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  • Win10 Fall Creators Update cumulative update KB 4054517 refusing to install

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Win10 Fall Creators Update cumulative update KB 4054517 refusing to install

    This topic contains 68 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  PKCano 11 months ago.

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    • #152868 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      UPDATES: See my Computerworld Woody on Windows article.

      I saw the first heads up here on AskWoody, from @jwhiz56. He says: This KB installed on my MS Surface Pro 3, my HP HPDV8T laptop but refuses to install

      [See the full post at: Win10 Fall Creators Update cumulative update KB 4054517 refusing to install]

    • #152877 Reply

      radosuaf
      AskWoody Lounger

      LOL xD – as Windows 10 target audience says…

      MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit
    • #152878 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Lounger

      Has anybody encounter[ed] the problem?

      On the version you recommend no one should have installed? Who are you asking?

      Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant "Toxic drinker"

      • #152883 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Because it’s yet another reason why people should avoid 1709.

        (And, in spite of myself, I feel empathy for people who let 1703 upgrade them to 1709.)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #152948 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody MVP

        I imagine Woody is asking the many, many folks who might not have full control over their computers and have been pushed by Microsoft into upgrading to v1709 before it’s good enough to be their operating system.

        This whole thing is kind of reminiscent of when Microsoft moved from booting into DOS then starting Windows to a system that boots directly into Windows – and for how many years there were gotchas where people could get into “you can’t get there from here” situations.

        Except this time we’ve already seen them do better in the past.

        -Noel

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #152982 Reply

        anonymous

        b said;
        On the version you recommend no one should have installed? Who are you asking?

        Woody are probably asking those Win 10 users who had been “digitally-assulted” by M$ with forced auto-updates and upgrades.

        Edited for content

    • #152880 Reply

      anonymous

      Spent 5 hours yesterday, including a support session with a Microsoft tech trying to install the kb4054517. Ultimately, I was able to hide the update (hoping it never comes back) and move on. Quality Assurance (QA) at Microsoft is as dismal as Apple’s these days.

       

    • #152884 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Just got this tweet from @ComradeArthur:

      “Has anybody encounter the problem? ” YES I’ve given up on fixing it. I’d settle for simply blocking further attempts by Windows10UpdateAssistant. But I can’t get the darn thing off my computer. It tries to update 2 or 3 times a day! do you know how to BLOCK it?

      • #152991 Reply

        ky41083
        AskWoody Lounger

        Probably need to clear out the C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\Download folder, after blocking the update.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #153331 Reply

          ArtKi
          AskWoody Lounger

          That’s a good idea.  I did it.

          Meanwhile, another update attempt seems to have slipped in while my back was turned and it will try and do something useless and possibly harmful the next time I reboot.

          ———

          Had another idea on how to block it.


          Delete the files from the Windows10Upgrade directory
          Leave directory in place
          Go to PROPERTIES, SECURITY for that folder and take away Administrator’s write privilege

          Haven’t done it because windows is making me think I can’t reverse that.
          And I’m not sure what’ll happen with Win10update tries to write in that directory.
          Will it hang my PC?  Will it try to create the file over and over again causing a mess?

          • #153337 Reply

            MrBrian
            AskWoody MVP

            Your post reminded me of this post of mine.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #153350 Reply

              ArtKi
              AskWoody Lounger

              Ok!
              I just did that thing (DENY to mr. SYSTEM on WRITE) and we’ll see how it works.

              The failed attempts at updating haven’t been bothering me so much as the feeling that, eventually, they’ll screw things up in a serious way and brick my PC.

            • #153400 Reply

              ArtKi
              AskWoody Lounger

              OMG Win10 is so persistent. It’s like a terminator.

              I put DENY on everything for that folder for SYSTEM … and it still tried to do the update.

              Then I tried this.

              I make a 0 length text file in that directory. (after deleting all other files)
              Renamed it to “Windows10UpgraderApp.exe”
              set every imaginable permission for that file to DENY for every user.

              A few minutes ago Win10 threw up a whiny little error message saying it didn’t have permission to overwrite that file.

              Success!

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #153404 Reply

              woody
              Da Boss
    • #152891 Reply

      samak
      AskWoody Lounger

      I love my W7 more and more…

      W7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit, Office 2010, Group B, non-techie

      8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #152918 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody MVP

        I love Linux Mint more and more.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #152919 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        I love my Macs more and more!

        6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #152949 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody MVP

        I love my Win 8.1 pretty much the same. However, I can stand Windows 10 and Microsoft’s policy shifts less and less.

        -Noel

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #154561 Reply

          WildBill
          AskWoody Lounger

          Ditto, Neil. Dependability in an OS is important to me. The only thing dependable about Windows 10… is that it Isn’t. My long-term loyalty to Microsoft is waning & if that doesn’t change in 5+ years… I may actually buy a Chromebook!

          Windows 8.1, 64-bit, now in Group B!
          Wild Bill Rides Again...

      • #152973 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        I don’t love my Windows. That’s what MS is trying to achieve with Windows 10. It’s just an operating system – it’s supposed to work and nothing more. I may have loved “Bioshock” when I first played it, but I’m now not even 100% sure if I ran it on W7 or W8.1.

        MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit
        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #152899 Reply

      PKCano
      AskWoody MVP

      I have successfully updated 2 Win10 Pro 1703 and 1 Win10 Pro 1709 with no glitches. No upgrades were forced on the 1703s. No updates were downloaded/installed without my approval.

      1703s (KB4053580 CU, KB4053577 IE Flash, KB2267602 Defender, KB890830 MSRT)
      1709S (KB4054517 CU, KB4053577 IE Flash, KB4058043 MS Store, KB890830 MSRT)

      My Settings are:
      1703 CBB (which is ignored), 1709 SAC
      Defer feature updates 365 days
      Defer quality updates 0 days
      In Group Policy Admin Templates\Windows components\Delivery Optimization = 99 Simple (simple download, no peering, HTTP, no DO)
      In Group Policy Admin Templates\Windows components\Windows Updates ConfigureAutoUpdates is Enabled = 2 (ask download/install)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #152906 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Any guess why KB 4054517 would refuse to install?

        Sure has me puzzled….

        • #152907 Reply

          PKCano
          AskWoody MVP

          Perhaps the Anti=virus. I’m using TrendMicro (paid) and Bitdefender Free with no problems. But some of the other brands are not so kind.

          The major other problem that I’ve seen most of in the past is the Graphics component (not video drivers) – but there doesn’t seem to be error codes or as many BSODs this time.

          • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  PKCano.
          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #153033 Reply

          johnf
          AskWoody Lounger

          Woody, has anyone reported a difference between systems that were “Clean Installs” (full format/install of W10) vs systems upgraded from Windows 7/8.1 to W10 for some of these update issues?

    • #152904 Reply

      anonymous

      Yep, “failed installation”  seems to be the word.

    • #152912 Reply

      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      I still can’t work out why so many people continue to put up with Windows 10? Apart from the MS fanboys I’ve seen on various forums (who seem to reach a state of rapture every time a new insider build is released – and, at the same time appear to suffer withdrawal symptoms when a new build isn’t released almost daily) I can’t understand why anyone would want to continue to punish themselves with this perpetual beta (alpha??) operating system?

      Honestly, you would think after all the telemetry that MS has collected from the millions of unpaid beta testers over the past several years that W10 would be the best/most secure Windows version yet (how many times have we heard that one over the years?).

      Meanwhile, back here in Windows 7 land, it is (mostly) all clear skies and smooth sailing – no forced updates which seem to break things more often than not these days, no ads (hint to MS – the amount of acceptable ads in a paid for operating system is ZERO), no new version every 6 months which usually involves a complete clean install of W10,  etc., etc.

      I like to use my computer for getting things done, even if it is just playing games – not spend half the day trying to fix MS’s mistakes.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #152962 Reply

        zero2dash
        AskWoody Lounger

        Most of your grievances are solved by tweaking it and setting both branch readiness and deferral of feature and quality updates. Once controlled that way, 10 is easily the best version of Windows you can run. As for the telemetry, if you tweak that, you transmit no more data than any version before it. You can’t run 7 or 8.1 forever… the clock is ticking, after all.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #152963 Reply

          Kirsty
          AskWoody MVP

          I don’t believe “branch readiness and deferral of feature and quality updates” is available in all versions though, sadly.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #153015 Reply

            zero2dash
            AskWoody Lounger

            You can make the changes via registry in Win10 Home.
            It doesn’t seem to respect the branch readiness setting (as I’ve still been offered the 1709 upgrade), but wushowhide fixes that.
            Otherwise, quality updates don’t install for the specified time which is fine by me…I have that set to 30 days, which puts it in the window of when the DEFCON improves.

        • #152974 Reply

          radosuaf
          AskWoody Lounger

          You can’t run 7 or 8.1 forever… the clock is ticking, after all.

          +5 years (for W8.1) is pretty d**n long in IT by any standards… And, while you can easily run W8.1 on your current setup until 2023 safely (there will be no changes that would make your hardware obsolete), you can’t be sure that Windows 1803, 1809 or any later version will simply refuse to install on your system. Hence – while you’re safe to say that W8.1 you can run for the next +5 years, it’s not safe to say that any hardware will run W10 1803 – and that’ll be in 4 months.

          It’s been 2 years and I haven’t come across any DX12 exclusive game I’d want to play. There are no other obvious reasons to jump in this pond. And quite a few against.

          MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit
          • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  radosuaf.
          • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  PKCano.
          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #153020 Reply

            zero2dash
            AskWoody Lounger

            The DX12 exclusivity means nothing to me (though I am a gamer with over 1K games in my Steam library, and at least 50% of my home PC use is for games). They dropped the ball with that and I doubt they’ll ever get the DX12 support they hoped for.

            IMHO one of the most meaningful reasons to run 10 is multitasking with multiple monitors. If that’s not you, by all means, don’t run it.

            8.1 is (in hindsight) a decent OS. 8 was a disaster, but 8.1 fixed a lot of the problems. I actually don’t mind the Start screen anymore, as I’ve grown accustomed to making my way around it.
            The thing that irritates me the most about 8/8.1 is the Charms menu and the Settings – obviously, this has been exacerbated in 10, where they’ve continued taking stuff out of Control Panel and putting it in Settings.

            • #153074 Reply

              radosuaf
              AskWoody Lounger

              IMHO one of the most meaningful reasons to run 10 is multitasking with multiple monitors.

              That’s not me :). But I have Win 10 1607 + Excel 2016 on a T460s and getting it stuck completely is not at all a problem…

              MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit
        • #152984 Reply

          anonymous

          zero2dash said;
          Most of your grievances are solved by tweaking it and setting both branch readiness and deferral of feature and quality updates. Once controlled that way, 10 is easily the best version of Windows you can run. As for the telemetry, if you tweak that, you transmit no more data than any version before it.

          That’s only postponing the problem. You can only defer cumulative updates for about 7 days maximum. M$ have begun to not respect users’ deferral of feature updates for Win 10 1709. For Win 10 Home 1709, you can no longer stop Windows Update through the Registry setting.

          You are never in full control of Win 10, eg M$ often delete your 3rd-party programs, files/folders and settings during a feature update.

          Win 7/8.1 users have the option to not install Telemetry updates, eg KB2952664, and the monthly Rollups. Ask Noel Carboni about how he stopped nearly all Telemetry & Data collection by M$ in Win 7/8.1.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #153016 Reply

            zero2dash
            AskWoody Lounger

            That’s only postponing the problem. You can only defer cumulative updates for about 7 days maximum. M$ have begun to not respect users’ deferral of feature updates for Win 10 1709. For Win 10 Home 1709, you can no longer stop Windows Update through the Registry setting.

            I’m not running 1709 so anything changed in 1709 is not something I have visibility to (yet).
            You can defer feature updates for 365 days and quality updates for 30 days. So far, both deferrals have been followed/respected on the systems I’ve set them on.

            You are never in full control of Win 10, eg M$ often delete your 3rd-party programs, files/folders and settings during a feature update.

            I know this has happened to other people, but it hasn’t happened to me.
            Too many worms in that can to point the finger one way or another.

            Win 7/8.1 users have the option to not install Telemetry updates, eg KB2952664, and the monthly Rollups. Ask Noel Carboni about how he stopped nearly all Telemetry & Data collection by M$ in Win 7/8.1.

            Yes, I know this very well.
            You still transmit the same amount of telemetry (opting out of CEIP) in 10 that you do in earlier versions of Windows; this has since been proven repeatedly by MrBrian, abbodi, and others.
            As for Noel – he runs a tight ship, he blocks things in his router. Most people are not going to be that fanatical about it. I have a college degree in Network System Administration and enough Cisco iOS expertise to be dangerous, but I’m not blocking MS IP’s in my router at home because I find no reason to do so.

            10 is not perfect, but like I said and I’ll stick to my previous point – 10 is the best version of Windows released, from a usability and multitasking standpoint. The additions to Explorer (that were not in 8.1, sorry) make 10 even better especially for users with multi monitors. You can restrict its ability to upgrade or update, same as you can with 7 and 8.1 (you just have to do it differently). My other point still stands as well…you can’t run 7 forever, nor can you run 8.1 forever. Yes, you have time; I’m not disputing that you do. I’m saying – it has an expiration date. I was still running 7 up until a few weeks ago at home, and I was not planning on switching back to 10 again. After using it every day at work (where it is even further neutered behind SCCM), I clean installed 10 1703 at home again and I’m fine with it.

            • #153036 Reply

              Seff
              AskWoody Lounger

              When you say “10 is the best version of Windows released, from a usability and multitasking standpoint” you are making a subjective opinion sound as if it were a factual statement – which it is not, it’s just your own personal experience.

              While I am happy to keep all options open until January 2020, on the present state of Windows 10 and given the nature of my gaming preferences, the future beyond that date is beginning to look like a possible extension of time by upgrading from 7 to 8.1 unless it becomes feasible to continue with 7 beyond January 2020 – which may well be the case either because MS bow to the inevitable and extend its life or else because an unsupported 7 proves to be more reliable than a supported 10, with other ways of providing protection. No non-Windows OS is likely to meet my requirements.

              However, there is plenty of time still to go, and in any event at my age I tend not to plan too far ahead!

              • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Seff.
              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #153003 Reply

        anonymous

        I like to use my computer for getting things done, even if it is just playing games – not spend half the day trying to fix MS’s mistakes.

        That brings me back bad old memories of

        //wasted night

        repeat{

        install Win95 (bunch of floppies, more_than_1_hour);

        } until (win95 >= stable_enough);

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #153007 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody MVP

        Meanwhile, back here in Windows 7 land, it is (mostly) all clear skies and smooth sailing – no forced updates which seem to break things more often than not these days, no ads (hint to MS – the amount of acceptable ads in a paid for operating system is ZERO), no new version every 6 months which usually involves a complete clean install of W10, etc., etc.

        I agree with you on this.

        By the way, have you thought about what you’re going to do when January 2020 arrives?

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        • #153043 Reply

          anonymous

          One word of warning: BUY A SPARE PRINTER, compatible with Win7, BEFORE Win7’s end-of-life date.  After that, the printer manufacturer will be forbidden by MS to supply the Win7 driver for the printer (because some required component is actually an MS file).

          I have experience of this: shortly after Win98’s end-of-life, I bought a (USB interface) HP inkjet which the merchant advertised as “Win98-compatible”.  (I also needed a parallel port interface, to use it with MS-DOS 5 and 6 for plain text, but that’s another story).  Inside the box, to my dismay, was a flier saying “HP can’t supply the Win98 driver any longer, MS says NO”.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #153104 Reply

          Carl D
          AskWoody Lounger

          Meanwhile, back here in Windows 7 land, it is (mostly) all clear skies and smooth sailing – no forced updates which seem to break things more often than not these days, no ads (hint to MS – the amount of acceptable ads in a paid for operating system is ZERO), no new version every 6 months which usually involves a complete clean install of W10, etc., etc.

          I agree with you on this. By the way, have you thought about what you’re going to do when January 2020 arrives?

          Jim, I plan on using a dual boot of Windows 7 offline and Linux (Mint probably) online after January 2020. Assuming my present motherboard, etc. is still working by then.

          If I have to get a new setup that won’t let you run Windows 7 (I’m using W7 on Kaby Lake at the moment despite MS’s attempt to block updates earlier this year – I got around that quite easily) I will probably “bite the bullet” and install Windows 10. But, I will keep W10 offline and use Linux online.

    • #152920 Reply

      anonymous

      For what it’s worth:
      I have Win10 system Home version 1709 I got to help troubleshoot my wife’s computer. I
      turned it on to update the anit-virus (Norton) and it proceeded to upload and attempt to install

      KB4054517 – Cumulative Win 10 Update
      KB4058043 – Win10 Update
      KB890830 – MSRT
      KB4053577 – Adobe Flash Update

      The KB4054517 – Cumulative Update Installed successfully and requested a restart, the other
      three all “Failed Installation”. When I restarted the computer for KB4054517, the three
      updates that failed immediately (as soon as the desktop appeared so I could check) installed
      themselves successfully.

      Gene

      Edit to correct Win10 version

      • #152927 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Fixed it 🙂

      • #153079 Reply

        krzemien
        AskWoody Lounger

        For what it’s worth, the same here on my HP Omen Win10 x64 FCU (1709):

        KB4054517 – Cumulative Win 10 Update
        KB890830 – MSRT
        KB4053577 – Adobe Flash Update

        All deployed okay on Tue 13/12.

        KB4058043 – Win10 Update

        Added on Sat 16/12.

    • #152936 Reply

      Cybertooth
      AskWoody Lounger

      This may not be the best place for  the following, but here goes anyway…

      Today I was doing maintenance on a relative’s Windows 10 computer, when the Java Updater popped up announcing the availability of the newest version of Java. I clicked on it, and when the Java installer came up, Windows 10 launched a big window warning me that “this app did not come from the Windows Store”, and did I want to proceed anyway?

      Note that this wasn’t a traditional UAC prompt. Rather, it was specifically warning against installing something that wasn’t from their store. I had never before seen this kind of attempt to herd users into the walled garden of MS. The course Windows is being taken on  is coming increasingly into focus.

      • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Cybertooth.
      • This reply was modified 12 months ago by  Noel Carboni.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #152939 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Somewhere in the settings there is a check box that says “install from anywhere.” Probably under the apps and features setting. Maybe someone changed the default.

        Oh, and turn off Smart Screen Filter on the desktop.

        • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  PKCano.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #152942 Reply

      anonymous

      Loving my 1703 with all my heart. 🙂 I will only install 1709 when Microsoft gets it’s act together to fix up it’s issues including making sure it’s updates install right than being refused and to ensure nobody loses wifi connection as well.

      • #153023 Reply

        zero2dash
        AskWoody Lounger

        Same.
        1703 has been rock solid.
        The whole fiasco reminds me a lot of Vista pre and post SP1.
        (Or 8 to 8.1.)

        • #153066 Reply

          anonymous

          @ zero2dash

          Yes, but Win 10 1703 will be dead like a rock in about 10 month’s time.

          Win 10 1511 had also been rock solid during the latter part of its life.

          • #153095 Reply

            zero2dash
            AskWoody Lounger

            Not really worried about it – 1703 will have support until 9/2018.
            By then we’ll be fresh on the heels of the 1809 upgrade, and either 1709 or 1803 will surely be “good enough” to run by that time. I’m not running Prod on “bleeding edge” like MS thinks I should, but I’m not afraid to upgrade (once a build hits CBB/SAC). So far, that practice hasn’t caused any issues.

    • #152947 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody MVP

      The basic problem here is that the update can get to 99% then fail, revert, and there is NO WAY TO KNOW why. Not even if you dig with the geekiest intentions into the event logs and such files as CBS.log and other system files.

      I’ve had both 1703 and 1709 get into this mode.

      Perhaps this will push Microsoft over the edge to emit a decent description of why it’s failing. They need to be beaten up until they concede that a complete lack of reporting isn’t even a little bit acceptable!

      IdiocracyPoster

      -Noel

      Attachments:
      You must be logged in to view attached files.
      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #152960 Reply

        Kirsty
        AskWoody MVP

        The basic problem here is that the update can get to 99% then fail, revert, and there is NO WAY TO KNOW why. Not even if you dig with the geekiest intentions into the event logs and such files as CBS.log and other system files.

        It looks like there is some magic to find an error code, based on a tweet thread about KB4054517, with Jen Gentleman from MS:

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #153000 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          Sigh. I suppose I should unblock Twitter and see what folks who feel that “tweeting” things is an acceptable form of communication are saying.

          I recall searching for hex error codes, but now that more folks are having the problem Microsoft might be making some additional information available.

          The only thing I was able to do to get v1703 to v1709 is to fresh-install the v1709 OS. I had taken Win 10 from just a pup (having started with one of the very first insider pre-releases) through its many in-place upgrades all the way through v1703. v1709 was the first time I ABSOLUTELY HAD to install afresh, after which I could update it. Then I got v1709 into this mode again but was able to restore a snapshot that would update again. However, at the moment it just won’t find cumulative updates online with a Windows Update initiated by the Settings App, but it WILL successfully update from the catalog. I imagine it’s only a matter of time before it gains back the problem that is the subject of this thread.

          Is this because I have not allowed Windows 10 to update itself whenever Microsoft darn well feels like it? Maybe.

          If so… Sorry, no, I am not ever going to just give in and allow Microsoft to load updates whenever they want. If it can’t be updated only on my say so it isn’t viable for use as anything more than a curiosity in a virtual machine for me. I can’t imagine having to be without my actual computer while trying to work this kind of problem out again and again.

          -Noel

    • #152990 Reply

      jescott418
      AskWoody Lounger

      Think my Wife’s HP had issues, ran Windows update troubleshooter and it fixed the problem. Also had noted that Defender had not performed a scan in over a month too. Have not figured out if this was a connection given that Defender is updated through Windows update? Or if a corrupted update was affecting Defender. Her initial problem was black screen from sleep/hibernate which is why I began to trouble shoot in the first place.

    • #152993 Reply

      ky41083
      AskWoody Lounger

      It seems odd (or does it?) that 1709 would have update install issues like this, given that 1709 is the latest update for Windows Server…

      When Server 2016 went final, Windows 10 1607 seemed to have most of its issues figured out by that point, or shortly thereafter.

      We are “shortly thereafter” the official release of Windows Server 1709 at this point.

    • #153022 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      Defer quality updates 0 days

      Curious why you do this.
      I have mine set to 30 days.
      I do also have mine set to Automatic Updates = 2, but I have quality updates deferred for 30 days.
      That way, if WU checks, it’s not pulling updates (or even finding updates) until long after the DEFCON rating has improved.
      I figure, it’s an additional “sanity check”, which, given 10’s reduced update control, gives a little peace of mind to me, at least. 🙂

      • #153030 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        I’ve never had it violate the WU setting of 2 (ask download/install). With Quality updates deferred to 0 days, when I get ready to update I don’t have to change anything.

        PS I also keep my Win7/8.1 on “Check but let me decide whether to download and install”

      • #153622 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody MVP

        There’s another Advanced Setting to Pause Updates for 30 days. I have that checked in Win 10, ver.1703 Pro on two devices.

        -- rc primak

    • #153032 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Anton Koslov tweets:

      The only thing that helped me, was a clean reinstall from manually created ISO. After clean install, those updates installed with no problems.

      • #153063 Reply

        Kirsty
        AskWoody MVP

        A short while later, Anton reported it had allowed the KB to install, but he had new problems from there:

        Upon clean install from ISO, updates installed. However, I now can’t open any links in the browser: state repository service is high on cpu and pc freezes.

        • #153070 Reply

          anonymous

          It might take a couple of tries to get windows 10 to install properly from a clean install to a blank hard drive. (assuming you have no hardware defects)

          Once you get a good install enable system restore (off by default?!?) and install the proper drivers from your OEM (before you get online, recommend disabling driver updates). Set your privacy settings and make another restore point. Then install updates, if your OS breaks use your last restore point and repeat the undone steps. If you succeed make a restore point (and a full backup wouldn’t hurt).

          Repeat as needed (or until required tools such as system restore are removed from windows 10, or sanity levels drop too low to continue using windows 10).

    • #153042 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      When you say “10 is the best version of Windows released, from a usability and multitasking standpoint” you are making a subjective opinion sound as if it were a factual statement – which it is not, it’s just your own personal experience.

      Well, the advertised changes made to the OS for multitasking proves this to be factually correct. The features added to 10 are absent in earlier versions of Windows.

      You can throw apps at the problem, and add Sysinternals Desktops (to get virtual desktops in lieu of Task View), and other apps like DisplayFusion or UltraView and gain some of the other functionality. Again though, the features are absent in other versions of Windows.

    • #153158 Reply

      Ascaris
      AskWoody MVP

      The thing that irritates me the most about 8/8.1 is the Charms menu and the Settings – obviously, this has been exacerbated in 10, where they’ve continued taking stuff out of Control Panel and putting it in Settings.

      I use Metro Killer to eradicate them both (charms and Settings) from 8.1.  Classic Shell allows the user to disable all the hot corners that bring up the charms, but Metro Killer does something wonderful in memory that blocks anything Metro from running at all until you restart explorer.exe.  I’ve found ways of doing everything I need without Settings or anything else Metro… I use the Intel ProSet software with my wifi card on my laptop (taking the place of the Metro wireless network dialog), and I use NetSetMan for the same thing on my desktop (since it has no Intel wifi card, I can’t use ProSet).

      I use the Atheros Bluetooth suite on the desktop (which has an Atheros Bluetooth adapter built into the motherboard) and the Toshiba Bluetooth Stack on my laptop (it uses a CSR BT183) to replace the Metro Windows dialogs.  I use the management console to create new user accounts (which the “users” applet in Control Panel can no longer do in 8.1).

      Well, I use those when I am still in Windows, anyway, which is happening less and less often on my laptop (the desktop is still in Windows most of the time).  I am using the laptop under Linux Mint 18.3 now (using Waterfox) to write this.  Except for the rare case when I want to run some Windows-only games (that don’t lend themselves to WINE, particularly with my laptop’s limited performance; we’re not talking about modern AAA titles by any means), I simply don’t need Windows much anymore on the lappy.

      Group L (Linux): KDE Neon User Edition 5.14.4 (based on Ubuntu 18.04) + Windows 7 in Virtualbox VM

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #153174 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody MVP

        I haven’t tried Metro Killer, but I get zero appearance of or influence from Charms or the Start Screen or any Metro/Modern component on my Win 8.1 desktop workstation setup. It’s a pure desktop system – essentially Windows 7.1. And quite lean… It settles to 42 processes to support an idle desktop (12 of them things I’ve added), with 99.5%+ free CPU time on average.

        Thing is, Win 8.1 had been started down the dark path, but was only a limited distance from the entrance to the haunted mansion so that it could be pulled all the way back into the light through reconfiguration and augmentation. By contrast, though Win 10 responds to many of the same tweaks, it’s now so far gone with mobile/App garbage that it’s near impossible to maintain a nice, work-oriented pure desktop setup with it. As illustrated by this thread and others, Win 10 is past the “why bother?” stage and solidly into the “it’s just too much work to keep it running for no apparent gain” realm.

        -Noel

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #153267 Reply

      212louis
      AskWoody Lounger

      Microsoft’s only suggestion (forgive me if you’ve heard this one) is a clean install.

      Really? That’s their suggestion?? A clean install??? What a joke.

      No one who buys a computer should ever have to do a clean install because of an update. Ever.

      W7 x64

    • #153265 Reply

      anonymous

      Hmmm, checked for updates today and it said I was up to date. Looked at update history and that said that 4054517 failed to update on 12/17. That note had a (5) right after 4054517. As in 4054517 (5). Questions are (1) has Windows decided to stop the failed update and (2) does the (5) mean 5 attempts or what?

    • #153290 Reply

      Papaisgr8
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hi, Everyone:

      I tried installing KB 4054517 three times.  Each time, the installation failed.  So, I temporarily disabled Norton Internet Security Smart Firewall and Auto-Protect.  Within a few minutes, the update installed successfully.

      Go figure…

      John

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #153702 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP
    • #154557 Reply

      anonymous

      This is not the only problem. Also broke our WCF net.tcp connection string in Excel (Error -2147221020). Tested on 3 machines. Not upgrading or removing this update fixes the problem. Triple-checked the syntax on the connection string…

    • #159521 Reply

      anonymous

      Ty….please tell me how to fix…I’ve reset old version of windows ten…but now need net.framework 3.5 which needs the update….pl help tysm

       

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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