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  • Win10 version 2004 deferrals gone from the user interface – but there’s a little-known Registry key that’ll keep new versions off your machine

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Win10 version 2004 deferrals gone from the user interface – but there’s a little-known Registry key that’ll keep new versions off your machine

    • This topic has 72 replies, 21 voices, and was last updated 59 minutes ago.
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      • #2275414 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        This one’s a gem. As you can see in the next two blog posts, Microsoft has officially taken away the “defer quality updates” and “defer feature update
        [See the full post at: Win10 version 2004 deferrals gone from the user interface – but there’s a little-known Registry key that’ll keep new versions off your machine]

        9 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2275426 Reply
        John
        AskWoody Lounger

        Microsoft takes away a really useful tool for many. 7 days is hardly much of a delay, would have accepted something like a 90 day max that could allow for Microsoft to fix most bugs. 7 days is hardly time to fix anything before a pushed upgrade.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2275433 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          See AKB2000016: Guide for Windows Update Settings fo Win10 in addition to the solution in Woody’s Blog Post.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2287134 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            UPDATE: Information has been added 8/6/2020 to AKB2000016 concerning the Target Release Version settings and how to set them.

        • #2275483 Reply
          John
          AskWoody Lounger

          I looked on the one PC that has 2004 Pro on it and I guess you can delay up to 35 days but its a one time shot then you must install the upgrade. So I guess if you plan on delaying pick the longest time possible.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by John. Reason: Proper grammer
          • #2275486 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            You must not have read AKB200016. Section 5 explains how to control Windows Update in Win10 Pro v2004. (Section 4 is for Pro v1909 and earlier)

            2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2275505 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Why is editing the registry preferred over using gpedit to set <\Windows Components\Windows Update\Windows Update for Business\Select the target Feature Update version>?

        I find it easy to remind myself of what I’ve changed with gpedit by clicking on All Settings and then sorting the State column.  It doesn’t take long at all for me to lose track of manual registry changes.

        How about Home users?  If they manually edit the registry, do these changes work for them?

        • #2275508 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Group Policy and its settings are not available to Users of Win10 Home.

          • #2275526 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            Yeah, thanks, I get that.  So does manually editing the registry give Home users the desired functionality, or not?

            • #2275532 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              I do not own any Win10 Home Editions. All mine are Pro. I can only make educated guesses here.

              People have tried to install Group Policy (or something like it) on the Home Edition. It is my understanding, from what I’ve read, that it does not work as intended. I have not tried this.

              I suggest you read through AKB2000016 for information on this next supposition.
              There are two different locations in the Registry (that I am familiar with) that concern Windows Update settings: one for Group Policy settings and one for GUI settings. It is my guess that the ones representing GP settings would be ineffective in Home Edition. Whether the settings that are associated with the GUI would work, I cannot say. I have no way to test them.

            • #2276139 Reply
              NetDef
              AskWoody_MVP

              does manually editing the registry give Home users the desired functionality, or not?

               

              According to official sources, no.  These reg settings are ignored on Windows 10 Home editions.

              ~ Group "Weekend" ~

              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2275538 Reply
        KP
        AskWoody Plus

        I think this is a gem too and like it a lot.

        I can disable upgrading with TargetReleaseVersion set to zero.

        With TargetReleaseVersion set to 1, and TargetReleaseVersionInfo set to 1903, 1909 or 2004, I can upgrade. (On a slow Internet connection, I prefer upgrading via ISO file.)

        I have it set, so will have to see how it affects the PC. My test is TargetReleaseVersion set to zero and TargetReleaseVersionInfo set to 1809.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2275577 Reply
        RetiredGeek
        AskWoody MVP

        Hey Y’all,

        Here’s a PowerShell program that will create the entries for the version where you want to lock. It will also remove them.

        2275578: Set-LockWinVersion
        .zip MD5 Hash: 180959D5855C09F535E8ECF10AE43BF3
        .ps1 MD5 Hash: 9B9346939458BF8C464310E80BA73C6F

        To see the help file from within Powershell:

        PS> Get-help [d:path]set-lockwinversion.ps1 -full
        

        or you can just edit the file with Notepad or Notepad++

        HTH 😎

        May the Forces of good computing be with you!

        RG

        PowerShell & VBA Rule!
        Computer Specs

        Attachments:
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2279574 Reply
          DriftyDonN
          AskWoody Plus

          I applied this script to win10 pro a couple of weeks ago and my pc has been acting ….different. I don’t know how to explain but I would like to reverse the process. I was on the april patch at that time as the may offering did odd things- mostly just all stop , esp if I pulled the power cord to go to battery power…it would stay on for about 45 seconds then blank. Also, when put to sleep mode, after various amounts of time, would either wake up (lid down and all lights on solid, not a blinking one to indicate sleep mode) or it would just stop. Windows doesnt seem to like to just shut down if not in an orderly manner. So I used the pre may image I had and all was well.  I applied the june patch 3 days ago and before things go on too much longer, I would like to remove the registry entries this script added but will the fact I have a newer build have any effect on the reversal? Over my head but I do have images!!! I do have the original zip file w/ the ps1 file….seems I saw it would /could also reverse the process? perhaps there is an easier way? I am not adverse to instructions re: regedit if available? I’m out on a limb here I think….

          Thank you

          Don

          PS FWIW, I intend to fend off ver 2004 as long as possible.

          "Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare."

          • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by DriftyDonN.
          • #2279590 Reply
            tonyc035
            AskWoody Plus

            If you have Win 10 pro, then you are probably better off using GPEdit to set (and remove) these values, rather than the script.  See other posts in this thread since many folks have tested and used this script and it may not be the culprit for your shutdown/sleep issues.

          • #2279786 Reply
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            Those settings won’t affect Windows other than preventing updates.
            Your issues are elsewhere and I suggest you start a new thread so we can chase them down.

            cheers, Paul

          • #2279867 Reply
            RetiredGeek
            AskWoody MVP

            DD,

            Just rerun the program with the -Remove parameter, e.g.,

            [d:\path\]Set-LockWinVersion.ps1 -Remove

            Remember you can get help on the program by:

            Get-Help [d:\path\]Set-LockWinVersion.ps1 -full

            I can’t think of any reason setting this parameter would cause your machine to “act funny” but with Windows who knows!

            HTH 😎

            May the Forces of good computing be with you!

            RG

            PowerShell & VBA Rule!
            Computer Specs

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2279885 Reply
          geekdom
          AskWoody Plus

          The link for Set-LockWinVersion yields:
          403 Forbidden
          nginx

          Please check the link or access rights.

          G{ot backup} TestBeta
          offline▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
          online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox80.0b4 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
      • #2275629 Reply
        Cee Arr
        AskWoody Plus

        At the time this post was put up I was about to upgrade from Windows 10 Home to Pro for precisely the two features that MS in their infinite wisdom (sic) have now removed.  I admire PKCano for the hard work and detailed information re updating the numerous versions of Windows, however MS have again moved the goal posts to their benefit – not for  the poor average user (in my case elderly).  I am sure MS read Woody’s site and whatever information is displayed re controlling updating MS is sure to block it.  So in essence why spend good money to get Windows 10 Pro when all I get is a 35 day deferral on updates?  I have that already with Home edition.  Furthermore I have no inclination to go delving into the Registry when MS can come in and change whatever/whenever.  I could be convinced other wise and am open to any suggestions.  Thanks Woody and Co. I do appreciate your efforts.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2275805 Reply
          KP
          AskWoody Plus

          Furthermore I have no inclination to go delving into the Registry when MS can come in and change whatever/whenever. I could be convinced other wise and am open to any suggestions.

          Yes, I can understand there is some hesitation however the registry is like expanding a folder’s tree. Navigate down then create one DWord item and one String value. My guess is I learned it from a previous article or preceding publication of AskWoody. The DWord will show up as REG_DWORD (TargetReleaseVersion) and will be a value 0 (zero) or 1 (one). The String will show up as REG_SZ (TargetReleaseVersionInfo) and you insert the OS version you want to stay on like 1909. In regedit, navigate down to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate then add the objects.

          It will require administrative privileges account.
          You could run a backup (too much work), I just create a System Restore point (Start -> Control Panel -> System -> System Protection -> Create -> give a meaningful unique name.
          Trying to think through the possible problems; System Restore needs to be turned on for the drive where the OS is on, usually C: drive.

          Right-click when you get down to WindowsUpdate and add a DWord (right-click Add DWord) and a String (right-click Add String). Right click on the DWord to Rename it to TargetReleaseVersion. Right-click TargetReleaseVersion to Modify it to 0 or 1. Right click on the String to Rename it to TargetReleaseVersionInfo. Right-click TargetReleaseVersionInfo to Modify it to 1909 or another value.

          Go slow and stop if you are not sure. If you get stuck, it might be good to start a new topic to help you.
          I am trying not to miss anything, and hope I put enough here so you will give it a try. There seems to be enough knowledgeable people here, someone will help you.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by KP.
          4 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2275860 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            Restore points in my experience are just not reliable in win10. I have not gotten one to restore to completion. So I would advise making an image of your disk. You will then have everything ypu may need to restore if things go wonky on you. Macrium Reflect is free(or you can pay for the shiny one) but there are others that are probably just as good.

            BTW, learning to image your disk and doing it on a regular basis(daily for heavy use, weekly if not so heavy etc. Keep at least 3 separate copies on external devices(USB SSD’s are inexpensive(relatively)) Also keep at least the last 3 to 5 images you make- you never know when win10 gremlins will jump out and bite you and then steal all your cookies too! Good Luck!!

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2275652 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        So in essence why spend good money to get Windows 10 Pro when all I get is a 35 day deferral on updates?

        You don’t have to dive into the registry. In Pro you have GPEdit which is a lot easier to set with deferrals of up to 365 days…

        You can get a Pro license for $9.95 or $39.99. Pick your choice.

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
      • #2275660 Reply
        Carl D
        AskWoody Lounger

        So, when the 365 day deferral for Windows 10 Professional “disappeared” in 1909 (or was it as early as 1903?) and then returned after expressions of dissatisfaction from users was that another “aw, shucks. Sorry about that” moment by MS or were they ‘testing it’ to see what sort of reaction they were going to get? (I’ll go with the second one).

        Looks to me like they’ve decided to have another go at it with 2004 to again see what sort of backlash there is from Professional users. Seems like the “plan” is to slowly wear users down until they just give in and accept what MS is doing (or move to another operating system altogether). Kinda like slowly boiling a frog in water to use an old expression.

        I wonder – when Windows 10 Professional finally ends up being exactly the same as Windows 10 Home in regards to options, etc. will the price of Professional drop so it is the same as the price for Home or will it be the other way around? (once again, I’ll go with the second one).

        Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 2004 64bit.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2276220 Reply
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          So in essence why spend good money to get Windows 10 Pro when all I get is a 35 day deferral on updates?

          Microsoft comparsion

          Apart from being able to set Group Policy, there are few more crucial things you want to be able to do, I used these features, that are not included in Home:
          Bitlocker, Assigned access and Kiosk mode setup.
          Maybe some users dont need it, just look at the webpage to see if you need it.

          Also I think, that I saw some posts, that Home edition has ads on its lockscreen. Dunno if this still remains, I never use Home.

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      • #2275698 Reply
        lmacri
        AskWoody Plus

        So, when the 365 day deferral for Windows 10 Professional “disappeared” in 1909 (or was it as early as 1903?) and then returned after expressions of dissatisfaction from users was that another “aw, shucks. Sorry about that” moment by MS…

        Hi Carl D:

        The same thought crossed my mind. A similar issue occurred when Win 10 Pro v1903 was released – see Martin Brinkmann’s ghacks.net 28-May-2019  Windows 10 1903: the case of the missing update deferral options. After several months of user complaints Microsoft quietly relented and fixed this issue per Woody’s 07-Nov-2019 Looks like Win10 version 1903 will get a fix for the Windows Update “disappearing deferral dialog” bug.

        I’m getting really tired of these stupid hide-and-seek games Microsoft plays with my Win 10 Pro Windows Update settings, and the new “Download and Install Now” option in the Windows Update settings isn’t an acceptable alternative. I’ll defer my v2004 feature update for as long as possible, and then I guess it’s back to monthly edits in the Group Policy Editor (e.g., Computer Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Update | Windows Update for Business | Select when Quality Updates are received; 35 days = deferred, 0 = okay to deliver) to control when my monthly security updates are delivered. Hopefully Microsoft will eventually reverse this terrible decision (again) and return the deferral settings to the Windows Update advanced options, because it doesn’t look like they’re ever going improve their QA testing and stop pushing out buggy updates.
        ————-
        64-bit Win 10 Pro v1909 build 18363.836 * Windows Defender v4.18.2005.5

        6 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2276221 Reply
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          I wonder, if “oustanding updates” in this official flowchart (top left corner) means “updates are amazing” or “updates are pending” 🙂
          Sorry for little offtopic, but I wanted to share.

          windows-automatic-update-flowchart

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

          Attachments:
          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2275705 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        The registry key has been set to 1909.

        I have two flash drives with ISO 1909 and ISO 2004 respectively. At some undefined point in the future when 2004 is deemed safer, I will install the new version from ISO 2004. In the meantime, if there are difficulties with 1909, I will use ISO 1909 for repair.

        Both versions sit on separate flash drives in a desk drawer for easy accessibility.

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox80.0b4 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
      • #2275744 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        So, when the 365 day deferral for Windows 10 Professional “disappeared” in 1909 (or was it as early as 1903?)

        You can lock 1909 indefinitely by a small registry trick if you are on 1909 Pro, Edu..

        https://www.computerworld.com/article/3564158/microsoft-nixes-update-deferral-settings-but-gives-us-a-targetreleaseversioninfo.html

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2275771 Reply
        lmacri
        AskWoody Plus

        You can lock 1909 indefinitely by a small registry trick if you are on 1909 Pro, Edu.. https://www.computerworld.com/article/3564158/microsoft-nixes-update-deferral-settings-but-gives-us-a-targetreleaseversioninfo.html%5B/quote%5D

        … which is fine unless someone forgets to change TargetReleaseVersionInfo to a value of “2004” in the registry before Win 10 Home and Pro v1909 reach their 18-month end-of-service on 11-May-2021. I have Win 10 Pro so I still have the option of delaying my feature (Version) updates for up to 365 days in the Group Policy Editor (Computer Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Update | Windows Update for Business | Select When Preview Builds and Feature Updates Are Received) once v2004 is delivered to my system.

        Carl D and I were only reminding folks that Microsoft previously removed these deferral settings from the Win 10 Pro v1903 Windows Update settings and then quietly restored them after widespread complaints from users. Fingers crossed they’re still willing to listen to user feedback.
        ————-
        64-bit Win 10 Pro v1909 build 18363.836 * Windows Defender v4.18.2005.5

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2275788 Reply
        KP
        AskWoody Plus

        I thought I would experiment a bit on 1809 32-bit Home.

        The Ed Braiter article indicates it will not work on the Windows 10 Home.

        But I used regedit (System Restore point created for backup), put in TargetReleaseVersion = 0 and TargetReleaseVersionInfo = 1809.

        I tried WUShowHide and WindowsUpdateMiniTool, both seem to work fine showing Windows Updates. First two hours, so far no ill effects.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2275837 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I did a number of tests with a vm and my collection of old win10 iso files.  This feature worked on everything I tried, from 1803 through 1907, on win10 pro and win10 home alike.  The group policy seems to have appeared with win10 pro 1903.  I speculate that this feature isn’t baked into the code on the win10 iso files, but rather it’s handled by windows update, which updates itself every time it’s invoked.  So it could well work with every win10 release out there.  By the same token, it could all stop working if the powers that be have a change of mind.  But for now, it’s very useful, especially for win10 home users, so fingers crossed.

        Props to @abbodi86 for digging it up.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2275907 Reply
        Tom
        AskWoody Plus

        I use group policy (as described by Woody) to defer updates but want to add these registry entries as well (belts and braces approach). I have a problem gaining permission to create the registry values. I always get the message “permission denied” when I use either regedit (run as administrator) or power shell (run as administrator)  and  am unable to write to the registry. My account is an administrator account which was brought forward to my recent upgrade from Win7 to Win10 and is the only account on my PC.

        • #2276202 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          I always get the message “permission denied”

          What keys are you trying to edit that give this error?
          Can you edit any values at all?

          cheers, Paul

          • #2276809 Reply
            Tom
            AskWoody Plus

            HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate

            I’m trying to set the TargetReleaseVersion. Win10 Pro, 1903. I use a Windows user signin and I’m an administrator.

            • #2276813 Reply
              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              Check the permissions – right click on the key and select Permissions.
              On my box Administrators have Full Control and Read set on HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies and inherited below this.

              cheers, Paul

          • #2276811 Reply
            Tom
            AskWoody Plus

            I can edit most keys, I develop software and this is my test machine. The software with my credentials can create keys and entries in HKLM and can create Public/Private Key Stores.

            • #2276830 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              See #2276103 – You can use Group Policy to set the keys for you.

            • #2277078 Reply
              anonymous
              Guest

              On mine too. Is there a trick to running regedit as an admin? (rather than just clicking yes to the run as admin prompt).

              • #2280212 Reply
                Coldheart9020
                AskWoody Lounger

                You can hold Ctrl+Shift as you hit return after typing regedit either in the Start menu or in the Run prompt (Windows key+R). Not a trick as such but I find it quicker than using the mouse. 🙂

      • #2275937 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        … which is fine unless someone forgets to change TargetReleaseVersionInfo to a value of “2004” in the registry before Win 10 Home and Pro v1909 reach their 18-month end-of-service on 11-May-2021.

        Why should users change to ‘2004’ if they want to stay on ‘1809, 1903, 1909..) ?
        With this ‘hack’, until Microsoft changed that, Microsoft will be blocked from force upgrading even after EOL date.

        • #2275944 Reply
          tomkrieg
          Guest

          Forgot to mention. Win 10 Pro 1903 without the June updates. (I thing I was upgraded to May when I converted from Win7 Pro to 1903 Pro).

        • #2276058 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Woody said, “Microsoft says it’ll work “until the current OS version reaches end of service…”

      • #2276031 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I found out creating a file called “$WINDOWS.~BT” in the root of the C drive can be used to block feature updates indefinitely. Windows Update fails with error 0x800700b7 because it tries to create a folder with the same name.

        Caveats:

        It will not block feature updates like 1903 -> 1909 which are not full upgrades.
        It will break manual upgrades with Media Creation Tool and Update Assistant.

        Once you want to upgrade just delete the file.

        This works even in Windows 10 Home where Windows Update related group policy settings are ignored.

        • #2276098 Reply
          NetDef
          AskWoody_MVP

          This works but you need an additional step:

          You need to edit the folder security permissions.  Remove all permissions for all system and other accounts, and make yourself the owner.

          ~ Group "Weekend" ~

      • #2276094 Reply
        KP
        AskWoody Plus

        I am re-considering using regedit. It is probably easier to follow Woody’s line commands as mentioned in his article.

        I used the Command Prompt (Admin) to run. As I experimented, I see you can modify the value by re-running the line with a different data value.

      • #2276099 Reply
        KP
        AskWoody Plus

        I did see, Windows 10 likes to turn off System Restore. So maybe it is not as reliable.

        Another way to backup the registry is to export it. The way I think it works is, you click on the highest level from which you want to export out the registry, then export. When you want to restore those values, run the exported file. (Some people might not like this because they have to be in regedit to export.)

      • #2276103 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        It would seem you all are doing things the hard way, at least for Pro, Edu and Ent. (Home doesn’t have a choice – if the value really works for them).
        Update: Thanks @James-Bond-007 ‘s post #2276896.

        In Group Policy, under Windows Update for Business:
        If you make this setting

        Group-Policy

        It automatically  creates these Registry values:

        Registry

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by PKCano.
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        • #2276112 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          By Jove, I think you’ve found it.

          (I think that’s the setting MS was alluding to in its original documentation.)

        • #2276138 Reply
          NetDef
          AskWoody_MVP

          If using GP on a corporate AD network, these settings may not be visible until one downloads and installs the latest Group Policy Administrative Templates on the domain controllers.

          https://support.microsoft.com/en-in/help/3087759/how-to-create-and-manage-the-central-store-for-group-policy-administra

           

          Stand alone machines or workstations on a peer to peer network do NOT need the above . . .

          ~ Group "Weekend" ~

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2276855 Reply
          James Bond 007
          AskWoody Lounger

          PKCano,

          The Group Policy setting you have indicated is only available on Windows 10 2004 at this time. I checked my Windows 10 1803 / 1809 / 1909 VMware virtual machines and none of them have this setting.

          I think this should be made clear if it hasn’t been already.

          For computers running Windows 10 1803 to 1909 (as stated by Woody in his article), if you want to take advantage of this you will need to edit the Registry directly to add the required keys.

          Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2276862 Reply
            lmacri
            AskWoody Plus

            From my Win 10 Pro v1909 Build 18363.836 Group Policy Editor [Computer Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Update | Windows Update for Business]:

            Win-10-Pro-v1909-Group-Policy-Editor-Windows-Update-Target-Feature-Update-01-Jul-2020

            Attachments:
            2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2276868 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            Nope, the setting is alive and well in my v1909 Pro Group Policy too, under Windows Update for Business.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2276874 Reply
              James Bond 007
              AskWoody Lounger

              I will repeat, that the setting does NOT exist in my Windows 1909 (18363.418) VMware virtual machine (and not in 1803 / 1809 either).

              So, any explanation as to why? Is it because my 1909 virtual machine has no updates installed yet? If so, that shows 1909 initially does NOT have this setting, and that brings the question : what update needs to be installed for that setting to be available?

              And how about earlier versions 1803 / 1809 / 1903?

              Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

              • #2276882 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                Mine is up to date June patches (I test early). Try May patches. Don’t know when MS added it, but they did.

        • #2276896 Reply
          James Bond 007
          AskWoody Lounger

          (1) Confirmed : After installing KB4556799, which brings Windows 10 1909 up to build 18363.836, the Group Policy setting indicated is now available to use.

          It is quite likely that installing the same update to 1903 would also make the same Group Policy setting available.

          (2) After installing KB4551853, which brings Windows 10 1809 up to build 17763.1217, the Group Policy setting indicated is now available to use.

          (3) After installing KB4556807, which brings Windows 10 1803 Enterprise / Education up to build 17134.1488 (Windows 10 1803 Pro reached end of service in November 2019 so this update cannot be installed there.), the Group Policy setting indicated is now available to use.

          So Microsoft added the setting in the May 2020 update (or earlier) to 1909 (most probably also 1903), 1809 and 1803.

          Unfortunately I cannot modify my original post at this point, so here is the corrected statement :

          The original versions of Windows 10 1803 / 1809 / 1909 (and most likely 1903) does NOT have this Group Policy setting, but after installing the May 2020 update to the systems, the Group Policy setting indicated will be available to use.

          Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by James Bond 007. Reason: Addition
          • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by James Bond 007. Reason: Correction
          5 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2276968 Reply
            Alex5723
            AskWoody Plus

            Before adding the Group Policy for Business Windows 10 Pro had Semi-Annual Channel (SAC) and Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted). These were deleted from Windows Update GUI settings and replaced with the GPedit for Business.

            • #2276974 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              SemiAnnualChannel still exists as a setting in Group Policy\Windows Update for Business, under Feature Deferrals and Preview Builds, and allows you to specify a number of days for Feature Deferral.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2276888 Reply
        RetiredGeek
        AskWoody MVP

        Hey Y’all,

        I found this interesting, I set the registry entries per my previous posted PowerShell program.

        TargetReleaseVersion-Regedit

        Being on Pro I decided to check Group Policy and got this:

        TargetReleaseVersion-GPEdit

        You would think Group Policy would recognize that the values are set?

        So I used the program to remove them and then used GPedit to set them again and yep GPedit set the same values! So next I used the program to remove them again and fired GPedit up again and it still thinks that policy is enabled? Looks like some serious smoke and mirrors going on here.

        HTH 😎

        May the Forces of good computing be with you!

        RG

        PowerShell & VBA Rule!
        Computer Specs

        Attachments:
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2276892 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          You rebooted in between each of those changes?

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2276985 Reply
            RetiredGeek
            AskWoody MVP

            PK,

            No I didn’t. I did close & reopen GPedit though. I just restarted my machine from shutdown, left the house, and GPedit still shows Not Configured but the entries are in the registry.

            HTH 😎

            May the Forces of good computing be with you!

            RG

            PowerShell & VBA Rule!
            Computer Specs

        • #2276920 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Group Policy controls the registry. The registry does not control Group policy.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2276988 Reply
            RetiredGeek
            AskWoody MVP

            Anon,

            Maybe it’s just me, but when you have a Database (the Registry) and a User Interface to the database (GPedit) it would make sense that the UI would read the Database every time it is started. But then I don’t work for Microsoft! LOL

            HTH 😎

            May the Forces of good computing be with you!

            RG

            PowerShell & VBA Rule!
            Computer Specs

            • #2277214 Reply
              NetDef
              AskWoody_MVP

              Well . . . not quite.  Group Policy actually has it’s own database store.

              https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/openspecs/windows_protocols/ms-gpod/351cf7ff-d4d8-4e80-b5dc-6a51a328c6c4

              What’s supposed to happen is GP checks the policy database during a reboot and applies settings indicated by that database to the local registry as needed.

              In theory, if you set the setting in GP, then reboot, you should see the registry settings adopt those settings.  If you clear the registry settings, without changing GP, then reboot again – you should see the changes re-applied for you.

              However, there is also a scheduler at work here, and sometimes a reboot misses . . . until later.  You can force a GP update at a CMD line with the command “gpupdate” when this happens.

              You can also get a summary of all the GP enforced rules with the powershell command “Get-GPOReport”

              https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/grouppolicy/get-gporeport?view=win10-ps

              Cheers!

              ~ Group "Weekend" ~

              2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2277475 Reply
                RetiredGeek
                AskWoody MVP

                FYI:

                GroupPolicy

                This topic contains the brief descriptions of the Windows PowerShell cmdlets that are for use in administering Group Policy in Windows Server and Windows client with Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT) installed. (RSAT includes the GPMC and the Group Policy cmdlets.)

                So unless you have RSAT installed you can’t do this. I tried to install the GroupPolicy module w/o success.

                
                PS> Import-Module grouppolicy
                Import-Module : The specified module 'grouppolicy' was not loaded because no valid module file was found in any module directory.
                At line:1 char:1
                + Import-Module grouppolicy
                + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    + CategoryInfo          : ResourceUnavailable: (grouppolicy:String) [Import-Module], FileNotFoundException
                    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : Modules_ModuleNotFound,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.ImportModuleCommand
                 
                
                PS> install-module grouppolicy
                PackageManagement\Install-Package : No match was found for the specified search criteria and module name 'grouppolicy'. Try 
                Get-PSRepository to see all available registered module repositories.
                At C:\Program Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules\PowerShellGet\1.0.0.1\PSModule.psm1:1809 char:21
                + ...          $null = PackageManagement\Install-Package @PSBoundParameters
                +                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    + CategoryInfo          : ObjectNotFound: (Microsoft.Power....InstallPackage:InstallPackage) [Install-Package], Exception
                    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : NoMatchFoundForCriteria,Microsoft.PowerShell.PackageManagement.Cmdlets.InstallPackage
                

                HTH 😎

                May the Forces of good computing be with you!

                RG

                PowerShell & VBA Rule!
                Computer Specs

              • #2277478 Reply
                geekdom
                AskWoody Plus

                @RetiredGeek

                Could you build a PowerShell toggle switch that installs and uninstalls MicrosoftStore?

                G{ot backup} TestBeta
                offline▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
                online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox80.0b4 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
            • #2277243 Reply
              NetDef
              AskWoody_MVP

              Addendum: Think of Group Policy as a “Template” (and Microsoft actually does use that word.)

              It may be applied from an authoritative source depending on your system.

              1. at the local only level for a workstation for all users and the system (gpedit.msc)
              2. at the network level for all workstations in an admin specified group – for all users or all machines (Active Directory Group Policy Objects which are published on a central share called SYSVOL or SYSVOL_DFSR on newer servers.)

              As a template, it overrides user and system settings based on decisions for behavior and security as defined by the administrator.

              It never reads from the system or user registry hives, instead it defines settings in the registry (among other things.)

              Users and local admins can change the registry, but if that change is in conflict with settings defined in the Group Policy Template, GP will win.

              Eventually . . .

              GP checks and applies all the defined settings on a reboot and on a randomized schedule that by default ranges from 1 minute to 90 minutes (this setting can also be changed by the super admin.)

              ~ Group "Weekend" ~

              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2277413 Reply
        MikeyD215
        AskWoody Plus

        I have used the Power Shell option to hang onto 1903 and verified with Reg Edit that it installed. (I also downloaded and installed the Chredge blocker, incidentally.)

        Now here is my question, am I correct in concluding that this “target version” reg will not prevent anyone from manually updating to a later version, at will?

        Inasmuch as a manual update (from ISO, say) will not have arrived through Windows Update, it seems this technique should not prevent a newer version from installing, which provides a way to update prior to the expiration date. Does it make sense or not? (Yeah, I know, Softies don’t always make sense.) One could then use reg edit to change the version number entry to lock in the newer version until whenever.

        Grateful to read your opinions.

      • #2277421 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I correct in concluding that this “target version” reg will not prevent anyone from manually updating to a later version, at will?

        You are correct. Manual install using ISO will disregard any reg/GPedit/deferal.. settings.

      • #2277514 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        @RetiredGeek

        Could you build a PowerShell toggle switch that installs and uninstalls MicrosoftStore?

        As I remember reading, once Microsoft Store is uninstalled, there is no way to reinstall except by reinstalling Windows 10.

        • #2277537 Reply
          geekdom
          AskWoody Plus

          PowerShell commands allow for uninstalling and reinstalling of built-in apps.

          G{ot backup} TestBeta
          offline▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
          online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox80.0b4 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
          • This reply was modified 1 month ago by geekdom.
          • #2277547 Reply
            Alex5723
            AskWoody Plus

            PowerShell commands allow for uninstalling and reinstalling of built-in apps.

            • This reply was modified 1 month ago by geekdom.

            I think that Microsoft Store is the exception.

            • #2277556 Reply
              cyberSAR
              AskWoody Plus

              Had to reinstall the store on a machine yesterday when it went wonky. Nothing worked but the PS command did.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2277550 Reply
            geekdom
            AskWoody Plus

            Including Store.

            G{ot backup} TestBeta
            offline▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
            online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox80.0b4 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
      • #2277552 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        PowerShell commands allow for uninstalling and reinstalling of built-in apps including the Microsoft Store.

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox80.0b4 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
      • #2280196 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        If you have Win 10 pro, then you are probably better off using GPEdit to set (and remove) these values, rather than the script.  See other posts in this thread since many folks have tested and used this script and it may not be the culprit for your shutdown/sleep issues.

        I suspect there may be another culprit. No idea what. I use Nordvpn and when it came time to update(couple days ago) I got error. Nord responded and I discovered several missing directories and sub directories. Uninstalled, reinstalled all is well so another culprit it must be. NO idea.

        I think all is well, sfc \scannow yields no errors.

         

        "Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare."

      • #2280221 Reply
        sahalen
        AskWoody Plus

        OK, today I used the the two registry entries to keep my system from going to 2004:

        1. reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate /f /v TargetReleaseVersion /t REG_DWORD /d 1
        2. reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate /f /v TargetReleaseVersionInfo /t REG_SZ /d 1909

        After checking the registry and confirming the entries were there, I tried to run Windows Update. It wouldn’t run! It said it was checking for updates but kept timing out. Up to this point, I did not have any problems with WU. Interestingly, the Microsoft Store update was doing the same thing. After trying several things without success, I ran the “ResetWUEng.cmd” tool which Microsoft Tech Support suggested to run.  After completing using the tool and rebooting, both WU and MS Store update both worked again. I then checked the registry and both TargetReleaseVersion registry entries were gone. Since the WU reset tool did a number of things, I am not absolutely sure the problem was with the TargetReleaseVersion registry entries but I can say that WU and MS store updating were both working fine up to the point the registry entries were added. They were both working again after the entries were deleted. While I can reinsert and then remove the two TargetReleaseVersion registry entries to see if I can duplicate this situation, this is my only machine and I am not going to use it for experimentation so I’ll leave it alone.

        I would like to hear some thoughts on this.

        • #2280273 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          As you know it’s easily fixed, add the 2 entries and test.

          As always, make an image backup to an external disk regularly. You never know when it’s going to go pear shaped.

          cheers, Paul

          • #2280494 Reply
            sahalen
            AskWoody Plus

            Paul, I appreciate your reply. I did state your thought at the end of my post. Yes, I have multiple image backups. However, since everything is working now and my Windows version did not go to 2004 after updating last night, I am going to leave it well alone. I have been bitten in the past when experimenting with my machine. I may use the backup if the next update pushes my machine to 2004 without my approval and there are problems associated with the update.

            I am interested if anyone has had this same issue.

            Thanks, sahalen

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