      After saving the modified SAM file, re-boot and remove the CD or USB and wait for Windows to boot back up, click on your name and you should get right in to your Desktop.

      At that point you can go to the regular User Account Control Panel app and put in a new password for your account. The built-in ‘Administrator’ account is not visible in the standard User Accounts app, but is accessible from the Computer Management app. So you could put in a new password for the built-in Administrator account, or just leave it blank. You can Set any new password by right-clicking on the user name.

    • #206597 Reply

      PaulK
      AskWoody Lounger

      Probably a rabbit trail.
      Is it possible that the unknown password is just a simple blank (space bar)? Or 2 spaces?
      I just tested both of these possibilities, I wouldn’t have thought that these would be acceptable.

      • #206721 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        I wanted so much for the answer to my problem to be something a really old guy might do.

        I tried.  It didn’t get me where I need to go.

        William Sharp

    • #206603 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks to all you trying to help me.  I have gotten close (I think) a couple of times, but I’m still blocked on changing or removing the administrator password.  I can’t download or delete any programs that require administrator approval.

      Thanks to zero2dash I got to the accounts and added administrator to a couple of them.
      (

      You may have a separate Administrator account on the machine.

      Press Window key + R to bring up the Run window
      Type lusrmgr.msc and hit enter (This should bring up Local Users and Groups)

      On the left, click on the Users folder. In the middle, double click on your account which is probably your first name.

      Under the Member Of tab, are you a member of Administrators or Users?

      If you are an Administrator, you can change the Administrator account password by going back to the Users > middle panel, right-clicking on Administrator, and choosing Set Password.</p>
      If your account is a User account, you cannot reset passwords.

      I have also tried just about every password I have ever used.  I just can’t kill of the administrator password thing.  Some suggestions talked of getting into command prompt.  Because of the absence of a password, I can’t do those.  I looked at user accounts in control panel.  I am only permitted to see the account I’m signed on to.  I’m open to just about anything.

      William Sharp

    • #206687 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      There should be no restrictions on downloading as this does not require special privileges. What errors are you getting?

      Have you tried the password reset software mentioned by SkipH?

      WIN 7 administrator password

      cheers, Paul

    • #206791 Reply

      anonymous

      This is my first venture into asking for help on Ask Woody,  I have been blown away by the number of suggestion for what to do.  I still don’t have the problem solved but have gotten a look at all the very strange things people have learned about how to tackle problems with Microsoft.

      My latest attempts to change the administrator password brought up a screen that told me that administrator is disabled.  I can uncheck the box, but when I click apply, I’m getting a screen that tells me change can’t be made.

      Before the April 7 roll up, I sometimes saw a screen that told me I need administrator permission, but all I did was click continue and whatever I wanted to do…did.

      For anyone following this, I still need help

      • #206851 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        My latest attempts to change the administrator password brought up a screen that told me that administrator is disabled. I can uncheck the box, but when I click apply, I’m getting a screen that tells me change can’t be made. Before the April 7 roll up, I sometimes saw a screen that told me I need administrator permission, but all I did was click continue and whatever I wanted to do…did. For anyone following this, I still need help

        Hmm. Try this…

        Go to Control Panel and double-click on Administrative Tools. Then double-click on Computer Management.

        In Computer Management and in the left pane, click on Local Users and Groups to expand that group. Then click on Users.

        Double-click on Administrator. The is the built-in Administrator account for Windows itself. In the Administrator Properties popup window, uncheck “User cannot change password” and “Account is disabled”. Make sure that “Password never expires remains checked. Hopefully the “Account is locked out” is not checked. If so, uncheck that.

        Then click Apply and see what happens. Hopefully you were able to active the Win7’s Administrator account. If so, do the following:

        Go back to Control Panel and double-click on User Accounts. The Administrator account should now be displayed along with your user account and the Guest account. Double-click on Administrator and see if you can either set a password, or change the password. As a user with non-admin rights, I am not sure if you will be able to do either. If you can set a password create a password which is at least 11 characters long and which consists of characters and digits, and at least one special character such as an asterisk. Write down the password first, before you set the password!

        Assuming that you were able to enable the Administrator account and set a password, do the following…

        Close everything, log off of Windows (don’t reboot), and log back in by clicking on the Administrator account icon and typing in the password. You should now be logged on as an Administrator.

        Go back to Control Panel and double-click on User Accounts. Double-click on your user account so that you can make changes to your user account. Double-click on “Change the account type” and change your user account type to Administrator. Then change your account’s password, as described above, but don’t use the same password. Again, write down this password!

        Assuming that you were able to change your user account to an administrator account and set a new password, do the following…

        Close everything, log off of Windows (don’t reboot), and log back in by clicking on your account icon and typing in the new password for your user account. You should now be logged on as an Administrator. Go to Control Panel and then to User Accounts, and verify that your user account is now an administrator account.

        IMPORTANT!!!!! Now we must disable the built-in Administrator account for Windows…

        Go to Control Panel and double-click on Administrative Tools. Then double-click on Computer Management.

        In Computer Management and in the left pane, click on Local Users and Groups to expand that group. Then click on Users.

        Double-click on Administrator. Add a check mark for “Account is disabled” in order to disable the Administrator account. Click Apply and then click Okay.

        Hopefully all of this will have resolved your issue.

        Best regards,

        –GTP

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #206905 Reply

          jstech
          AskWoody Lounger

          This is what I was getting at. If you boot from a system disc, the sticky keys route will allow you to create a new administrator from an elevated (admin) command prompt. You would be able to log in with this newly created admin and fix the old one. Like another poster said, it’s not easy to explain all the steps thoroughly.

          Group A | Windows 7 Pro 64-bit | Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
    • #206804 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      You haven’t told us if you have tried the external password reset?

      cheers, Paul

    • #206882 Reply

      anonymous

      Be sure this is Pro not home win 7

    • #206913 Reply

      anonymous

      @gonetoplaid you need admin rights to do all of that, and it appears that Bill is not a member of the Administrators group.  Were there any other local user accounts with admin rights on his computer, he would’ve seen them in the UAC prompts.  In sum, it appears that the only account on his computer with admin rights is the built-in Administrator account, and that account is disabled, so he’s stuck.

      @Bill, since you don’t have a recovery disk, and presumably don’t have an installation dvd, you need to follow the procedure given in the video linked to in reply #206310.  It’s hard to argue that this procedure isn’t “legitimate” since it uses only software provided by Microsoft, just not in a way that Microsoft intended.  After rebooting and hitting the shift key 5 times to pop open the cmd window, type:

      net user administrator /active:yes
      net user administrator *

      then type a password for the administrator (twice), exit the cmd window and reboot. When the reboot is finished, you now know the password for user Administrator, and in fact you’ll be able to login as user Administrator from the login screen (although I’m not recommending that). There’s really no pressing need to re-disable the Administrator account, but if you want to, you’ll need to first add your user account (Bill, I presume) to the Administrators group.  Post back when you get to that point and someone will tell you how to do that, and tell you how to undo the changes made by following the video.

      It goes without saying that your important personal files should be backed up before doing any of the above.  16G SanDisk memory sticks are available for $5 or so at places like Best Buy.

       

       

      • #206986 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        My machine runs on WIN 7 Pro SP1.  It has an Intel Atom processor.

        I can boot to WIN 7.  I can’t add or delete any programs that require administrator approval.

        I have 6 user accounts:  Administrator, Bub (my daughter), Guest, Mary (my wife), Home Group, and Toshita NB500.

        I now sign on using Bub… because it’s the only one that doesn’t ask for administrator permission.  I always can sign on.

        The administrator and Toshiba accounts are both part of the administrator group.  The others aren’t.

        The administrator account has two blocks checked…”password never expires” and “account is denied.”  When I uncheck the “account is denied and then click “apply” I get the screen that says “access is denied.”

        I can’t find a way to create or change the administrator password.

        Again, thanks for staying with me on this.  By comparison, there are much bigger issues going on in the world, but this like the princess and the pea for me.

        William Sharp

        • #206989 Reply

          The Surfing Pensioner
          AskWoody Plus

          I suppose you have tried unchecking “password never expires” and clicking “apply”? After all, we should all like the password to expire. It’s a silly suggestion, but I’ve clean run out of sensible ideas.

        • #207014 Reply

          GoneToPlaid
          AskWoody Plus

          Try this…

          If your Bub account is truly an Administrator account, then you should be able to change all of the other accounts to Administrator accounts. Perhaps, start with trying this first, and then reporting back to us.

          Hey man, we are all trying to help you, as this is what this wonderful world of AskWoody is all about.

          Best regards,

          –Michael

           

    • #206993 Reply

      anonymous

      Bill, reply #206913 tells you what you need to do to enable the Administrator account and set a password for it.  Good luck.

      • #207016 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus
        • #207595 Reply

          anonymous

          Oooh, nice catch GTP!  I cloned a win7 pro vm with a single user and a disabled Administrator account.  I then enabled the Administrator account and logged in once as Administrator.  While logged in as Administrator, I removed the user from the Administrators group and disabled the Administrator account by running “net user administrator /active:no” in a cmd window. After a reboot, things were as they now are for Bill, i.e. Administrator locked out and no other user with admin rights.

          I rebooted, this time tapping the f8 key to get into safe mode (the first safe mode option).  Behold, an Administrator icon was on the login screen!  In safe mode, I was able to log on as Administrator and undo the damage be adding the original user to the Administrators group.

          Thank you GTP, this is very handy to know.

          Bill, please reboot your computer while tapping the f8 key continuously until you see a black and white screen.  On that screen, select ‘Safe Mode’ and hit enter.  After the rest of the boot process completes, we hope you’ll see an Administrator icon on the login screen and be able to log on as Administrator by clicking it.  You’ll probably have to provide whatever password you were using in the past.  If you can get this far,  open a command window (cmd.exe).  In it type “net user administrator /active:yes” and then reboot the computer.  You should then see an Administrator icon on the login screen and be back where you were before.

           

           

          • #207618 Reply

            zero2dash
            AskWoody Lounger

            In the OP he stated that he does not know the Administrator account password, which is why he asked if he could reset it. Unfortunately this means that reenabling the Administrator account won’t get him any closer to resolution.

            • #207624 Reply

              anonymous

              True, but many confusing things have been said in this thread.  If I’m not mis-reading everything, Bill has been logging in as Administrator as a matter of course, up until that account was mysteriously locked out back in April.  If so, then either that account never had a password (the default) or it did and he knew what it was and will hopefully remember it.  It’s certainly easy enough to try.

              And yes, running as Administrator is, to say the least, undesirable, but as PaulK points out there could be many of Bill’s files associated with that account by now.  Getting him back to where he was would be a victory.

          • #207619 Reply

            GoneToPlaid
            AskWoody Plus

            I just tried that. I booted into Safe Mode, yet I didn’t get an icon for my disabled Administrator account, only an icon for my own account. I think that the reason this worked for you is because there was no other account available, other than your disabled Administrator account.

            • #207622 Reply

              anonymous

              Yes, probably because your account is a member of group Administrators.  If there is any other account available with Administrators group membership, then the locked-out Administrator account is not shown on the welcome screen after booting into safe mode.  When no other accounts are available which are members of Administrators, then Administrator is shown on the welcome screen after a safe boot.  I certainly could be missing something, but I’ve tried this a number of times by now, and it works every time.  Independent verification would be nice, if you’re so inclined 🙂

              I hope that Bill tries this and that it works for him, because really the only other viable alternative is to hack in as per reply 206913.

    • #207008 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      I now sign on using Bub… because it’s the only one that doesn’t ask for administrator permission. I always can sign on.

      Most likely your UAC prompt is for a software update of some sorts, that has updated under the Bub account. That seems likely since:

      The administrator and Toshiba accounts are both part of the administrator group. The others aren’t.

      This means Bub is not an admin privileges account.

      Unfortunately from the Windows perspective, with what you have available, you are SOL – unless you can find a Toshiba account password. That may be standardized somehow, I would assume it is, since they’re probably a generic account that they use in the set up of their PC’s. However, whether you can actually find out what that password is, is anyone’s guess.

      I would again suggest using the Hiren CD which will let you reset that password. The issue that you have is, Windows encrypts its passwords. (Most OS’ do.) There is no way for you to recover that password, without a password recovery disc. You cannot make a password recovery disc without knowing the password to create it in the first place; in other words, at this point, you cannot create this disc to actually reset that password. It’s too late. It would have had to have been created already before this point, and obviously it hasn’t been. The Hiren CD has a Windows password reset tool that will basically go where the password is stored, encrypted, and reset it for you. You may not feel comfortable using that disc, and I get that, but I’m afraid (or at least IMHO), that is your only option at this point without losing data. Obviously you can reformat the HDD and reinstall Windows, but that will wipe your data.

    • #207026 Reply

      PaulK
      AskWoody Lounger

      Situation summary:
      Multiple user accounts defined, presumably all with data; only one standard account accessible; Bill’s non-accessible Administrator account has years’ worth of files.

      Recovery, the last resort:
      A – locate another Windows 7 system
      B – get an external drive enclosure (uses USB connection)
      — examine existing hard drive, it probably is SATA; get external enclosure to match
      — someone else here can recommend source and model
      C – remove hard drive, install into enclosure, connect to ‘another’ system
      D – copy off all data desired from all accounts
      — note: another external drive needed for data storage; or multiple DVDs?
      — be sure to copy off files that contain internet passwords
      — start a new topic to pursue this
      E – reinstall drive to own computer
      F – recover to original factory image – see the User Guide, pages 49-58
      G – rebuild system – install applications, etc.
      H – redefine current users’ profiles; and folder trees?
      I – selectively restore data from ‘storage’ drive – and DVDs?

      • #207764 Reply

        PaulK
        AskWoody Lounger

        Corrections and emendations —
        A – locate another Windows 7_or_later system; the bittedness (32 or 64) doesn’t matter
        I don’t know why I constrained that to just 7.

        The existing C: disk is formatted in NTFS.
        D – There is a choice of media for the target (copy-to) device.
        If a hard disk, it also should be NTFS, although ex-FAT or FAT-32 will work. (FAT-32 is limited to files < 4GB.)
        Reference: Do an internet Search for [ ntfs ], and sub-search subjects of interest.
        After this whole exercise is complete, this recovery-disk may be used as an archive.

        G – After the ‘original factory image’ (item F) is done and you get to the point of installing updates and patches, look for guidance in the Patches Forum here.

        Presently the PPT folders and files are in “My Documents” – on the now-inaccessible account.
        Suggestion: unless there is a need to limit access, consider in the future to put them in C:\Users\Public\[Documents or Pictures or Videos or define-your-own-Folder-name]. Anyone can access them (yes, or change them too).

    • #207705 Reply

      anonymous

      You guys are fantastic.  Such patience you’ve shown to a guy who is older than dirt. I have tried just about everything recommended.  Among other things, I went to Hiren’s and found it is only offered for 64-bit…my machine is 32-bit.  My little computer is WIN 7 Pro, SP1.  It seems that no matter what I try, I can’t get past administrator is disabled.  This is the only machine I have that is WIN 7.  The others are WIN 10.

      I think I might as well buy an emergency boot disc.  I understand I will lose all my files but just about all of them are backed up on Google Drive.  It will just take a lot of time reinstalling files like Microsoft Office, Acrobat and other tools.  I have spent many days reinstalling programs…mostly in WIN 95…what a mess that was.

      How much info do I need to buy the correct boot disc?

      • #207733 Reply

        zero2dash
        AskWoody Lounger

        Bear with me, I have an idea. I’ll edit this post but I may be able to assist you with getting one for free…I have an idea on how to create one and get it to you so I’m creating a VM right now. Hold that thought…

        Ah dangit…can’t be done.
        https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-security/can-you-make-a-password-reset-disk-on-one-computer/048f5f83-18c4-4747-b130-9d8cccad969b?auth=1

        Sorry 🙁

        • #207738 Reply

          Bill
          AskWoody Plus

          I’m a moderately patient guy.  I have been working on this since April.  I have watched a gob of YouTube videos.  They all make it look so easy to go into command prompt, make a couple of changes and voila all is well.  The key, of course, is having an administrator password to begin the process.

          Woody (my nephew) has pulled away from real issues sometimes to respond to my whining and told me to give it up and get a chrome book. The only thing I use this little notebook for is playing PowerPoint programs when my wife is speaking.  I could take another laptop that has WIN 10 but this little guy is tiny and easy to transport.

          So, your help is deeply appreciated.

          William Sharp

          • #207747 Reply

            GoneToPlaid
            AskWoody Plus

            Hi Bill,

            At this point, it is seriously looking like your only solution is to reinstall Windows, and to avoid using Tohiba’s BIOS Windows password stuff for Windows in the future, as it appears that there is no other available solution.

            SEPARATELY, A NOTE TO ALL: My company bought four identical laptop computers, in terms of actual hardware. All had identical BIOS versions. One of these four identical computers had Win7 installed, and the other three had Win8.1 installed. Here is the thing. Windows 8.1, forever and irreversibly changed the BIOS settings, such that it is impossible to make any of the three computers which came with Win 8.1 installed to show the same configurable BIOS settings which are shown in the hardware identical computer which came with Win 7 installed. I tried reflashing the BIOS with the same version which was present on the three laptops which had Windows 8.1 installed, yet after doing so, I can’t get these BIOSes to show the same configurable settings which are shown in the same identical hardware laptop which has Win7 installed.

            The upshot is that it appears that Microsoft writes to, post Win7 and within the BIOS, areas in the BIOS which do not get reflashed even when reflashing using an OEM BIOS file.

            This is just a heads up. Do your own research to verify my above comments.

            Best regards.

            –GTP

             

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #207997 Reply

              Bill
              AskWoody Plus

              Well guys, I’m inching closer.  I have now learned that beginning in 2007 Toshiba quit making separate emergency boot discs.  Instead the program to reboot to original factory settings is in a partitioned part of the hard disc.  Theoretically, if I hold down the zero key while the machine is booting, I will be taken to a menu that guides me through formatting and installation.  I haven’t been able to get this to work yet because of my overlying problem…administrator is disabled.

              I’m learning the old bromide that “close only counts in horseshoes and grenades” should be amended to include repairing WIN 7.

              William Sharp

            • #208005 Reply

              Rick Corbett
              AskWoody_MVP

              Well guys, I’m inching closer. I have now learned that beginning in 2007 Toshiba quit making separate emergency boot discs. Instead the program to reboot to original factory settings is in a partitioned part of the hard disc. Theoretically, if I hold down the zero key while the machine is booting, I will be taken to a menu that guides me through formatting and installation. I haven’t been able to get this to work yet because of my overlying problem…administrator is disabled.

              This would have been an OEM Vista recovery partition and no doubt wiped by whoever put Win 7 Ultimate on… so not much help even it did work.

              In my opinion SkipH gave you the best tried-and-tested solution most likely to succeed many days ago (July 27) in post #206479.

              Hope this helps…

            • #208031 Reply

              GoneToPlaid
              AskWoody Plus

              Hi Bill,

              For the Administrator password, try four spaces. Yep, four spaces supposedly is the default for many Toshiba laptops.

              Best regards,

              –GTP

               

    • #207771 Reply

      Rick Corbett
      AskWoody_MVP

      I recommend SkipH’s reply. I’ve used the Offline Windows Password & Registry Editor, Bootdisk / CD for many years and it has always worked to remove any Windows passwords. Most times the default settings are fine so it’s just a case of reading the prompts and pressing ENTER.

      Just 2 points to note… 1.) the laptop *must* be shut down properly (i.e. Start > Shutdown), not just powered down by holding the on/off button and; 2.) the laptop must be able to boot from CD or USB.

      I believe the boot menu key for the Toshiba NB500 is F12, i.e. power on the laptop and press F12 when the Toshiba logo appears. (If you can’t get the boot menu to appear then you’ll need to amend the boot order in the BIOS.)

      In terms of ‘ease of use’, I would suggest creating a CD rather than a bootable USB.

      Hope this helps… (and yes, it’s legal.)

    • #208988 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks to all of you who spent valuable time trying to get me reconnected to my administrator password.  I still have not solved the problem but have become frustrated trying.

      Perhaps my attitude will improve later and I will try again. Until then, thank you for trying to help me.

      Bill

      William Sharp

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #209443 Reply

        jstech
        AskWoody Lounger

        Can you create a system repair disc?

        Start, All Programs, Maintenance, Create a system repair disc. Or if you have any disc W7 or up (8.1, 10) that you can boot from.

        Group A | Windows 7 Pro 64-bit | Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
    • #209404 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      One last request from Bill Sharp

      My situation has become more complicated.  The clock on the computer is not correct so when I try to go to the Internet, I get an error message saying I am not permitted because information on the net is sensitive and will not be provided to folks who don’t have the correct date and time.  But, because I don’t have a password, the clock program won’t allow me to change the time.

      I have given up on the password fix.  Now I want to format the hard drive and just reinstall programs.  My knowledge of command prompts is very limited.  If you know of a way I can clear the machine and start over, I will appreciate learning what to do.

      William Sharp

      • #209435 Reply

        anonymous

        This sends us in a new direction, and may deserve a new title. But here I will observe that while I did not do the homework to be familiar with the Toshiba NB505, what you describe is indicative of clock battery failure. While it is a minor symptom, I do not know if this is considered replaceable on this model of notebook. It may be adding to the accumulated difficulties of an aging unit, and foretell greater difficulties to come.

        Is the often suggested LibreOffice a viable replacement to display your PowerPoint decks? It may not satisfy all your needs. But if it does this opens more possibilities for replacing the notebook hardware. And there are many voices here to help with that style of question.

      • #209446 Reply

        anonymous

        Same Anonymous as #post-209435. Remembered later, looked and found the AKB article by Canadian Tech last year: Changing Your PCs Battery

        Where it is noted this is simple on a desktop box, and may not be possible on smaller units.

        PaulK had a link to Toshiba above #post-206448 that may give more detail for this notebook.

      • #209496 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi Bill,

        Alrighty! I just watched a YouTube tear-down video for your Toshiba NB505 laptop. Replacing the BIOS battery is pretty straightforward — much easier than on many modern laptops and notebooks. I agree that the battery is the root cause of your sudden issue, instead of being a result of installing any Windows Updates. Here is the YouTube video:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chXYRdQJPrA

        The battery is seen, removed from its slot above where the hard drive would be installed (the guy had already removed the hard drive, at 2:09 in the video. In the video, the guy has laid the battery (black thing with a white sticker on it) on top of the RAM modules.

        Note that earlier in the video, the guy removed and disconnected stuff which clearly is not necessary in order to access and replace the battery, since the the purpose of the guy’s video to show how to perform a full tear-down of a Toshiba NB505 laptop for cleaning and component replacement. The upshot is that only the laptop’s back cover for the RAM and hard drive is all that needs to be removed, in addition to the hard drive, in order to gain easy access to the battery. The relevant parts of the procedure should take a local mom and pop computer shop around 15 minutes to perform.

        Since it is now obvious to me that your passwords in CMOS (BIOS) were lost, the local mom and pop computer shop must have password recovery software which will crack non-complex (as in not too long) passwords for a Windows computer. I have such software since I had to crack the password which was set by a bad employee, and so that I could then perform forensic analysis of the bad employee’s activities while using his office computer.

        I figure that if your CMOS battery is dead, then your laptop’s hard drive most likely is close to death as well, due to age. Thus, the next step for the computer shop is immediately to sector-by-sector clone your laptop’s hard drive to a new hard drive. This is done by using a HD duplicator machine. The shop MUST use tape or other means to absolutely make sure that the original HD and the new HD do not vibrate during the cloning process. This is especially important for an old HD on the brink of failure due to worn out spindle bearings, as they may get only one shot at this. I mention this since, although HD duplicator machines perform their function very well, most HD duplicator machines are cheaply built such that they do not hold the HDs securely enough in order to prevent vibration which could kill a HD which is on the brink of failure.

        The computer shop will then run their software to crack the Admin password which was stored in BIOS, yet which was lost when the CMOS battery died. Yet the computer shop will do so only on the cloned HD and NOT on the original HD which may be near the brink of failure. The Admin password should be easy to crack since, from what I have read online, the Admin passwords which Toshiba creates and stores in BIOS are fairly simple in terms of the number of characters.

        I don’t know if you saw my previous posts. For Toshiba laptops, I have read that there are at least two possibilities for the Admin password which you should try:
        Four spaces, and then hit Enter.

        Nothing at all, and then hit Enter.

        Best regards,
        –Michael

        • #209547 Reply

          Bill
          AskWoody Plus

          I really appreciate the time you’ve taken on this issue.  I have ordered a new cmos battery and a new main battery.

          I feel certain you’re right about a battery problem being the cause of the sudden loss of the clock and therefore the ability to connect to the internet.

          I’ve watched some repair videos on-line.  One showed what in layman’s terms looking like a creating a short circuit to wipe out bios passwords.  But, I figure if I can get the machine running again, I will look for help on that one.  My skills are too low.

          It will be a few days until the cmos battery gets here.  When it does, I will let you know what happens.

          William Sharp

        • #209550 Reply

          Bill
          AskWoody Plus

          I tried using spaces to get the machine to accept it as a password.  It didn’t work on this computer.  Another guy who responded to my plea suggested something similar…one space, two spaces.

          It sure would be great if that worked.

          it did

          William Sharp

    • #209657 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      I really appreciate the time you’ve taken on this issue. I have ordered a new cmos battery and a new main battery. I feel certain you’re right about a battery problem being the cause of the sudden loss of the clock and therefore the ability to connect to the internet. I’ve watched some repair videos on-line. One showed what in layman’s terms looking like a creating a short circuit to wipe out bios passwords. But, I figure if I can get the machine running again, I will look for help on that one. My skills are too low. It will be a few days until the cmos battery gets here. When it does, I will let you know what happens.

      Hi Bill,

      You are most welcome. Don’t do the short circuit thing to wipe out any BIOS passwords. At this point, simply get the new CMOS battery installed. This won’t fix it, yet this is an important step.

      Best regards,

      –GTP

       

    • #210819 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I received and installed a new cmos battery and a new main battery.  I didn’t gain any ground.  I can’t update the clock without an administrator password.  Because the clock is not current, I can’t get to the internet…yadda, yadda.

      Back in the dark ages, I remember typing “format c:” (many times) and started over with the emergency restoration disc.  Now that Toshiba has put the the restoration program in a partitioned section of the c: drive, I think I have to figure out how to get to it.

      If I ever get the machine working, I should be able to reinstall the software I want.

      William Sharp

      • #210862 Reply

        BobbyB
        AskWoody Lounger

        You mention new Battery (main, I take it its a laptop) and a new CMOS battery. To reset CMOS the power Source normally (this includes main battery, Mains power supply and the CMOS Battery normally like a large watch Battery i.e. completely dead) has to be away from the CMOS strip to discharge fully. No you wont wipe it or “Brick” it but it should remove all user settings from the ROM CMOS etc you wont break them they are “Hard Wired” in there. There’s mention of “Short Circuit” that I caught skimming through this UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES TRY as larger Voltage spikes and or Electrostatic charges will fry or “Brick” the Machine. 30Secs is the Golden rule anything over is immaterial but hey it doesent hurt to try, if its a really older machine it may well have a Jumper on the Mother Board or on rare occasions a small reset button, that will do the same Job if its an OS time problem definitely go with @microfix ‘s scenario (below).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #210842 Reply

      Microfix
      Da Boss

      @Bill, Reading all of the above is somewhat confusing so I need to ask:

      1. Do you need a password to change things in the BIOS?

      2. Have you tried pressing F12 upon boot to access the BIOS and change the clock from there and then saving it?

      Win7 Pro x64 | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 | Win7 Pro x86 | W10 never again
      • #210857 Reply

        anonymous

        It’s more than the passwords in bios.

        I downloaded the April rollup update.  When I bought the machine (Toshiba Notebook 505), I chose not to use an administrator password.  It never had one…and may not now.  After installing the download, all user passwords were gone.

        I have tried a bunch of things that should have taken me to a place where I can delete and/or install a password.  None of tips worked.

        I want to save the little device.  It’s a handy size for travel to places where I make PowerPoint presentations.

        My computer skills are low but if I can figure out how to format the hard drive, I think I can reinstall the small number of programs I want on this computer.  It runs WIN 7,  has enough RAM and storage.

        I’m still looking for a way to get this old guy running again.  My other computers are WIN 10 which I don’t like at all.

    • #210968 Reply

      PaulK
      AskWoody Lounger

      1. I gather that you are now at the point that you want to just ‘recover to original factory image’, and abandon all hope of retrieving all user data (except that which is on ‘Bub’).
      Correct?

      2. You said that pressing zero during boot doesn’t work, because ‘administrator is disabled’. This statement is baffling, since Windows hasn’t yet been initiated, and couldn’t possibly be an inhibitor. BUT, if a BIOS Supervisor password has been set, that is a different matter.
      (In 206158 you say: “I have tried to take out the [Windows Administrator] password they installed, but I have to have the password to get into command prompt. When I go to bios, the option to change the administrator password is locked.” Posts 206196, 206328, 206448 clarify that Windows passwords and BIOS passwords are distinct. I may be wrong – and despite several replies above that seem to accepts this – I do not believe that Toshiba stores any Operating System (Windows) password into the BIOS. What is confounding this whole matter is that a Toshiba utility, run from within Windows, supports the changing of BIOS passwords.)

      3. Reference 210819: Technically, the (Toshiba) Restore partition is not within the C: drive. The (only) physical hard drive has multiple partitions: C: drive; the Restore partition; and perhaps one or more partitions. Only the C: drive is visible, the others are normally hidden, but whose allocations can be seen IF one has the (Windows) Administrator password. (Catch-22 anyone?)

      4. 210857: “I chose not to use an administrator password. It never had one … and may not now. After installing the download, all user passwords were gone.”
      – “and may not now” – What? isn’t that what this whole thread is about?
      – “all user passwords were gone” – Umm, no. Bub has no password. ‘Me’ now has a[n unknown] password. It is not clear if ‘my wife’s logon now has a password.

      5. I don’t see a succinct reply to Microfix‘s questions.
      Please post the exact verbiage that is displayed when you do a Boot while holding the 0 (zero) key.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #211161 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        My current situation:

        I am asked for a password as the machine powers on.

        I have that so it goes to a screen showing names and icons of users.

        If I click on my daughter’s icon, the program goes to her desktop screen without asking for a password.  The others all require a password…that I don’t know, can’t guess.

        I have followed the trail using lusrmgr.msc.  The list of users are: administrators, Bub (daughter), Mary (wife), Bill Sharp, guest, homeusers.  Under the “member of” tab, administrators, Mary, and Bill are all members of administrators.  Bub is not a member of the administrators group.  I have tried to add her (as well as me and my wife).  I get a requests for a password.  Administrators is disabled.

        Recently the clock went back to the first day the machine was used.  After that, I was denied access to the Internet because the clock was not correct (error message).  All attempts to add, delete or changes any programs get an error message “access is denied.” I bought and installed new cmos and main batteries.

        I have tried all the things suggested.,.particularly 206249, 206307, 206295, 206328, 206354, 206479, 206851, 207041 and 210968.

        When I try holding down the 0 key during start up, nothing happens…no messages.

        I just want to kill or replace the password.

        William Sharp

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #211194 Reply

          Microfix
          Da Boss

          Have you tried my previous request yet?
          1st things 1st, we need to get the system time correct before going any further as this may/ or may not cause complications later.

          Win7 Pro x64 | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 | Win7 Pro x86 | W10 never again
    • #210999 Reply

      Elly
      AskWoody MVP

      Please post the exact verbiage that is displayed when you do a Boot while holding the 0 (zero) key.

      Please?

      Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #211178 Reply

      geekdom
      AskWoody Plus

      I offer this modest suggestion again:

      WIN 7 administrator password

      G{ot backup} TestBeta
      offline▸Win7Pro • SP1 • x64 • InUse
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    • #211192 Reply

      BobbyB
      AskWoody Lounger

      @bill fairly hesitant to suggest these solutions as they are a bit drastic but here goes anyways on the account you can access you could always try “Take Ownership” via a Reg key, this may well scre mess up your file permissions for each account on your machine but at least you may be able to get Data out and save if the worst case scenario occurs.
      https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/add-take-ownership-to-explorer-right-click-menu-in-vista/ (there’s lots of ready made Downloadable keys out there just check with AV before use)
      Right click on the user folder and select “Take Ownership” should appear in the menu, it wont open up the folder for password access again but at least you should be able to get stuff out that you may need, You previously posted https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/win-7-administrator-password/#post-206311 in which you said you don’t want to “wipe” and fresh install so go to C:\windows\system32\sysprep inside you’ll find “Sysprep” run as admin, when it opens under “system cleanup action” select “Enter system Audit Mode” and reboot, you will be logged in with a defacto admin account delete all the user accounts then reboot. It will be like setting up a new computer again only it wont, anything that resides on the C:\ drive Office any Programmes installed all your updates drivers etc everything will still be there. BUT anything tied or residing in a user account will be gone, Docs Favourites Pictures hence you need the Golden rule Back up, Back up, back up. Your first account naturally, from setup will be as Admin then re-add your accounts as before. Note these suggestions are the absolute last step before reinstall if your not getting any where with access to the user accounts not to be taken lightly, fingers crossed here.

      • #211220 Reply

        PaulK
        AskWoody Lounger

        ” … inside you’ll find “Sysprep” run as admin …”
        Bobby: How does he run as admin when he doesn’t have the administrator password? What am I missing?

        • #211236 Reply

          BobbyB
          AskWoody Lounger

          hey its worth a try I havent run in to a system like that before where you cant get in to the accounts, there’s always a way otherwise its a wipe and I guess it’ll either kick him out and no harm done or it’ll work but they are last resort scenario’s If you have time and patience and resources you can probably find a way, not really got much of that at work. So with crashed systems I normally retrieve the all important Test Data wipe and reinstall. Many times when folks return the Machines from the field there’s all sorts of “Tinkering” and unauthorised Downloading gone on. Its quicker than messing with a reluctant machine. Still musing here whether it was a 3rd party App that scrambled all the permissions. As I have no idea where you all are it maybe impractical to do House calls lol 😉 as so often solutions present themselves if you have “Hands On” Often in describing faults the most trivial or seemingly unimportant detail could be the issue at hand.

    • #211653 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks guys for all your time and attempts to get my machine going.  I’m throwing in the towel…and will now try to restore it.

      On-line, I found a little company in South Carolina that sells recovery discs.  If any of you have opinions on what I should order, I will appreciate your thoughts.

      https://www.ebay.com/str/Appletree-Software-Sales/Windows-7-Password-Recovery-/_i.html?_storecat=5066896011

      Thanks to all of you, again.

      Bill

      William Sharp

    • #211714 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      You do NOT need to buy a password recovery disk.

      There are good free ones listed in this thread.

      WIN 7 administrator password

      WIN 7 administrator password

      cheers, Paul

    • #1874187 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I’m back…again after 15 months of trying EVERYTHING.  The subject is the same.  I am blocked from downloading, moving or deleting any files without an administrator password.  I never had a password but the windows update I downloaded in April 2018 changed that.

      I bought the machine on-line from its original owner.  I used it for about 5 years.  Was never asked for a password.

      I want to find a way to wipe the hard drive.  Can’t figure out how to do that without a password.  Any ideas?

      William Sharp

    • #1874190 Reply

      Berton
      AskWoody_MVP

      I  use 2 methods in such a situation, one is a relatively expensive Technicians program on a bootable CD that allow deleting passwords and the other is either a Bootable Linux DVD that has GPARTED or a Bootable GPARTED CD, both created from a downloaded .iso file to create the disc.  GPARTED is great for deleting partitions on a drive, gives a clean media for installing an OS.  The main issue is to have the install media available first, either an earlier version of Windows [Win7, 8 or 8.1] or using the MCT/Media Creation Tool to either create a Bootable USB drive or download an .iso file to create the Bootable install DVD.  Be sure to get the same edition as in use, x86 or x64.  After having created the install media the computer should complain about not finding an OS so insert one or the other and try again.

      Should have mentioned, your problem can’t be resolved from the installed Windows which is the reason for other measures, the OS booted to can’t kill itself.

      Before you wonder "Am I doing things right," ask "Am I doing the right things?"
      • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by  Berton.
    • #1874216 Reply

      The Surfing Pensioner
      AskWoody Plus

      Have you never felt like…………………………………………..?

       

      computer-duck-smash

      Attachments:
      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1874228 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Some thoughts that probably have also occurred to Bill: If it came to extreme solutions, after all one’s own efforts have failed, instead of taking an ax to it, as helpfully suggested by dear TSF wih her cartoon, I much rather (as was recommended already here much earlier on) find myself a good computer repair shop with expert technicians that can fix both hardware and software problems to take the ailing machine there, after finding the place through some previous research, including asking for recommendations from people who work in computers themselves, etc. And if that fails or is not practical (e.g., if one lives in a small town far from any large city), then I’ll seriously consider buying a new computer (or perhaps an old new computer: sometimes refurbished machines can be a good buy, I understand) and will start researching that possibility as well. But, in such a case, I’ll remove the hard disk, to keep its data from falling in the wrong hands, backing up its contents first, if that is still possible (there are other ways to get that done if the old PC can’t do it anymore, although some may cost money), and then recycle the old computer.

      Bill: once, many years ago, my first PC, running Windows 98, would no longer boot up. Someone recommended to me a nice lady that worked on it and, after a couple of days gave it back to me once more in good working order. Thanks to her, I could keep on using it for another year. By then it was seriously running of space in the hard disk no matter what I did and also was no longer capable of coping with the new developments on the Internet, particularly the then novelty of streaming TV programs and movies. But other things were not working too well also: the machine had become too slow to keep up with the world, or the world to fast for it. Then I bought my next PC, running Windows XP.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

    • #1874252 Reply

      PaulK
      AskWoody Lounger

      These may have been listed somewhere above, but what is the hardware configuration:
      – What is the hard disk capacity? Or at least C: size? Can you list other partitions sizes?
      – What I/O ports or drives are there: optical, USB, diskette, other?
      – Does one also need a password in order to:
      – – – get into the BIOS?
      – – – change BIOS settings?
      – – If no and no, does the BIOS support the capability to boot over a network?

      With this information someone may be able to suggest a workaround – external boot, and format.

      • #1874499 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        In the past 15 months I have tried everything you guys have suggested.  I have even purchased software that is designed to wipe existing passwords.

        The stopper is always the same.  I can’t add, change or delete any file without the magical “administrator password.”  I have loved my WIN 7 system for years.  I wanted badly to have one machine with a program I like.

        Now, I am willing to step into the quick sand.  I have WIN 10 on other machines.  I dislike like it, but I can get things done.

        25 years ago Woody sold me one of his old machines that had WIN 3.1 on it. Since then, I have gone through WIN 95 and several others.

        I’m 75 and tired.  I’m ready to wipe my old buddie and install WIN 10.  I just can’t figure out how to do it when I can’t get past the “administrator password” roadblock.

        My little old machine has USB ports but no disc drive.  I can access BIOS but can’t change the administrator password.  I can create a sign on password but am denied administrator changes.

        William Sharp

        • #1874601 Reply

          jabeattyauditor
          AskWoody Lounger

          Bill, where do you live? (City, State, Country)

          This is at most a 30-minute task (assuming you have a glacially-slow computer) with the right tools. SOMEBODY has to live close enough to drop by and help you out.

          If you happen to be near me (SW Ohio), I’ll do it.

          • #1874613 Reply

            Bill
            AskWoody Plus

            I live on a tiny farm very near Kansas City Missouri.  I have the only Internet service available here…Hughes Satellite.  The machine I’m trying to get going again is a Toshiba Note Book 505.  I have a laptop and desktop that are both on WIN 10 that are not affected by this problem that came with a Windows update in April 2018.  Because I can’t add, move or delete files, I can’t remove the update.

            William Sharp

    • #1874258 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Back in the days the Utilman + cmd trick worked :

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xuQWGvcVFc

      • #1874441 Reply

        b
        AskWoody Plus

        I thought that still worked on Windows 7 (but not on Windows 10 which is more secure).

        A similar suggestion was made a year ago but was ignored, at post #206310 above.

        Windows 10 Pro Version 2004: Group ASAP (chump/pioneer)

        • #1874595 Reply

          Bill

          Looks like it should work.  Wish this guy lived next door or nearby.  I’m 75 and have difficulty remembering that many steps.  Perhaps if I could find his actions as a printed list, I could work down through them.

          Thanks for getting me to this.

    • #1874657 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Looks like it should work.  Wish this guy lived next door or nearby.  I’m 75 and have difficulty remembering that many steps.  Perhaps if I could find his actions as a printed list, I could work down through them.

      Thanks for getting me to this.

      Try by downloading the YouTube video with Closed captions to a smartphone/Tablet/PC and play the video in slow-motion for easier follow up.

    • #1874888 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Bill, have you tried the offline recovery CD in this link?
      http://pogostick.net/~pnh/ntpasswd/bootdisk.html

      It’s an 18MB download that you burn to a CD and then use to boot and reset the password.

      cheers, Paul

      • #1876610 Reply

        PaulK
        AskWoody Lounger

        Bummer. In 1874499: “My little old machine has USB ports but no disc drive.”

        BUT: The first line of the Pogostick link is:
        “I’ve put together a CD or USB Drive image which contains things needed to reset the passwords on most systems.” [emphasis added]

        So, Bill: In the BIOS, can you change it to boot from USB?
        Also, have you tried the suggestion in 206479?

    • #1877165 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      This is an old thread. I recall that Bill has a Toshiba laptop? I vaguely recall that Toshiba has something in the laptop’s BIOS which somehow sets or controls the password for the disabled Windows administrator account? I have a strong feeling that only a Toshiba repair center can fix Bill’s issue, since this is a Toshiba thing. If Bill gets this issue fixed by Toshiba, then we should teach Bill how to create an additional and separate administrator account which has a really strong password (at least 14 characters and which uses special characters) which can not be cracked by malware due to entropy.

      Bill’s mess actually is Toshiba’s mess. Toshiba should step to the plate and help Bill.

    • #1877173 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      The machine operated very well for years…until April 18, 2018 when I downloaded a microsoft rollup update.  If I can wipe the requirement for an administrator password from the system, I would go back to what I had before…no password.  This machine in very small and is used for projection of ppt files and movies on DVD  especially when I travel.  I don’t use it for anything anyone would consider important and I don’t store any important files on it.  I write many doc files, but I do it on other computers that have better software an more memory.

      William Sharp

    • #1904687 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Paul, I have been away for a few weeks, but I did try to use the Pogostick program.  I download it, unzipped it, got into BIOS and set the system to boot from my USB disc where the Pogostick program is.

      I think because I can only sign on as a user, the changes didn’t “take.”  I’m still stuck with the machine asking for an administrator password.

      Thanks for trying to help me.

      William Sharp

      • #1926024 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi Bill,

        I came across this video this morning for clearing the passwords in a Toshiba NB505’s BIOS. Others should review the video so that they can chime in as to whether or not this might resolve your issue. See:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P516wdYnlYI

        Best regards,

        –GTP

      • #1926051 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        I also found a program called iSumsoft Windows Password Refixer. See:

        https://www.isumsoft.com/windows-7-password-refixer/

        See this YouTube video about how to use the software:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jM2ghRmUNac

        The software appears to add an administrator account named iSumsoft. Then the user is supposed to set this account’s password to blank, and then reboot the computer. At that point, the user should then be able to set new passwords for the other accounts on the computer.

        I do not know whether or not the above software contains any malware.

        • This reply was modified 6 months ago by  GoneToPlaid. Reason: add video link
        • #1941283 Reply

          Bill
          AskWoody Plus

          I have pics of the under side of the computer but can’t figure out how to attach them here.

          If you will send an email to (email address removed for security reasons) I’ll send them.

          William Sharp

          • #1941285 Reply

            geekdom
            AskWoody Plus

            Go to the bottom of reply while logged in and include your picture.

            attach

            Remove your mail address; it’s unwise.

            G{ot backup} TestBeta
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            • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by  geekdom.
            • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by  geekdom.
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    • #1905752 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      If you got into the BIOS and were able to change the boot device then it should work – unless you need the admin password to save the BIOS changes.
      It seems more likely the USB device isn’t recognised as a boot device and that may be in the boot settings. Can you post details of the boot settings?

      cheers, Paul

    • #2014321 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I’m back with one last question. I don’t have administrator authorization. The software requires a password to do anything.  I can’t use BIOS to change the source from which I boot…can’t add or delete and programs.  I can sign on to one user account and use the machine for loaded programs.

      We have tried everything to find and/or change the administrator password, but nothing worked because I can’t import or export files.

      Is there a way to just wipe the hard drive?  I read somewhere on line that running a strong magnet across the bottom of the machine will wipe it clean.  I suspect it will also wreck the computer.

      William Sharp

      • #2014503 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        Is there a way to just wipe the hard drive?  I read somewhere on line that running a strong magnet across the bottom of the machine will wipe it clean.  I suspect it will also wreck the computer.

        Can’t rely on that working on anything made after about 2000. And if it does, yes, it most likely will wreck the computer.

        At this point I’d say the best method to get this solved is to get local help. As in a trained (or at least well self-taught) technician with a screwdriver, and a second computer with a free drive connector (or a USB bridge for one). Physically remove the hard drive and attach it to the second computer, use the second computer to change things, then put the drive back…

        Though, wiping the drive that way might also lead to you not getting much use out of it, if it still won’t boot from other devices.

        And as this has been going on since mid-2018 … surely you could visit a town with a PC technician at least once per year, if you can’t get one to come to you?

    • #2014521 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      I don’t believe you can’t change the boot order in the BIOS. That is a standard feature of every PC I’ve ever used.

      Are you able to get into the BIOS? (Press F2 a lot as soon as you turn it on)
      This page has some blurb on BIOS passwords.

      cheers, Paul

      • #2014527 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        I don’t believe you can’t change the boot order in the BIOS. That is a standard feature of every PC I’ve ever used.

        I’ve run into about 3 models from 2 different brands where this feature didn’t exist, and dozens of models where it could be locked behind a password.

    • #2014731 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I can get into BIOS… but as a user.  I have changed to startup instruction but it doesn’t seem to “stick”…probably because I am not signing in as administrator.

      William Sharp

    • #2014742 Reply

      Microfix
      Da Boss

      TL:DR
      my question is here regarding the BIOS/CMOS settings not saving..
      If the CR2023 (or whatever battery) that supplies a charge for the BIOS/CMOS settings were to be removed for 15mins whilst disconnected from the power socket, wouldn’t this just force a bios default and have no admin password whatsoever?
      This would enable you to change settings within the BIOS and they would (should) stick when saved.
      IIRC I’ve done this years ago on older tech resulting in reconfiguring the BIOS setup to achieve a full system boot. Couldn’t be that straight forward, could it?

      2nd part in windows is still open for suggestions (no CD/DVDROM) USB ports ony.

      Win7 Pro x64 | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 | Win7 Pro x86 | W10 never again
    • #2014920 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      I can get into BIOS… but as a user

      BIOS access doesn’t usually have users / admins. What can happen is you can’t change anything without entering the admin password.
      Is that what you are seeing?

      cheers, Paul

      • #2014928 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        BIOS access doesn’t usually have users / admins.

        Usually, but counterexamples exist.

        Particularly extreme (and rare, especially outside tightly managed corporate networks) counterexamples would include those where the BIOS itself is integrated with Windows domain login and groups.

        Those can be a bother when one of those is forgotten on a shelf while the network is updated, and then later someone remembers it and tries to use it… so, the old domain controller is no longer around, and this thing doesn’t support the new authentication scheme?

        Was a “fun” day, that.

    • #2016080 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks guys.  I will try again.

      I don’t use admin passwords on my other machines.  Never had one on this one until installing the Apr 2018 rollup.

      I have other machines that are all WIN 10 driven.  I hate to give up my old WIN 7 buddy.  After struggling through WIN 3.1, 95, 97. XP and Vista, WIN 7 was a breath of fresh air.

      William Sharp

      • #2016487 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi Bill,

        In BIOS, try typing in “Toshiba” without quotes for the BIOS administrator password. Note that this is case sensitive with a capital T and the other letters in lower case. If this doesn’t work, then try the methods shown in this YouTube video:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hb0fGxT9VYU

        If the above doesn’t work, then Bill is going to have to short the U contact on jumper J1.

        Bill emailed me photos of his laptop back in September. Please see the attached photos. Bill’s laptop is a Toshiba NB505-N508BL. The User’s Guide for Bill’s laptop is here:

        https://support.dynabook.com/support/modelHome?freeText=3043211&osId=3333616

        Chapter 5 in the User’s Guide contains information about the password features in the BIOS.

        The BIOS has a feature to store a Windows password such that the user never needs to type in a password when booting Windows. Like other BIOSes, the BIOS also supports setting both user and administrator passwords for the BIOS itself.

        Bill does not know the administrator password for the BIOS. If he knew that, then he would have access to the BIOS setting for either setting a new Windows password in the BIOS, or for completely disabling this BIOS feature. If Toshiba is not the administrator password for the administrator level settings in the BIOS, then Bill is going to have to ground the U shaped contact on jumper J1 by following the procedure in the YouTube video which is linked further below.

        Toshiba realized that it is possible for a user to become locked out of the administrator sections of the BIOS. So Toshiba provided a jumber pad, labeled as J1, for clearing all passwords in the BIOS. All that is needed is a thin strand of copper wire. Bill can get a thin strand of copper wire by cutting a cheap dollar store electrical extension cord and using needle nose pliers to extract a single strand of copper wire.

        The procedure for shorting the U shaped contact on jumper J1 is shown in this YouTube video:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P516wdYnlYI

        Best regards,

        –GTP

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        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2021443 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for staying with me, GoneToPlaid.  I went into BIOS and typed Toshiba in the appropriate spot.  Then I opened Windows and tried to delete one shortcut from my desktop.  Didn’t work.

      I will watch the YouTube piece again.

      William Sharp

    • #2021513 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      GTP’s Post #2016487
      “Toshiba realized that it is possible for a user to become locked out of the administrator sections of the BIOS. So Toshiba provided a jumber pad, labeled as J1, for clearing all passwords in the BIOS. All that is needed is a thin strand of copper wire. Bill can get a thin strand of copper wire by cutting a cheap dollar store electrical extension cord and using needle nose pliers to extract a single strand of copper wire. The procedure for shorting the U shaped contact on jumper J1 is shown in this YouTube video:”

      @Bill, please try that.

      BTW, have you attempted to contact a qualified technician yet?

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2087600 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      One more time.

      Because I must have an administrator password (which I don’t have) to add, delete or modify anything on my old WIN 7 machine, and the operating system will die soon, I would like to format the hard drive and install WIN 10.

      Does anyone know how to format a hard drive without an administrator password?

      William Sharp

      • #2111790 Reply

        anonymous

        forums.tomshardware.com/threads/password-locked-hard-drive-reformat.1293451/h

        The Hard Drive sounds locked.  So time for DBAN. Make a boot usb or Dvd with DBAN and boot to it. dban.org. That will reformat it. but all data will be gone!

    • #2087621 Reply

      DaveA
      AskWoody_MVP

      Have you tried getting to the safe mode and using the Administrator account?

      Unless you set up an password for the Administrator account all you need to do is hit the enter key when in the Password field. Then you should be able to change your account to the Amin group and/or do the install of 10 using this account.

      DaveA I am so far behind, I think I am First
      Genealogy....confusing the dead and annoying the living

    • #2087640 Reply

      anonymous

      If you are really lucky, you only have a Windows password set, and not a bios one.  If that were true, it would be easy to set the bios to boot from an install media and boot from a windows 10 install media.  If you unpartition and format during install, there is more risk you will lose your free upgrade to windows 10.  See other tutorials on how to get the upgrade free.  If you have a 7 key sticker, you are probably fine.  If you do not, normally you want to do an upgrade first before doing any clean install.

      But this thread should not have gone on so long if the problem were that simple.  If the only problem was a windows password there should have been many relatively easy fixes, booting from “password restore” disks or doing a clean windows 7 install.  Most of the above seem to think you have a bios password or hard drive encryption password.

      Create a bootable Windows 10 install media (either flash drive or DVD) using another computer.  Search for a Media creation tool tutorial.  Try to boot from it.  I assume this will not work, that having it inserted after a cold shutdown and pressing f12 or similar to boot from DVD, or changing boot order in the bios to allow USB or DVD boot will be inaccessible and will ask for a bios password.  But, it is worth a try.  If it did boot, you might be able to unpartition and reformat during the install process.  Again, a bios hard drive password or a hard drives own encryption password could block you at this stage, and formatting may lose your free upgrade to 10 license.   If those password prompts do occur even when successfully booting from the install media, then you are in real trouble.  Depending on your access to spare parts, trying the install media after replacing the computers hard drive with a spare blank one could lead to success if the problem is a hard drive encryption password.  Otherwise, the only way would be resetting the bios passwords.

      As you likely know by now, resetting the bios password often requires disassembly of the machine and most repair shops will charge more to do (or worse some will charge you even if it fails) this than the machine may be worth.  Used prices for old laptops you can verify are quite low.

    • #2087991 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      You have a Toshiba NB505 with WIN 7 Pro.

      The intent is to find out how you can get back into Windows 7 in order to upgrade to Windows 10 for free.
      — Do you know the 25-character product key for your Windows 7 Pro?
      Is you Powerpoint a stand alone or is part of a Microsoft Office program?
      — Either way, you will probably need to know the 25-character product key also when you upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

      Bill’s post #206986
      “I can boot to WIN 7. I can’t add or delete any programs that require administrator approval.
      I have 6 user accounts: Administrator, Bub (my daughter), Guest, Mary (my wife), Home Group, and Toshita NB500.
      I now sign on using Bub… because it’s the only one that doesn’t ask for administrator permission. I always can sign on.
      — When you sign into Bub, are you sing a password?
      The administrator and Toshiba accounts are both part of the administrator group. The others aren’t.
      The administrator account has two blocks checked…”password never expires” and “account is denied.” When I uncheck the “account is denied and then click “apply” I get the screen that says “access is denied.”
      I can’t find a way to create or change the administrator password.”
      — Please verify, is that the administrator account you ar trying to log in to?
      — I’m hoping that is the only issue as it opens the door to use the hidden Administrator account.

      Toshiba NB500/NB505/NB520/NB525 NB550D/NB555D Series
      http://web1.toshiba.ca/support/isg/manuals/pll5fc/NB500_NB520_NB525_NB550D_NB555D_EnglishManual.pdf
      According to this users manual there is a Password Utility beginning on page 77/137: actual page 4-9.

      The password utility allows you to maintain an additional level of security and provides two levels of password security: Users and Supervisor.

      Passwords set in Toshiba Supervisor Password Utility are different from the Windows login password which we all know.
      — Note that description doesn’t include the User account.
      — It appears to me that you do not have an issue getting into your BIOS: is that true?
      Please verify,
      — is there a password assigned to Supervisor?
      — is there a password assigned to Users?
      — If Users is assigned a password, that’s probably the gateway for you to log-in to you administrator account.
      Those might be repetitive questions but I’m having a hard time discerning that.

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2088262 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I can log on to WIN 7 as a user.  I can get into BIOS as a user.  Any attempt to get into anything as administrator requires a password.

      I don’t use any passwords to log on to WIN 7.  I never had a password for administrator.  When I downloaded a bill rollup in April 2018, I suddenly was being asked for a password.

      Lots of folks on Ask Woody have suggested lot of things to discover the password and then open the administrator account.  It has been nearly two years trying just about everything… none worked.

      I don’t know the the product code for my WIN 7 pro.  I previously had a lower version and download an upgrade.

      I have another old machine that I converted from WIN 7 to WIN 10 and later upgraded that program by download.

      I would like to give the two machines to grandsons.  I just have to get my little one running especially now that Microsoft is winding down support for WIN 7.  Seems like there should be a way to format my old little computer and install WIN 10 onto a clean drive

      William Sharp

    • #2088329 Reply

      mledman
      AskWoody Plus

      Bill,

      If you format the drive and don’t have the activation key for windows 7, you would need to buy a windows 10 activation key.  Image the drive before the format in case everything goes belly up.

      This How-to Geek page

      https://www.howtogeek.com/206329/how-to-find-your-lost-windows-or-office-product-keys/

      has ways to discover the activation key for windows 7.  Three quarters down the page “Find the Windows Key Without Any Software (Advanced Users Only)” uses a VBscript to read the key in plain text from the registry.  If this gives you the 25 character key without “OEM” in it, the key should activate a clean install of windows 10.

      Win 10 home - 1909
      Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2110278 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      What I posted yesterday must not have attached.

      I found an product key.  It appears to be for the original software installed by Toshiba.  The machine was upgraded to WIN 7 Pro but I don’t see any stickers for that.  Since I must have an administrator password (that I don’t have) I’m wondering of I can format and install WIN 10.

      William Sharp

    • #2110287 Reply

      anonymous

      If you can run key finder software which would often need a windows admin password to run, and get your windows 7 key, great.  If you can’t, do what mledman said above with vbscript, that should give a windows 7 key, but pay attention to what was said about the signs that it is in the right format.

      If you find your windows 7 key, and you can boot from windows 10 install media, then you can format and install and it should accept your key.  If possible, do a full image backup first to a backup drive.  If you are comfortable with it, it may be lower risk to remove the hard drive and install a blank hard drive, then boot windows 10 install media and use your 7 key to install.

      If you are not sure that you have found a windows 7 key, or you know you have not, then it would be wise to bring the computer to a professional, and tell them that you are hoping they will find your windows 7 key and use that to install windows 10 on that computer.  They can remove your hard drive if necessary, or boot from Linux or proprietary tools, to find your key.  And as they attempt to install windows 10 they will quickly learn if there is a bios password that could make the job impossible, or if there are only windows administrator passwords that can be bypassed by formatting (or other tricks that they may know).

      If you lose your windows 7 install and its key, that would be bad.  Buying Windows 10 home from Microsoft costs $140, almost as much as the lowest end new laptops.  If at all possible, find ways to get your key and to backup your current installation.

    • #2110331 Reply

      anonymous

      Did you get a windows 7 key by using the “Find the Windows Key Without Any Software (Advanced Users Only)”  VBscript?  Is it in the format mledman said, 25 characters without an OEM?

      If you don’t for sure know you have your windows 7 key, buying a windows 10 license can be very expensive.  We need to make sure you got one before you continue.  Some of this would be easiest if you can get a computer expert to help you in real time, either over the telephone or by chat (using a second computer, not the one that needs to be fixed).  Perhaps there is a local computer group or help center that could help coordinate that?

      Another step that could be helpful that you can do while you are waiting is to create a bootable windows 10 install media.  This is easiest to do with a 8gb or larger USB flash drive, although burning a DVD may also be possible.  Don’t actually use it yet without further confirmation, but if you can work on the download and create bootable steps it could be useful later.

    • #2110385 Reply

      mledman
      AskWoody Plus

      I found an product key. It appears to be for the original software installed by Toshiba.

      What was the original software?  Does this product key have “OEM” in it?

      Win 10 home - 1909
      Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  mledman.
    • #2111257 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      The label says it is Home Premium…OEM.

      As I said, it was upgraded and the software is now WIN 7 Pro

      William Sharp

    • #2111317 Reply

      mledman
      AskWoody Plus

      I do not believe an OEM windows 7 key will activate windows 10 installed on a formatted hard drive.  If the VBscript produces a different key it most likely is the windows 7 pro key.  If that key does not have OEM in it, it should activate windows 10 installed on a formatted hard drive.

      You could try an in place upgrade to windows 10 and choose not to keep your files and settings.  This might install a fresh, activated windows 10 pro without the password problem.  Or it could fail miserably.  Whatever you try, please image the windows 7 installation!  You will need a way back if things don’t go well.

      Win 10 home - 1909
      Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

    • #2111770 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I can’t format the disc without administrator priviledges which means I have to have an administrator password.

      The macine came with a starter version of WIN 7. It was upgraded to home premium and then to Pro.  I don’t have the product key for the Pro version.

      Can the hard drive be wiped in a way other than command prompt?  There are no files on it that I need to save.

      William Sharp

      • #2111779 Reply

        mledman
        AskWoody Plus

        You can’t format the the drive from the command prompt because the operating system is running on the drive your trying to format.  This Lifewire page

        https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-format-c-drive-2626123

        has options to format the primary drive.  Once you format the drive, The windows key is gone (unless you have an image).  I would try the free windows 10 upgrade and see what happens.

        Win 10 home - 1909
        Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

      • #2111780 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        You can wipe the drive from a boot CD/DVD/USB drive or you can pull the drive and hook it up to another computer with an adapter. Trying to format an a drive from within an active session would leave you ….where?

    • #2124279 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      Bill consider connecting your HDD externally on another PC in order to wipe it clean.

      Unfortunately though I don’t have much confidence you will be will be able to upgrade to or clean install Win 10 Pro in your Toshiba NB505 with Win 7 Pro for free unless you know its 25-character product key.
      — AFAIK, an Administrator’s account or it’s password if using a non-administrator account is needed to run a program to identify your 25-character product key.

      I use ShowKeyPlus when I need to know an OS product key.
      https://github.com/Superfly-Inc/ShowKeyPlus/releases/tag/ShowkeyPlus
      For verification, I just tested it from a non-administrator account and the password for my local administrator account was requested.

      In addition, the way your Toshiba BIOS controls your passwords is not good at all. Unless those passwords can be determined etc. I suspect it will not be possible to upgrade to or clean install Win 10 Pro in your Toshiba NB505 normally.
      — If I remember correctly, you cannot correct the date/time in your BIOS w/o administrative permission: is that the case?

      However I would be open to the following attempt with the following caveat: your Toshiba BIOS is set in stone and I don’t see a way around it w/o being able to clear, adjust or set it back to default.
      — But I’ve never seen a situation like yours, however I would attempt trying the clean install completely off line.
      — I believe it won’t take long for the BIOS to block that possibility if what I believe the BIOS most likely will do but I would verify it if it were my PC.

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2124295 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      cmptrgy, You’ve talking above my skill level.

      I have a product key (25 characters) for the original install.

      I bought the machine on-line.  It had been refurbed and there is a sticker on the bottom with a 14 character number.

      I upgraded on-line to WIN 7 Pro SP1.  In device manager, I have a product ID that is 20 characters.

      All software I have tried in the past two years immediately asked for an administrator password.

      If I go into BIOS and attempt to change how the machine starts up, I don’t get any error message…it just doesn’t accept starting from a USB drive or CD.

      I have no idea why the Microsoft rollup I installed added a demand for an administrator password.  I never had one before.  I am denied access or uninstall the rollup.

      I’m the one who settled on the conclusion my only choices are to find the password or find a way to format the hard drive.

      I have loved WIN7 but now know that I must move on the WIN10…if I can ever figure out how.

      William Sharp

    • #2124300 Reply

      anonymous

      Is there no data, other than the key, that you need from that computer?  Can you find online a service manual for your computer, to see how difficult it is to remove the hard drive?  Compare prices for used hard drives that are compatible with your computer.  Your drive, I believe, contains a Windows 7 key that you may not now be able to find.  But, that key could be accessed from another computer, if you don’t format the drive.  You should be able to buy a used drive for $30 or less.  This would allow you to install that instead and keep the old drive for later recovery of the key.

      With a blank drive installed, I think the bios password will cause a Windows install to fail, but you may get lucky and it could work.  You can try to install Windows 10 as unlicensed (just click skip when it asks for a key) to verify that the computer is fully functional.

    • #2124310 Reply

      jabeattyauditor
      AskWoody Lounger

      Given these two facts:

      1. You can’t boot from USB because there’s a BIOS password set that keeps you from changing the boot order…
      2. You can’t do an upgrade-in-place to Windows 10 because you don’t have access to an admin-level account

      I can think of one way you can improve your situation without buying additional hardware or software, but you’ll need access to another computer and possibly a USB dock to accomplish it.

      1. Remove the hard drive from your laptop
      2. Using a USB dock, connect your hard drive to another PC or laptop that CAN be booted from USB or CD-Rom
      3. Boot that PC or laptop using one of the freely-available password-cracking utilities, then use that utility to reset/remove the password(s) of the admin accounts on your original laptop’s hard drive
      4. Power everything down, reinstall the hard drive in your original laptop, then boot it up and login using one of the newly-reset admin accounts.
      5. Make whatever OS choice you want as long as it can be downloaded and installed from a running Windows 7 session – you may be limited to Windows 10, but some Linux distributions may install in a similar fashion.

      You won’t have defeated your BIOS password using this approach, so you’ll still be prevented from booting from another drive or device, but you should be able to get your system updated and have admin-level access going forward.

      Again, you’ll need access to another system, some utility software, and a USB dock.

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by  jabeattyauditor. Reason: Grammar
    • #2124339 Reply

      Bill

      The help you guys are offering is deeply appreciated…but way above my skill level.

      Is there a way to find someone in the Kansas City, MO area who is recommended by an Ask Woody member?

      I’m 76.  My hope was to give the machine to one of my grandkids.  I doubt I can figure out how to do the recommended steps.  By the same token, there isn’t much point in investing more than this old machine is worth to get it back to “normal.”

    • #2124348 Reply

      anonymous

      Can you press f12 or some other key, during power on, with a bootable usb flash drive or bootable dvd inserted to get it to boot to that dvd or flash drive?  Most Linux DVDs would be an example of a bootable DVD, as would usually the disks that came with a computer, like a Windows Vista install disk.

    • #2124466 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      Hi Bill in your post #2124295
      “If I go into BIOS and attempt to change how the machine starts up, I don’t get any error message…it just doesn’t accept starting from a USB drive or CD.
      I have no idea why the Microsoft rollup I installed added a demand for an administrator password. I never had one before. I am denied access or uninstall the rollup.”

      I understand what you are saying as well as not understanding the effect of the WU rollup for your administrator password as I feel the same way.
      I believe that it isn’t possible to change your administrator password at the log-in time or some placement within your system is because it’s the BIOS that controls that and that’s where those passwords need to be dealt with.

      Well another thought came to my mind
      In your post #206407
      “I go to a page that has options like “password never expires” and “account is disabled.”
      — I know I’m speculating here but go into your BIOS and see if you can enable your account in there.

      In my post #2087991
      “Toshiba NB500/NB505/NB520/NB525 NB550D/NB555D Series
      http://web1.toshiba.ca/support/isg/manuals/pll5fc/NB500_NB520_NB525_NB550D_NB555D_EnglishManual.pdf
      According to this users manual there is a Password Utility beginning on page 77/137: actual page 4-9.
      The password utility allows you to maintain an additional level of security and provides two levels of password security: Users and Supervisor.”
      — Unfortunately though there isn’t any help when a problem comes into the picture and I haven’t been able to find a troubleshooting manual.
      If you haven’t done so, go to Toshiba help community ask if there is way to reset the BIOS back to default in a situation like yours.

      There have been recommendations to address your administrator password which should have worked, but they are not designed to deal with the source of the passwords stemming from the BIOS that I know of.

      Your post #2124295 “I have a product key (25 characters) for the original install.”
      — What OS is it for? Do you have an install CD for that original OS?

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2134913 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I opened the link to the Toshiba users manual. The section on passwords offers for changing user or supervisor password which I tried and have before.  The have no effect on administrator password.

      I have tried clicking the F2 and F12 keys but they lead to bios and the same options as the Toshiba manual.

      Can the product ID that appears in device manager be used for anything?  Seems like there should be something that opens the file where the administrator ID is so that I can delete it or change to something I can remember and use.

      William Sharp

    • #2134955 Reply

      anonymous

      Pressing enter at the password prompt to enter bios as admin does not work, right?

    • #2135004 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      Bill Post #206239
      “My problem began shortly after I downloaded the monthly roll up in April (2018).”

      I just did the following using my non-admin account and wasn’t requested to use an Administrator account/password.

      Go to Windows lifecycle fact sheet
      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/13853/windows-lifecycle-fact-sheet
      Scroll down to “By Windows 10 version, below are the availability and end of service dates segmented by edition.”
      For April 2018 you will see
      Windows 10, version 1803 date of availability was April 30, 2018.
      — End of service for Home, Pro, Pro Education, and Pro for Workstations editions was November 12, 2019.

      You can also go to
      Windows 10 release information
      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/release-information/
      Scroll further down and you will also be able to see Version 1803 is (OS build 17134)
      In that section you will see the OS Build is 17134.1130 with an availability date of 2019-11-12.

      Now let’s see if you can determine what your Windows Update information is on your PC.
      — In your Start screen, type winver in the Type here to search box.
      — The winver box will show up, click on Open
      — Run as Administrator is available but it wasn’t necessary for me to select it.
      An About Windows screen will show up and report what version you have
      — In my case its Version 1809 (OS Build 18363.628)
      — Please let us know what you have.
      After closing out that screen, go to Settings and select Update & Security
      — See what shows up on the Windows Update page
      — Then select View update history and see how that looks.
      In the left column, click on Activation. In my case it reads Windows is activated with a digital license.

      Unfortunately those will not solve the necessity for you to have to be able to use an Administrator/ password just yet.
      — But at least we’ll know what Windows 10 version is on your PC as well as verify if it’s still activated.

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2135110 Reply

      anonymous

      unfortunately, I don’t  have WIN10 on the machine in question…it has WIN7

    • #2135483 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      I tried pressing enter when the screen comes up asking for an administrator password.

      It just did a circle and returned to the same screen

      William Sharp

    • #2135493 Reply

      anonymous

      If you cannot enter bios as an administrator, and cannot boot from other devices, most next steps I can think of remove the hard drive.  There is one trick that I think has been mentioned above, where you intentionally corrupt the system to allow it to boot to the repair menu.  If I guess right though, there is just as much chance that it will not boot at all as do that.  To do that trick, you force power down the computer when it is actively writing to the disk, usually by holding the power button for many seconds (instead of just pressing for a moment, which starts a normal, not a forced shutdown).  You may have to do this a dozen times for it to cause the right kind of corruption to boot into the repair menu.

      Even if you got into that menu you would need to enter a series of unusual commands to activate an administrator user.  Even if you did that, the unusual Toshiba connection between user accounts and the bios means that failure I think is almost certain.  Computers with a locked bios or unknown bios password sell on auction sites as “for parts” for pennies on the dollar, they are basically considered trash.

      If you find a local computer pro, or someone who can remove the hard drive, there might be some hope.  But, I think that you may have to consider that the computer is basically trash, and if it is possible to use it to install a few programs as user or to run existing software like a browser or word processor that is all it will ever be able to do.

      There are several sites that sell various priced software to reset an administrator windows (not bios) password, like isunshare, but most of those I think expect you to be able to boot a boot disk.  The only good news is since nobody knows the administrator password, it is much less likely for a virus to do much damage.

    • #2135550 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      unfortunately, I don’t  have WIN10 on the machine in question…it has WIN7

      Is that you Bill? Sorry for forgetting about that. My bad.

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2135616 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Bill, have you tried to reset the BIOS password as suggested here.

      Hi Bill,

      I came across this video this morning for clearing the passwords in a Toshiba NB505’s BIOS. Others should review the video so that they can chime in as to whether or not this might resolve your issue. See:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P516wdYnlYI

      Best regards,

      –GTP

      cheers, Paul

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by  Paul T.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2136131 Reply

      mledman
      AskWoody Plus

      Paul, I have been away for a few weeks, but I did try to use the Pogostick program. I download it, unzipped it, got into BIOS and set the system to boot from my USB disc where the Pogostick program is. I think because I can only sign on as a user, the changes didn’t “take.” I’m still stuck with the machine asking for an administrator password. Thanks for trying to help me. William Sharp

      Did you make the “usb disk” with the Pogostick program on it bootable?  If not , the computer can not boot from it.

      Win 10 home - 1909
      Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

    • #2136193 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      Bill, have you tried to reset the BIOS password as suggested here.

      Hi Bill,

      I came across this video this morning for clearing the passwords in a Toshiba NB505’s BIOS. Others should review the video so that they can chime in as to whether or not this might resolve your issue. See:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P516wdYnlYI

      Best regards,

      –GTP

      cheers, Paul

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by  Paul T.

      Bill please try the jumper process in that video.
      — I have reviewed that process and have also done that on a couple of PC’s over the years.
      — If that video doesn’t open on your PC, open it on a PC that works normally so you can follow the instructions.

      Also is the time/date still set to it’s first date for your PC and cannot be corrected?

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by  cmptrgy.
    • #2136196 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      Paul, I have been away for a few weeks, but I did try to use the Pogostick program. I download it, unzipped it, got into BIOS and set the system to boot from my USB disc where the Pogostick program is. I think because I can only sign on as a user, the changes didn’t “take.” I’m still stuck with the machine asking for an administrator password. Thanks for trying to help me. William Sharp

      Did you make the “usb disk” with the Pogostick program on it bootable?  If not , the computer can not boot from it.

      Can that process be completed using a non-admin account?

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2141222 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Well guys, I did the procedure shown in the Youtube video of using a copper wire to jump the memory.  When restarted, the machine went to a screen that looked like the one I have seen in the past when I was trying to restart into safe mode.

      Clicking on the option at the bottom of the list took me into BIOS.  It was the same screen I have seen before that does not include anything related to administrator.

      When I exited, I was returned to the Widows user sign in screen.

      I’m not making headway on getting to a place where I can install WIN 10.  I like the size of this little machine and know it would be a hit with grandkids.  After a year and a half of help from you folks, I may need to give up.

      William Sharp

    • #2141263 Reply

      Rick Corbett
      AskWoody_MVP

      Bill,

      As this is a Toshiba NB505 netbook it doesn’t have the ability to boot from USB, only from HD, LAN or SD card (using the F12 key to display the boot menu from the Toshiba power-on screen). The SD boot option is only visible when an SD card is present in the shared memory card reader (which I think is at the very front of the netbook).

      So, as booting from LAN, CD and/or USB are all not possible, that leaves creating a bootable SD card. It will involve downloading Rufus (a free utility) to create a bootable SD card using a password reset disk image. I suggest using the Offline NT Password & Registry Editor (another free utility) as this is one I have used successfully many times before. The SD card needed is tiny… the password reset image is less than 20 MB.

      Is this something you want to try and, if so, do you have a spare SD card? If the answer is YES to both then I can create a step-by-step guide.

      Hope this helps…

      • #2141295 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        Rick, I don’t have an SD card but will get one.  I see the slot…have never used it before.  Sure would love to get this old guy running on WIN 10.  Will let you know when I have the little card.

        William Sharp

        • #2141300 Reply

          jabeattyauditor
          AskWoody Lounger

          Rick, I don’t have an SD card but will get one.  I see the slot…have never used it before.  Sure would love to get this old guy running on WIN 10.  Will let you know when I have the little card.

          Bill, if you can boot from the SD card, I wouldn’t even bother hacking the Windows 7 admin password. Just setup the SD as a bootable Windows 10 installer, boot it up, and do the install straight from there.

          • #2141354 Reply

            Rick Corbett
            AskWoody_MVP

            Just setup the SD as a bootable Windows 10 installer, boot it up, and do the install straight from there.

            It won’t be possible using an SD card as their maximum size is limited to 2GB and the Windows 10 installer is more than twice that size.

            It would have to be an SDHC card of 8GB minimum.

            To be honest I have my doubts whether the netbook will handle Windows 10. Unless it’s had a RAM upgrade to its maximum of 2GB, it’s only got 1GB of RAM and a single-core 1.66 GHz Atom processor (and a slow HDD).

            I’ve put Windows 10 on similarly-specced Acer Aspire One and Asus EEE netbooks and performance was so dire they were almost unusable even with RAM maxed out. You have to do a lot of tweaking (like disabling services and scheduled tasks) to get them going without the ‘activity’ spinner having an almost constant presence. I wiped them and put Linux Mint XFCE on instead. Even then they are slow… but at least usable. (In fact, I’ll be using an Acer Aspire One D260A netbook with 1.6GHz Atom processor and 1GB RAM to test any bootable SD I create as it’s almost identical to Bill’s Toshiba NB505 netbook.)

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2141654 Reply

              Bill
              AskWoody Plus

              The program won’t let me change date and time without the administrator password on the WIN 7 machine.

              I am about to run to the store and buy an SD card.  On-line there are several that have capacities of 32, 64 and 128 GB.

              The RAM has previously been upgraded to 2 GB.  That’s the max this little device can handle.

              It has 116 GB of storage on the hard drive.

              William Sharp

            • #2141661 Reply

              Rick Corbett
              AskWoody_MVP

              A previous post showed you were going out to get an SD card. There’s 2 ways of going about this:

              1. Get an SD card. This will have a maximim capacity of 2GB ‘cos that’s all the specification calls for. However, an SD card is more than sufficient to create bootable password reset media. I’ve found an tiny little 32MB SD card to use in order to create and test the instructions.

              2. Get an SDHC card. This will have a higher capacity. You will need a minimum capacity of 8GB in order to create a bootable Win 10 installer. I’ve found an 8GB SDHC card to use.

              Let me know which route you want to take so I know which instructions to begin creating.

              (Note: There is nothing stopping you from creating bootable password reset media using an SDHC card so an SDHC card offers greater flexibility.)

              Hope this helps…

      • #2152922 Reply

        Bill
        AskWoody Plus

        I bought an SD card.  It is loaded in the computer and seems to work fine.  I copied a couple of file to it and then deleted them.

        William Sharp

        • #2152948 Reply

          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          Bill, it’s best to test at this point that your netbook can see the SD card from its boot menu.

          Shut your netbook down then, with the SD card in the memory card reader, power it up and press the F12 key when the Toshiba boot logo appears. If you catch it right then a boot menu should appear. If the boot menu does appear, press and hold the power button until the netbook powers itself off. (If the boot menu doesn’t appear then your netbook will just boot into Windows as per normal.)

          Let us know how you get on…

          Obviously you won’t actually be able to boot from the SD card yet (as it hasn’t yet been made bootable) but this test will show whether the SD card is recognised by the BIOS from ‘power on’.

          As you’ve bought an SD card I’ll prepare step-by-step instructions for creating a bootable SD card to run the Offline NT Password & Registry Editor. The instructions will be in 2 parts:

          1. Creating a bootable SD card to run the Offline NT Password & Registry Editor utility.

          2. Using the Offline NT Password & Registry Editor utility. It’s usually very straightforward but looks a little daunting if you’ve never used it before.

          (There’s no point me creating the second lot of instructions for using Offline NT Password & Registry Editor until you confirm that the bootable SD card actually boots to the utility.)

          Hope this helps…

          • #2152973 Reply

            mledman
            AskWoody Plus

            As per the Users guide-

            Since the system is a quick-booting system, you must press the keys
            immediately after pressing the power button

            Win 10 home - 1909
            Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

          • #2153006 Reply

            Bill
            AskWoody Plus

            In BIOS under “boot” I have:

            HDD/SSD

            FDD

            LAN

            USB-Generic-Muli-card-(USB 2.0)

            With Windows open-in the only user account that is operating-it shows the SD card

            William Sharp

            • #2153008 Reply

              Rick Corbett
              AskWoody_MVP

              Bill, It looks like the media card reader is connected to the hardware bus controlling USB. To check, power off the netbook, remove the SD card, power on again and press F12.

              If the ‘USB-Generic-Multi-card-(USB 2.0)’ disappears from the boot menu then this will confirm a) that the entry relates to the SD card and b) the SD card is recognised as a boot-capable device.

              Hope this helps…

            • #2153171 Reply

              Bill

              I removed the SD card, went into BIOS and the USB option was not on the boot list.

            • #2153338 Reply

              Rick Corbett
              AskWoody_MVP

              OK, that shows how the boot menu identifies the SD card – as ‘USB-Generic-Multi-card-(USB 2.0)’.

              Now – step 1 – to make the SD card bootable:

              1. Create a temporary folder, say C:Temp. This is just so downloaded files can be unpacked, kept together and not misplaced.
              2. Download Rufus from the following direct link – Rufus 3.8 (1.1 MB) and save it to the temporary folder. Rufus will be used to create the bootable device from an ISO file of the utility.
              3. Download the CD version (*not* the USB version) of Offline NT Password & Registry Editor from the following direct link – cd140201.zip (~18MB) and save the zip file to the temporary folder.
                (Even though it seems more logical, I could not get the USB version to work properly… and the instructions are more complicated.)
              4. Unzip the Offline NT Password & Registry Editor zip file to the temporary folder then delete the zip file. You should be left with just two files in the temporary folder – cd140201.iso and rufus-3.8.exe.
              5. Remove any USB storage devices that are attached to the device (this is important so there’s absolutely no chance of choosing the wrong device), ensure that the SD card is in the memory card reader then double-click on the rufus-3.8.exe file.
              6. When Rufus opens, double-check that the Device dropdown (at the top) has selected the drive containing the SD card correctly.
              7. Click on the Select button (a) then navigate to and select the cd140201.iso file.
              8. Confirm that the Target system (b) and File system (c) are set as per the screenshot below then click on the Start button (d).
                rufus_settings
              9. When creation of the bootable SD card is complete, close Rufus.

              Post back when you get to this stage.

              Hope this helps…

              (The next stage is going to be a little tricky to document. I’m going to have to see whether I can use a virtual machine so I can get clear screenshots. If not then I’ll have to take photos of my netbook and hope I can get them well-focussed and level)

              Attachments:
              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2154134 Reply

              Bill
              AskWoody Plus

              I downloaded and installed the rufus and cd402201 files and then put them on the SD card.  Those are the only two files on the card.

              I removed all devices plugged into the machine…including the receiver for the wireless mouse.

              I started the machine, went into BIOS.  Under the boot tab I chose the SD card, hit enter to save the change, went to exit and hit enter to save the change.

              I immediately manually powered the machine off.

              When I restarted, it went to boot from the hard drive.

              It seems to not accept any changes unless I enter as administrator.

               

              William Sharp

            • #2154135 Reply

              jabeattyauditor
              AskWoody Lounger

              Bill, did you follow the procedures above to make the SD card bootable? You can’t just copy the files to it…

            • #2154141 Reply

              Bill
              AskWoody Plus

              I downloaded the rufus file and copied it to the SD card.

              I unzipped the cd402201 and then copies the unzipped file to the SD card.

              You’re a patient dude, Rick.

              William Sharp

            • #2160440 Reply

              mledman
              AskWoody Plus

              I downloaded the rufus file and copied it to the SD card. I unzipped the cd402201 and then copies the unzipped file to the SD card.

              This is not the correct procedure. The two files, cd140201.iso and rufus-3.8.exe should be on your computer, not the SD card.  Once you have moved the files to your computer, follow Rick’s instructions at post #2153338 starting at step 5.

              Win 10 home - 1909
              Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

            • #2169357 Reply

              Bill
              AskWoody Plus

              I cannot download any files directed to the WIN7 machine…or delete any files or move any files without the  administrator password.

              I thought what I was doing was forcing the machine to look at the SD card.

              I will try again.

              William Sharp

            • #2169382 Reply

              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              You don’t need to download them to the W7 machine.
              Leave them on the machine you downloaded them to, then run Rufus to burn the ISO to the SD card.

              cheers, Paul

            • #2169415 Reply

              mledman
              AskWoody Plus

              Bill,

              You are trying to install an operating system (Offline NT Password & Registry Editor) onto your SD card and then use the SD card to boot your Toshiba.

              I downloaded the rufus file and copied it to the SD card. I unzipped the cd402201 and then copies the unzipped file to the SD card.

              If you did this with your windows 10 computer, you can use your windows 10 computer to create the bootable SD card.  Copy the files (cd140201.iso and rufus-3.8.exe) to your windows 10 desktop and follow Rick’s instructions starting with step 5.  Remove any usb storage devices to be certain the rufus program is burning the Offline NT Password & Registry Editor to the SD card.

              Once the rufus program is running, make sure the top entry (device) lists your SD card.

              Win 10 home - 1909
              Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

              • This reply was modified 6 days, 14 hours ago by  mledman.
            • #2161510 Reply

              cmptrgy
              AskWoody Plus

              “I immediately manually powered the machine off.”
              — Can you shut the machine down normally by going to the Start button, clicking on the Power icon and then selecting Shut down instead?

              “It seems to not accept any changes unless I enter as administrator.”
              — Were you asked for an administrator password when making changes and then selecting to save changes and exit the UEFI BIOS?

              HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2141276 Reply

      anonymous

      The least disreputable company I have heard about that helps log in to a windows administrator when you don’t know the password is isunshare.  When you buy their products  one report was that they provided helpful support.

    • #2141321 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      Bill’s post #2141222
      “Clicking on the option at the bottom of the list took me into BIOS. It was the same screen I have seen before that does not include anything related to administrator.”
      — Were you able to correct the date/time in the BIOS w/o being requested for an administrator password or whatever was being requested before?
      — Go back and see if you can do that.
      — That is very important and it reminds me of the Y2K days.
      — After that I would consider exiting by selecting default settings.

      “When I exited, I was returned to the Widows user sign in screen.”
      — What occurred? Were you asked for Administrator password as before?

      “I’m not making headway on getting to a place where I can install WIN 10.”
      — I want to believe you are on the verge of getting there.

      In your post #211161
      “I am asked for a password as the machine powers on.”
      — Do you still have to do that?

      In your post #1874187
      “I want to find a way to wipe the hard drive. Can’t figure out how to do that without a password.”
      — If the BIOS is set back to normal especially in default settings, that should be possible but not within Windows.

      With all of that said I just read the Rick’s post #2141263 and I see he can help you with a step-by-step guide which I believe is very applicable to your situation.

      Post #2087991 includes the Toshiba NB500/NB505/NB520/NB525 NB550D/NB555D Series manual
      — Is this the correct manual for your unit?
      http://web1.toshiba.ca/support/isg/manuals/pll5fc/NB500_NB520_NB525_NB550D_NB555D_EnglishManual.pdf
      Page 26/137: actual page 2-1 shows the Memory media slot on the front of the unit as 1.
      Page 28/137: actual page 2-3 shows the Universal Serial Bus (USB 2.0) port on the Left side of the unit as 6.
      — Rick would it be possible to use that USB port to boot by?

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

      • #2141345 Reply

        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        Rick would it be possible to use that USB port to boot by?

        I haven’t been able to confirm from any Toshiba site but from what I read on forums elsewhere the BIOS does not support boot from USB, only HDD/LAN/SD.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2170266 Reply

          Bill
          AskWoody Plus

          I carefully copied the downloaded rufus-3.8.exe, opened it, got a screen matching the screen shot in your previous post and copied it to the temp folder I created on my WIN 10 desktop.  I upzipped the downloaded cd140201.zip and got cd140201.iso and moved it to the temp folder.

          I then copied the two files in the temp folder to the SD card that is inserted in the WIN 7 machine.

          I checked to make sure there were no other devices plugged into the WIN 7 machine.

          I clicked on the rufus file and immediately got the screen asking for an administrator password.

          William Sharp

          • #2170297 Reply

            mledman
            AskWoody Plus

            I then copied the two files in the temp folder to the SD card that is inserted in the WIN 7 machine.

            You’re not going to copy any files to the SD card.   Using your WIN 10 computer, Rufus 3.8.exe is going to burn the cd140201.iso file to the SD card, creating a tool on the SD card to fix your Toshiba computer.

            The two files, rufus-3.8.exe and cd140201.iso, stay in the temp folder you created on your WIN 10 computer.  The SD card also goes in your WIN 10 computer.  Now follow Rick’s instructions at post #2153338 starting with step 5.

            Close the Rufus program when it is done, then remove the SD card.  Post back when you are done and Rick will give you the next steps.

            Win 10 home - 1909
            Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

            • #2170307 Reply

              mledman
              AskWoody Plus

              To late to edit:

              In Rick’s step 6, make absolutely certain the device listed (at the top) is your SD card.  If you are not sure, stop, and post back.

              Win 10 home - 1909
              Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

    • #2141403 Reply

      anonymous

      After you tried the jumper trick, will BIOS allow you in to change settings.  If yes, go fix the date/time, then exit and boot Windows normally.

    • #2141509 Reply

      anonymous

      Rick Corbett is probably right and Windows 10 on that speed CPU with 1 or even 2gb of ram may be too slow.  Still, hopefully you can be helped getting Windows 7 running properly, by using a password reset bootable SD card to activate or login to an admin account.

    • #2141658 Reply

      Bill
      AskWoody Plus

      Are the things I am writing getting to you guys?

      I don’t them among the various posts.

       

      William Sharp

    • #2141681 Reply

      garlin
      AskWoody Plus

      I hear it’s been a long ordeal, but fixing the BIOS date is the key.  If there’s no BIOS password, or even if one exists, there should be no restriction on updating clock from the basic setup menu.  Administrator passwords are designed to block more sensitive details like changing boot devices, network or enabling advanced security options.

      When your original backup battery went dead, and after replacing it the BIOS will reset to some factory date.  Typically it will be several years behind, even if you’ve been using a new battery for a while. If you had rights to change time from Windows, BIOS would sync to match.

      Windows security model doesn’t like it when the current time is long past, or in the far future, when checked against its last written settings.  This problem might be that simple that a BIOS edit can fix.

    • #2141756 Reply

      cmptrgy
      AskWoody Plus

      I hear it’s been a long ordeal, but fixing the BIOS date is the key.  If there’s no BIOS password, or even if one exists, there should be no restriction on updating clock from the basic setup menu.  Administrator passwords are designed to block more sensitive details like changing boot devices, network or enabling advanced security options.

      When your original backup battery went dead, and after replacing it the BIOS will reset to some factory date.  Typically it will be several years behind, even if you’ve been using a new battery for a while. If you had rights to change time from Windows, BIOS would sync to match.

      Windows security model doesn’t like it when the current time is long past, or in the far future, when checked against its last written settings.  This problem might be that simple that a BIOS edit can fix.

      Bill’s post #2141654
      “The program won’t let me change date and time without the administrator password on the WIN 7 machine.”

      Bill has been constantly requested to use an unknown administrator password trying to work in Windows as well as in the BIOS.

      HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

    • #2141789 Reply

      garlin
      AskWoody Plus

      I take back my previous statement, after reading this Toshiba doc. This is BIOS is highly unusual (read: weird).  Maybe these instructions will work for him, now that the jumper trick might have worked.

      https://support.dynabook.com/support/viewContentDetail?contentId=108503

      But there’s hope:

      To change or remove the BIOS Password, it’s necessary to know the existing password. Otherwise, it can only be removed by a Toshiba Authorized Service Provider. To locate a Toshiba Authorized Service Provider (ASP) anywhere in the world, visit Toshiba’s Global ASP Locator at: http://pcrepair.toshiba.com

      Bill mentioned he’s near KC, and there’s two service providers located in Overland Park and Lenexa.

    • #2170286 Reply

      anonymous

      See this post https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/win-7-administrator-password/#post-2169415

      You want to use a different computer to perform steps 4 and beyond to create the SD card.  The different computer, runs rufus to I will call it “burn” the ISO to the SD card.  Not simple copying.  Once the SD card is made bootable in this way you put it back in the Toshiba and try to boot it.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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