• Windows 10X: Future fireworks or another dud?

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    • This topic has 17 replies, 14 voices, and was last updated 4 years ago.
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    #2170339

    WOODY’S WINDOWS WATCH By Woody Leonhard Last week, Microsoft took the wraps off its next, next, next version of Windows, the long-anticipated Windows
    [See the full post at: Windows 10X: Future fireworks or another dud?]

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    • #2170355

      Windows 10X will be a dud just like Windows RT, Windows 10 Mobile…

    • #2170390

      Ah, so that’s why they aren’t fixing this month’s patches.

      Windows has supported dual screens since at least XP.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2170418

      Windows has supported dual screens since at least XP.

      That’s quite true. But the Win10X UI has some specific elements — e.g., drag to double-screen — that aren’t in XP. I’m not yet sure if I like the new Start menu. Er, icons.

    • #2170449

      You missed an important indicator for the potential success for this new version of Windows. Containers is how Azure works and have been avail for several years now. It’s a stable proven technology that developers are going to welcome with open arms because they already have.  Security professionals also love containers for the obvious reason of containment.

      you’re right though old stuff won’t come along for this ride. We’ve reach another technology inflection point where you either go with the flow or get left in the legacy bin, er container.

      https://searchwindowsserver.techtarget.com/definition/Microsoft-Windows-Containers

       

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      • #2170457

        You missed an important indicator for the potential success for this new version of Windows. Containers is how Azure works and have been avail for several years now. It’s a stable proven technology that developers are going to welcome with open arms because they already have.  Security professionals also love containers for the obvious reason of containment.

        you’re right though old stuff won’t come along for this ride. We’ve reach another technology inflection point where you either go with the flow or get left in the legacy bin, er container.

        https://searchwindowsserver.techtarget.com/definition/Microsoft-Windows-Containers

         

        Thanks for your observation. I’m unwilling to trust Microsoft these days. But I like the encouragments you mentioned about Azure because:  one of my very clever team leaders is considering using it to help contain and design live, real-time databases for a an MMO crowdsourcing game my company is developing.

        • This reply was modified 4 years ago by Mr. Austin.
    • #2170456

      Woody, thanks very much for your very good site and its thoughtful tribe! This crowdsourced site and your newsletters are plesant oases amid deserts of sparse IT information, and even IT misinformation. You could extrapolate from my Ask Woody profile that I’ve crossed many IT deserts in search and support of excellent and reliable computer user experiences.

      I started using Windows on 3.x because I preferred not to work within DOS command lines. These days I see that Microsoft’s intentional, Windows 10 drunken sloppiness and their disingenuous obfuscations tell me that it’s time for me to think about looking into other, more reliable OSs which actually serve their users needs  —  rather than submitting to the highly destructive, socially autistic surveillance capitalisms which Microsoft now prefers.

      Virtual machines which sandbox Windows into RAM, along with great anti-telemetry software is the only environment in which I’m willing to run Windows. So why would I choose to accept that? I wouldn’t.

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    • #2170540

      Windows 10X – and all the other technologies leading up to it:  Isn’t it, in a general overview, just another attempt to disguise Windows original fatal flaw of “apps sharing support files with other apps’?  It appears that apps that are complete and isolated from all other apps just run better?  Easier to install and uninstall, etc.

      Isn’t this just what Linux did many, many, many years ago?  So all the other eye-candy and folding screen nonsense is just, once again, to disguise fixing Windows worst idea since  HDD became enormous and there is no longer a need to save disk space and code quality, reliability, functionality, and maybe even security will improve?

      That’s yet to be determined since syncing, sharing, and massive theft of personal data is the mantra of every big software company ensuring that one hack will compromise 10 to 20 devices.  For this worst case scenario I’d  be extremely happy to be proven totally WRONG!

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by steve1916.
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      • #2170982

        Isn’t this just what Linux did many, many, many years ago?

        Linux AND Apple/Mac realized this very long tima ago.
        And I would like to stress one more thing. Maybe two.

        ARM64 architecture does not support 64 bit apps.. yet.

        and no virtualisation (no hyper-V, no VMware).. yet.

        So it like a bigger smartphone. whos the target consumer? Windows is berserker, when it sees some dollars laying on the floor.

        Dell Latitude 3420, Intel Core i7 @ 2.8 GHz, 16GB RAM, W10 22H2 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        PRUSA i3 MK3S+

        • This reply was modified 4 years ago by doriel.
    • #2170548

      By Woody Leonhard
      Win10 on ARM, too, for that matter. All ended up in the bit bucket.

      Has Win10 on ARM really been consigned to the bit bucket (by anyone else)?

      Surface Pro X got some great reviews within the last few months:

      Surface Pro X solves big problems for many people in my – and similar – professions. All-day battery life, responsive UI, fast app launching, always-connected 4G LTE, and just beautiful hardware.
      Why Surface Pro X is my favorite laptop of 2019

      If you need a PC that’s always on LTE, turns on quickly, and brings the benefits of a 2-in-1 laptop, Surface Pro X solves some problems for you.
      Surface Pro X review: A perfect PC [12 days ago]

      Microsoft Edge (Chromium) for Windows 10 on ARM is not yet quite out of beta for a week or two:

      The ARM64 (64-bit) version of the new Edge browser runs exceptionally well on the Surface Pro X.
      Microsoft Edge for Surface Pro X (ARM64) is now in the Insider Beta channel

      Hasn’t your report grossly exaggerated the demise of Windows 10 on ARM?

      Repeat after me: Windows 10 on Arm is not Windows RT. …
      The two biggest advantages of the Arm platform, in my experience, are battery life and connectivity.
      Windows 10 on Arm

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      • #2171010

        Hasn’t your report grossly exaggerated the demise of Windows 10 on ARM?

        Quite possibly. Much depends on how well MS can adapt Win10 to ARM’s peculiarities – without affecting the way people use it. I’m skeptical, but it is possible.

        But I’ll stick by my claim that Win10 on ARM right now is dead.

    • #2170588

      Just wondering what the downside might be for this tech , besides needing to get new s/w once the transform is complete some time in the future. Seems like it requires a bit more overhead but is inherently more secure.

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
    • #2170652

      Maybe, but probably very doubtful, this could be a true Windows-7 successor.  Clearly, Microsoft has failed in its “one size fits all” attempt with Windows-10.

      Missing from MS’s current lineup of Operating Systems is one that is more robust that the ChromeBook OS; but does not have all the bells, whistles, smoke and mirrors, bloat, folderol, etc., etc., that is included in Windows-10.  Think of all the home and small to medium office users who just need to run a few applications (either proprietary or possibly from MS, Intuit, etc.), have Internet access for email and searching, and have no need or desire for the unwanted complexity and resulting instability of synching, cloud computing, touch screens, gaming, mobile device-centric UI, and who knows what else.  They have been ignored (very likely why Windows-7 remains so popular and stable).

      What was wrong with the former meaningful labels of “Home, Professional, Enterprise” that worked so well in Windows-7 and earlier versions?  Then, if one “wanted more, you paid more.”

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    • #2170946

      Special operating system for Microsoft devices? Am I reading this correctly? Shouldnt Windows 10 been “one rules them all – no more OS needed”?
      I thought that Windows 10 IoT is designed for these purposes.. mm interesting.. I rememember Windows Mobile on my HTC TITN downloading malware so fast after clean install, and calling to africa for example, so I immediately left Windows mobile and never came back.
      We use Windows 7 embeded (which looks just terrible) and its like to buy a hangar for playing with RC helicopter. Sorry for my scepticism, but releasing Windows 10X (read Windows ten ten – this is good one Microsoft XD ) seems to me like wasting time that could be used to patch the buggy patches.

      Dell Latitude 3420, Intel Core i7 @ 2.8 GHz, 16GB RAM, W10 22H2 Enterprise

      HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      PRUSA i3 MK3S+

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by doriel.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2170954

        OK, now I see that on different architecture its completely different OS. So.. why it has to be named Windows 10 at first place..

        Dell Latitude 3420, Intel Core i7 @ 2.8 GHz, 16GB RAM, W10 22H2 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        PRUSA i3 MK3S+

        • #2171111

          Microsoft had promised that Windows 10 would be the “last version of Windows ever”. Hard to believe given all the zillion feature upgrades for Windows 10, Windows 10S, and what have you (I have lost count, which is more than sufficient to say that Windows 10 most certainly wasn’t the “last version of Windows ever”).

          When Microsoft first launched Windows 10, their hopes were pretty high that it would truly be usable on everything and the experience would be as seamless as within Apple’s ecosystem. Five years later, it doesn’t look like they’ve succeeded, and they’ve been trying different ideas that either somewhat catch on or fail entirely. Windows 10S, for example, was a laughable failure. Windows 10X is their next attempt at realizing this dream; however, I don’t think Microsoft has learned from their previous failures just yet.

          It may be a completely different architecture, but to call it something else would break the “Windows 10 is the last version of Windows ever” claim, so they’re probably going to prefix all of their future products with “Windows 10” and add obscure letters or names after it just so they can technically claim it’s still “Windows 10”. Even if it isn’t.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2171008

      Ah, so that’s why they aren’t fixing this month’s patches.

      Windows has supported dual screens since at least XP.

      Windows 98 in fact!

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2172222

      the long-anticipated Windows Lite – er, Windows 10X”  -Woody

      In what ways Lite?  (wisecracks too obvious, so hold them)

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by carpintero.
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