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    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Windows 10

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      • #1873376
        sgt173
        AskWoody Lounger

        Help I have only had 7 Professional before. What should I do to get all the updates I need? I have not even turned on 10 yet. If you can help me I would really appreciate it.I have the home version of 10. I use Firefox

      • #1873378
        PKCano
        Manager

        Here are some instructions that might be helpful for a first-time startup.

        The important things are: to not connect to the Internet first, to set Metered connections when you do connect, to have wushowhide.diagcab on hand, to use a local account (as opposed to a Microsoft account), and to be sure your settings are done before you connect for the first time.

      • #1873489
        joep517
        AskWoody MVP

        My approach depends on the hardware and software configuration. If you are like the majority of users and do not have any special hardware or software then contrary to what appears to be the conventional wisdom here I recommend you connect to the internet, install any available updates, and not worry about the monthly updates. You may wish to use the new settings available to defer updates for a few days or a couple of weeks.

        By and large, I want to my machine and machines I support to be used as the operator intends and not spend time managing updates. IMO, changing settings and/or configurations to apply or avoid updates is a waste of time. In multiple decades over multiple configurations on multiple machines, I have only had less than a handful of problems with monthly updates and that was with .NET in the XP days.

        --Joe

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1873657
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          By and large, I want to my machine and machines I support to be used as the operator intends and not spend time managing updates.

          That’s precisely the point.  The operator often has different intent for his computer than Microsoft does, and now that Microsoft is no longer concerned about the operator’s intent for the PCs he owns, particularly when those users are using consumer editions of Windows, extraordinary measures are needed to regain the control that MS has usurped.  That control rightfully belongs exclusively to the owners of the hardware, regardless of what Microsoft may think.

          With no professional QA of which to speak, the task of testing Windows builds falls to “insiders,” when they aren’t talking about ninja cat memes and otherwise clowning around, and after that, to consumers.  While Microsoft may think that consumers are little more than cannon fodder who can take the bumps and bruises so that the enterprise customers don’t have to (which they’ve admitted is their strategy, not that there was really any doubt), Woody has often emphasized that consumers, who generally do not have IT departments on call who can repair a borked update, have to be more careful than enterprise customers, just the opposite of Microsoft’s plan to use them as unwilling beta testers.  The organizations operating the computers you maintain have you to call if something goes wrong, but most people don’t have someone like that.

          There’s generally very little benefit to being one of the first members of the computing public to get a given Microsoft patch.  Seldom is a security update so pressing that it absolutely has to be installed right this minute, and non-security updates are even less important.

          Microsoft’s strategy of using paying consumers as conscripted beta testers demonstrates the importance of having someone else try out the patches first, so why allow Microsoft to put you into the “conscript” group for someone else’s benefit, possibly to your own detriment?  You paid for Windows, so you might as well put yourself into the group that benefits from having someone else vet the patches first.  Even if that patching “usually” doesn’t end up causing harm, that doesn’t mean that it’s a good idea to be one of the individuals providing testing services for the corporate customers.

          There are a lot of risky behaviors that “usually” come out okay, but it doesn’t mean that they’re a good idea, or that the very next time someone attempts one of them, something bad will not happen.

           

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.20.5 User Edition)

          • #1873697
            joep517
            AskWoody MVP

            First, while you may think that your remark about memes and clowning around is cute I find it insulting to a very large segment of Insider users. There are many millions of people using and testing Insider Builds without discussing cats or clowning around. While almost all lack formal Q/A training they are still testing many aspects of Windows 10. Check the Feedback Hub if you are able.

            Microsoft may have disbanded their formal Q/A group but supposedly those people were distributed among the developers. At the same time, Microsoft has ramped up its data collection (aka telemetry) efforts. Personally, while I understand the reasoning in attempting to catch errors earlier in the development and release process I do not agree with disbanding the formal Q/A group. However, I am not in a position to know the real results. I doubt that anyone here knows for sure how good or bad the current Windows codebase is. We do not know the error rate per lines of code. We do not know for sure the even the gross number of bugs. We do not know who is reporting bugs. We do not know the number of systems affected but any bug. I can go on about what we don’t know. But, all we do know is that Microsoft claims each version of Windows is better than the prior version quality wise. They have numbers that they do not divulge. What we see here and in other support forums are lists of bugs but no supporting data about the extent, true seriousness, and in some cases almost no analysis of the problem.

            You and many others here appear to think that all patches from Microsoft are bad and should be avoided. From my experience, I do not agree. I do not receive support calls about Windows updates and upgrades. Not that I couldn’t. They just very seldom happen for Windows. Most calls are for hardware or third-party software issues. I do not object to a brief delay in installing updates. I do strongly object to not installing patches or being able to pick and choose patches to install. The pick and choose method is a big reason why we have what we have now. It leads to what are essentially many different versions of Windows being run. Cumulative fixes help in the long run by having most systems on the same codebase.

            You did NOT purchase Windows. You do have to remember that you paid for a license to use Windows of the terms of the license agreement. If you do not want to agree to the license then decline it and go to a different OS.

            I think it is riskier to have to remember to change settings and/or configuration to install patches or upgrades and then change back to block them again.

            --Joe

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #1873905
              Alex5723
              AskWoody Plus

              Microsoft claims each version of Windows is better than the prior version quality wise

              An false claim :

              Windows 7: 21 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 20 rated important
              Windows 8.1: 19 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 18 rated important
              Windows 10 version 1703: 24 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 23 important
              Windows 10 version 1709: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important
              Windows 10 version 1803: 37 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 36 important
              Windows 10 version 1809: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important
              Windows 10 version 1903: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important.

              Windows 10 has more security holes than Windows 7, Windows 8.1

              Windows 1903 from 5.2019 has more security holes as 2 years old Windows 1703 from 5.2017, while 1903 has the SAME security holes as 1709, 1803, 1809.

              There is nothing in Microsoft’s claim.

              • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Alex5723.
              • #1873929
                doriel
                AskWoody Lounger

                Exactly.. This picture below is like half year old. So newer builds are starting to catch up 🙂

                Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

                HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

                Attachments:
              • #1873941
                jabeattyauditor
                AskWoody Lounger

                Microsoft claims each version of Windows is better than the prior version quality wise

                An false claim :

                Windows 7: 21 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 20 rated important
                Windows 8.1: 19 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 18 rated important
                Windows 10 version 1703: 24 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 23 important
                Windows 10 version 1709: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important
                Windows 10 version 1803: 37 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 36 important
                Windows 10 version 1809: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important
                Windows 10 version 1903: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important.

                Windows 10 has more security holes than Windows 7, Windows 8.1

                Windows 1903 from 5.2019 has more security holes as 2 years old Windows 1703 from 5.2017, while 1903 has the SAME security holes as 1709, 1803, 1809.

                There is nothing in Microsoft’s claim.

                • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Alex5723.

                Identified & patched vulnerabilities <> total vulnerabilities

                Do you think Microsoft is putting as much energy into finding holes in Windows 7 as it is in finding holes in Windows 10?

              • #1874068
                joep517
                AskWoody MVP

                You keep using numbers of reported vulnerabilities as THE method to determine the relative safety of each OS. While your conclusion may be correct, I doubt it. What if half the bugs in Windows 10 are in features not present in older versions? What if those new features are security features intended to make your system safer? Sloppy coding? Maybe. Does that mean Windows 10 is less secure? Maybe but probably not.

                I’m saying we do not have enough information to determine relative safety based on a published list of the number of vulnerabilities fixed. And because we do not have enough information we can not come to an absolute decision.

                --Joe

      • #1873612
        sgt173
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thanks Joep517,
        All of my pro 7 are going out had them since 2007. I brought them back down here when I retired. I do miss the XP version back in the day. But we have to move on, This is for my wife so see can try it.
        I will continue to say on 7 and help her out.
        Sgt173

      • #1873627
        sgt173
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thanks PKCano,
        I with start off the net and do the settings for sure.
        SGT173

      • #2325118
        cmar6
        AskWoody Plus

        I recently read on the forum a recommendation for an online deep scan of one’s system if one susptects malware but don’t remember the site. Any recommendations?

        • #2325125
          anonymous
          Guest

          Do you happen to remember which anti-malware program/app the forum might have been talking about at the time? For example, was it Windows Defender, AVG, Avast, Malwarebytes or one of the others?

        • #2325129
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          A number of AV providers have an online scan – it actually requires a download to run – Panda and Kaspersky spring to mind.

          cheers, Paul

      • #2325136
        cmar6
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks, Paul and Guest. Do you have any preference between those two?

        The only thing I remember about the discussion of this online malware scanner is that it used 20 difference signature files to do a very thorough system scan.

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