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  • Win10 version 1903 beta upgrade halted if you have a plugged-in USB drive or SD card

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Win10 version 1903 beta upgrade halted if you have a plugged-in USB drive or SD card

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    This topic contains 37 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by

     abbodi86 2 weeks, 6 days ago.

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    • #906801 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Mary Jo Foley reported on this yesterday: Microsoft has published a support document today warning Windows 10 users that the impending May 2019 Update
      [See the full post at: Win10 version 1809 beta upgrade halted if you have a plugged-in USB drive or SD card]

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #908280 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Man, I really blew that, didn’t I? Sorry, Catalin. And, yes, it’s 1903.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #907550 Reply

      anonymous

      Note: The drive reassignment is not limited to removable drives. Internal hard drives can also be affected.

      It isn’t just SD or USB drives. MS said it may affect internal drives as well, with very little clarification if this means that data-only drives are affected, or if it’s NVMe drives, etc.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #907811 Reply

      anonymous

      Do you mean to say “1903” in the story title?

    • #911241 Reply

      dturnidge
      AskWoody Plus

      Interesting. I have had an issue for +/- a year now, where I can’t reboot my system if I have an external drive *OR* a powered USB hub. Gets to a certain point and then, nothing. Have to disconnect drive or hub, reboot and all is well.

      Don’t know if it is related – but it would be way cool to be able to have the devices plugged in all the time…

      (Just realized the “tag” says “Win10 1903” and I’m at 1809 – fwiw…)

      Dave \o/

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by
         dturnidge.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #910686 Reply

      anonymous

      I’m 70 years old and suffer with vertigo. The last thing I need is to be crawling around under my desk trying to unhook USB’s. Will M$ ever get it right or are we just going to have to suffer through this each and every month forever ?

      • #914882 Reply

        BusinessSellCanada
        AskWoody Lounger

        You can just buy a male/female USB extension cable from the Dollar Store for a few dollars; and plug that into the back USB port of the computer to extend the Flashdrive out onto your desk … for easy removal at any time.

        If the FlashDrive is being used for something like a security backup -it is important to unmount it and physically remove it when it’s not in use; as some encryption viruses travel through to plugged-in drives as well.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #916931 Reply

          anonymous

          Thanks, good idea.

    • #913419 Reply

      jabeattyauditor
      AskWoody Lounger

      Woody, why do you say it’s only a concern for folks who are part of the Insider program? The support document from Microsoft doesn’t state that, although it does say that the issue will be fixed with a servicing update for the unwashed masses and in build 18877 and later for Insiders.

      • #913780 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        I believe v1903 has not been released to the public at this point, so it’s not relevant except to Insider rings or MSDN until it is. I don’t think it is supposed to be out for everyone until late May.

        • #914134 Reply

          jabeattyauditor
          AskWoody Lounger

          To clarify: you believe that the “servicing update” that resolves this problem will be deployed to current (non-1903) builds prior to 1903’s (May 2019 Update) release?

          I took Microsoft’s warning to indicate that the opposite would be true – that they’re close to dumping 1903 and that it would happen before a corrective servicing update.

          • #914337 Reply

            PKCano
            Da Boss

            I believe v1903 has not been released to the public at this point, so it’s not relevant except to Insider rings or MSDN until it is.

            That’s all I’m saying.  And that’s what Woody says in the last sentence of his post.

    • #913613 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Don’t go crawling around, sir!  Microsoft has already fixed the bug and it will be published shortly.  By the time your machine is offered the May 2019 Update, it won’t be a problem.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #913777 Reply

      Cybertooth
      AskWoody Lounger

      What happens if you go to remove the USB drive and you get one of those dreaded “can’t remove because the drive is in use” notifications, even though the drive is not in use? It would seem then that you’d be stuck between running the risk of losing the data on the USB drive by unplugging it (it’s happened to me), or being unable to move to the newest version of Windows 10 until Microsoft fixes the issue.

       

      • #914015 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        If you shut the computer down, the drive is on longer in use and you can remove it. Then turn the computer back on.

        You can also right click on the drive in Explorer and try “eject.” Sometimes that works when the icon in the tray does not.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #926017 Reply

        anonymous

        I was having similar issues with an external HDD but fixed it with a change of drive properties.

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #926234 Reply

          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Yes, that works for Win10, but not for Win7/8.1.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #915259 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      “Yank the USB drive or SD card, if you can”

      According to Microsoft your internal SSD/HDD devices also suffer from “inappropriate drive reassignment”. and you should yank them as well.

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by
         Alex5723.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #915884 Reply

        b
        AskWoody Plus

        According to Microsoft your internal SSD/HDD devices also suffer from “inappropriate drive reassignment”.

        IF a USB device or SD card is inserted.

        and you should yank them as well.

        Their support document doesn’t say that.

        Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker Saluted blockhead "Unwashed mass" (Group ASAP) Win10 v.1903

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #919927 Reply

          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          According to Microsoft your internal SSD/HDD devices also suffer from “inappropriate drive reassignment”.

          IF a USB device or SD card is inserted.

          They didn’t say that the internal “inappropriate drive reassignment” is dependent on external connected USB/SD.

          and you should yank them as well.

          Their support document doesn’t say that.

          That was a joke 🙂 You can’t install OS without drives.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #920398 Reply

            b
            AskWoody Plus

            They didn’t say that the internal “inappropriate drive reassignment” is dependent on external connected USB/SD.

            They certainly did. (See Cause and affected.)

            That was a joke 🙂 You can’t install OS without drives.

            Hilarious. 😂🤣🙄

            Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker Saluted blockhead "Unwashed mass" (Group ASAP) Win10 v.1903

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #916322 Reply

      EP
      AskWoody_MVP

      check out born’s recent blog about 1903 requiring 32Gb minimum storage space:

      https://borncity.com/win/2019/04/24/windows-10-v1903-requires-a-32-gb-minium-disk-space/

      could that be related to the usb and sd card problems? maybe or maybe not

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #920131 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        I haven’t seen any indication that they’re related.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #925619 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      check out born’s recent blog about 1903 requiring 32Gb minimum storage space: https://borncity.com/win/2019/04/24/windows-10-v1903-requires-a-32-gb-minium-disk-space/ could that be related to the usb and sd card problems? maybe or maybe not

      This is because of a new 1903 feature called Reserved Storage.  It pre-allocates 7 GB of disk (maybe more if you have optional features like multiple languages installed) space for application temp files, Windows Update operation, and future Feature Update installation.

      This additional space requirement only applies to new installs of Windows 10 1903…. upgrades from previous versions are not affected.

      This is the first time the disk space requirements for Windows have gone up since Windows 7, when they bumped it from 15 GB to 20 GB.

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by
         warrenrumak.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #927766 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody_MVP

        This additional space requirement only applies to new installs of Windows 10 1903…. upgrades from previous versions are not affected.

        It applies to upgrades if a specific registry value is set in advance. It is the same registry value which is set by Windows 10 1903 on a clean install.

        [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\ReserveManager]
        “ShippedWithReserves”=dword:00000001

        The question is if it is a good thing or not.
        Let’s not forget that SSD manufacturers typically reserve a much larger amount of storage during manufacturing for extending the life and improving the write performance of the SSDs. This is what is called over-provisioning and can get up to a total of 30% for performance SSDs.

        • #930402 Reply

          warrenrumak
          AskWoody Plus

          The question is if it is a good thing or not.

          In a vacuum, I guess the question is interesting.

          But…. funny thing….. the prices of most SSDs have come way, way down in the last year.  The Intel 660p 2TB came out somewhere around August, I think, and it was $350-400 USD.  Now it’s April, and you can get exactly the same drive for $200.

          A Samsung 970 Pro that was $250 a year ago, is $150 today.  WD Blue 3D NAND 1TB, $300 in December… $120 today.

          Even a dinky PNY CS900 120GB is like $25 — half of what it was just six months ago.

          Nothing has happened in the last year that would require the average person to require 2-4x the disk space, so free space is going to be easier to come by.  And when you’re getting 1,000GB for the price of 250GB a year ago, will Windows taking 7GB of that really matter, or even be noticed?

           

          • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by
             warrenrumak.
          • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by
             warrenrumak.
          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #933795 Reply

            Elly
            AskWoody MVP

            And when you’re getting 1,000GB for the price of 250GB a year ago, will Windows taking 7GB of that really matter, or even be noticed?

            Problem comes for those with low fixed incomes (on disability or retired)- who are trying extend the useful life of their hardware, and for whom W10 does not provide a lot of options. These people stretched to get their computers in the first place, and do not appreciate being updated into oblivion. There are many, many people who have to decide whether to get prescriptions filled, or pay utilities… and yes, for these people the current “low prices” for a larger hard drive absolutely matters.

            It would be different if Microsoft offered an inexpensive stable operating system that doesn’t push currently functioning hardware into oblivion. Its one of the great differences of perspective between a wealthy corporation that minimizes or ignores the effects of its decisions on Home users, and the Home user that gets BSOD or other updating failures, and is unable to recover easily. There is a tremendous amount of stress that comes with the current updating system for these people. It can and does mean the difference between having and using a computer, and doing without… and from an individual’s perspective, that can be catastrophic. It is so easy for those who have, to decide to let everyone else ‘eat cake’ too.

            Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

            3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #939050 Reply

              warrenrumak
              AskWoody Plus

              And when you’re getting 1,000GB for the price of 250GB a year ago, will Windows taking 7GB of that really matter, or even be noticed?

              Problem comes for those with low fixed incomes (on disability or retired)- who are trying extend the useful life of their hardware, and for whom W10 does not provide a lot of options. These people stretched to get their computers in the first place, and do not appreciate being updated into oblivion. There are many, many people who have to decide whether to get prescriptions filled, or pay utilities… and yes, for these people the current “low prices” for a larger hard drive absolutely matters. It would be different if Microsoft offered an inexpensive stable operating system that doesn’t push currently functioning hardware into oblivion. Its one of the great differences of perspective between a wealthy corporation that minimizes or ignores the effects of its decisions on Home users, and the Home user that gets BSOD or other updating failures, and is unable to recover easily. There is a tremendous amount of stress that comes with the current updating system for these people. It can and does mean the difference between having and using a computer, and doing without… and from an individual’s perspective, that can be catastrophic. It is so easy for those who have, to decide to let everyone else ‘eat cake’ too.

              Okay, look, this isn’t a new problem, and there is no solution.

              Back in 2005, I found myself helping an elderly lady whose son had bought her one of the first iMacs in the late 90s.  It came with Mac OS 8, and she had never upgraded to Mac OS X.  The son had died in the interrim and wasn’t around to help her out, so a family friend asked me to help her since she started having trouble getting on to a web site to read her email.  The provider had stopped supporting whatever old browser she was using.

              Her computer would’ve barely been able to run Mac OS X…. and she was resistant to the idea anyways because she was uncomfortable with changing anything, and she wasn’t in a position to afford a new Mac — and even if she had bought a new Mac, it would’ve been obsolete five years later, too.

              We could step further back to 1995 or so and talk about people I tried to help who still had a Mac Plus from the mid-80s, but weren’t able to use the latest tax & finance software (Quicken 5, I think it was?) because that year’s version wasn’t compatible with their older OS, and the newer OS didn’t work on their older system.

              I’ve got dozens of these stories.  Could easily write 20,000 words on my professional experiences and frustrations with operating system upgrades and aging hardware, spanning the better part of 3 decades.

              I agree 100% that Microsoft screws up upgrades more often than they should.  It does sounds like they’re making some changes to slow the pace down and allow people to stay on older versions for a longer.  We’ll see how that goes.

              But I flatly reject the notion that the current circumstances with Windows 10 is somehow uniquely bad, or that Microsoft is a horrible monster for not supporting people’s older hardware, perfectly, forever.  They put in more effort than most.

               

              3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #930836 Reply

      anonymous

      There seems to be a change where in ‘olden times’ windows would just do its thing and have unsupported devices in device manager. Now with the regular OS overhaul, Windows needs to have it functioning to install, the reason many are stuck on 1803 or earlier, seen with the 42% hang.

      This seems here to have advanced to drive mapping, with Windows expectations not matching reality.

    • #935596 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      The question is if it is a good thing or not.

      7GB is a huge wasted space out of the free space on laptops that come only with 128GB SSD + HD.
      Windows 10 OS + apps take ~50GB, the OEM takes a partition to restore to original laptop state..and than you update to a new Windows 10 version and get a 30GB Windows.old….

    • #939674 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      7GB is a huge wasted space out of the free space on laptops that come only with 128GB SSD + HD. Windows 10 OS + apps take ~50GB, the OEM takes a partition to restore to original laptop state..and than you update to a new Windows 10 version and get a 30GB Windows.old….

      What I was trying to suggest is that, now that SSDs have come way down in price, we’re going to see more storage in entry-level laptops going forward.

      These price adjustments are literally just a few months old.  The large computer manufacturers are typically locked in on lengthy contracts with ADATA, PNY, Samsung and the like…. so they won’t be able to get the cheaper drives into laptops for a little while longer.

      Again — just so we’re really clear about price points:  240GB SSDs are now $30.

      If you really need 50+ GB for Windows + applications, you should be able to find that much money to support your use case.

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by
         warrenrumak.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1015140 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        It’s cheaper for storage than it has ever been, but 32GB will still be cheaper than 128GB or 256GB in any case.  My guess is that we will still see these things pushed out with the absolute minimal hardware specs, going as low as humanly possible in price rather than keeping the same price point and giving customers more for the money.  Of course, better machines will be available too, but people shopping on price will continue to get devices short on storage, I think.  They appear to be nothing more than Chromebooks with a standard PC UEFI rather than the customized one that Chromebooks use.

        These kinds of machines often have eMMC storage and no upgrade path; there is no internal 2.5″ or M.2 place for a SSD… just the soldered-on eMMC and maybe an external SD/MicroSD slot (probably at USB 2 speed on a low end machine as such).  I have one such machine, my Dell Inspiron 11-3162, but I bought it knowing its limitations.  I just wanted a cheap laptop that has long battery life and that I could just grab and go… little did I know that only a few months later, I’d see the Acer Swift on sale for a hundred dollars off, on closeout… far better than the little Dell (Swift has quad core, IPS display at 1920×1080, 64GB eMMC + an empty internal M.2 slot, all aluminum case), which rendered the little Dell redundant before it was even a year old.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.5 & Kubuntu 18.04).

    • #939915 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      7GB is a huge wasted space out of the free space on laptops that come only with 128GB SSD + HD. Windows 10 OS + apps take ~50GB, the OEM takes a partition to restore to original laptop state..and than you update to a new Windows 10 version and get a 30GB Windows.old….

      What I was trying to suggest is that, now that SSDs have come way down in price, we’re going to see more storage in entry-level laptops going forward.

      These price adjustments are literally just a few months old. The large computer manufacturers are typically locked in on lengthy contracts with ADATA, PNY, Samsung and the like…. so they won’t be able to get the cheaper drives into laptops for a little while longer.

      Again — just so we’re really clear about price points: 240GB SSDs are now $30.

      If you really need 50+ GB for Windows + applications, you should be able to find that much money to support your use case.

      I know how to upgrade my M.2 256GB NVMe SSD to 512GB if needed, but most home users have no clue and will be blocked from updating due to lack of space.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #951449 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody_MVP

      FYI, the article had been revised, it now affect any Windows 10 > 1903 generally, not just 1809/1803
      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4500988/windows-update-blocked-because-of-drive-reassignment

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #952359 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        I still have a problem with this line:

        Note The drive reassignment is not limited to removable drives. Internal hard drives can also be affected.

        I understand that MS is blocking the 1903 upgrade on PCs with plugged in USB or SD storage. But how they can tell in advance – and block – based on the PC having an internal hard drive?

        • #952705 Reply

          jabeattyauditor
          AskWoody Lounger

          I still have a problem with this line:  The drive reassignment is not limited to removable drives. Internal hard drives can also be affected. I understand that MS is blocking the 1903 upgrade on PCs with plugged in USB or SD storage. But how they can tell in advance – and block – based on the PC having an internal hard drive?

          Woody, here’s my interpretation of the document:

          – If you have a USB drive or SD storage, you’ll experience this issue.

          – If you experience this issue, drive letter reassignment won’t be limited to just the storage that caused the issue; drive letters for internal disks may also be reassigned.

          4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1098475 Reply

        abbodi86
        AskWoody_MVP

        https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4500988/windows-update-blocked-for-windows-10-insider-program

        The article is slightly modified again, to mention that it only apply to Windows Insider users for now
        you know, since 1903 is not generally public yet 😉

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        b
    • #954475 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Plus

      – If you have a USB drive or SD storage, you’ll experience this issue.

      … potentially, not definitely. I have an SD card permanently inserted and drive letters were assigned appropriately when I upgraded to 1903 on April 8th. So it appears to be “may”, not “will”.

      Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker Saluted blockhead "Unwashed mass" (Group ASAP) Win10 v.1903

      2 users thanked author for this post.

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