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  • Windows 7 32bit: Can’t install KB4088878 onwards

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 7 Questions: Windows 7 Windows 7 32bit: Can’t install KB4088878 onwards

    This topic contains 11 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by

     HappyElderNerd 5 months ago.

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    • #201946 Reply

      anonymous

      Hi everyone.

      You may remember me. I posted a comment on one of askwoody articles and said I had trouble installing updates from Feb 2018 on. I also said I have Windows 7 Pro 32bit with 8GB Ram.

      I would like to say that regardless if you have 8GB or not, that won’t stop or cause you booting issues using a 32bit win OS. Only if bad mem. The RAM just does not get addressed more than about 3.5GB.

      Anyway I am still having issues with selected updates but this time, I used an image from one of my master drives where the updates, only up to Sept 2016, with no issues with any updates at that point. Plus before Microsoft’s new and bad patching method on Win 7.

      So I went through one by one and in order, all the main security updates only from here on ask woody. https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/2000003-ongoing-list-of-group-b-monthly-updates-for-win7-and-8-1/ Thanks for that BTW. Far better and easy to download all updates in one place. Anyway not Including IE or .net updates.

      This were hard this way doing it all one by one then rebooting. The first security only update I had issues with were patch KB4025337. I had issues with this and recovery started. It said bad patch but managed to boot in the end and patch installed, without using system restore.

      I installed all others until I got to March 2018 KB4088878. The same patch I had issues with before on my other drive. After installing, it blue screened and would not boot. So had no choice but to do system restore. It also said bad patch in the info while trying to do system repair.

      Event log says this as did before on my other drive. “Installation Failure: Windows failed to install the following update with error 0x80242016: Security Update for Windows (KB4088878)”

      It appears to me that from KB4088878 on, these patches are bad and not working. I can’t get to the bottom of why they wont install. Now stuck, as I need to install in order, as you said.

      Any idea as to what is the issue (or just Microsoft’s bad patches)?

    • #202120 Reply

      Elly
      AskWoody MVP

      Hello Anonymous,

      I’m not exactly clear if you were installing one SO update, then rebooting? For the patches in 2018 it might be better to install them all, then reboot… because fixes for the problematic patches are in the later ones. This might be a case of installing the newest one first, rebooting, then installing the all the rest, and then rebooting…

      What is your status with KB 4099950? At one point we were manually installing this because it wasn’t included in the Security Only patches, and it needed to be the version issued after April 17th. You might manually install KB 4099950 before the March-April-May updates. KB 4099950. I’m not sure it is needed any more… but it was a fix for the March problem. You might read A Protocol Question About KB 4099950 and “Patch Tuesday brings some surprises, some early crashes, and a surreal solution” as they explain the mess that patching was… which you may have gotten caught up in.

      To tell the truth, I got updated through April, and told about how I did it, here. That seems to have gotten me past the worst of the updating mess. What I really don’t know is if updating now, whether just installing June’s SO first, then the rest, will solve the problem, or whether you have to throw in KB 4099950… I am just sharing my own journey through that quagmire, not approaching this from tech expertise.

      Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

    • #202233 Reply

      anonymous

      Hi Elly. Thanks for your reply. I didn’t have KB4099950 installed. After reading about it I didn’t think it applied to me, as my NIC is realtek and thought it were mostly inlet NIC’s having the issues. I went ahead and installed anyway, as it were worth a try. KB4099950 installed fine but unfortunately it has made no difference after trying to install KB4088878.

      I get the same blue screen and have to do system restore once again. I get the same error as above in event viewer but said in the recovery section. No root cause, auto system failover etc.

      So once again Not able to install KB4088878. My CPU should not be an issue as it supports SSE2. It’s a 2600k.

      I will copy and paste list of all the recent updates installed and few from 2016 when I backed this up as a drive clone, image for you to see the update history. I know this is not a ask woody issue but could someone contact the windows update mini tool team and get them to allow, copy text for update history as it is shown in the window. I can’t believe I am not able to do this, as you can do so for installed. That is dumb. I had to use two bits of software and edit it to a usable format and were a pain. Hope this dont make post to long.

       

      Security Update for Windows (KB4088878)                    Windows    08/07/2018    Failed (0x80242016)
          Update for Windows          (KB4099950)                    Windows    08/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4088878)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Failed (0x80242016)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4074587)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4056897)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB40 54521)                Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4048960)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4041678)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4038779)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4034679)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4025337)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4022722)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4019263)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4015546)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB4012212)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB3212642)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB3205394)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB3197867)                    Windows    06/07/2018    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows (KB3192391)                    Windows 7 16/09/2016    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Advanced Micro Devices – Audio Device – (KB3139923)                    Windows 7 16/09/2016    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows 7 (KB3175024)                Windows 7 16/09/2016    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Security Update for Windows 7 (KB3161958)                Windows 7 16/09/2016    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool – September 2016 (KB890830)    Windows 7 16/09/2016    Succeeded (0x00000000)
          Update for Windows 7 (KB3170735)                    Windows 7 16/09/2016    Succeeded (0x00000000)

      • #202235 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Try this:
        Install the June 2018 SO KB4284867.
        Reboot the computer. Wait 15 minutes after login.
        Install the Mar – May SOs. If the Mar SO fails, go ahead and install Apr and May.

        Let us know if this works

    • #202252 Reply

      anonymous

      .Hi PCano. I’m afraid is bad news. It didn’t work. 🙁

      I tried KB4284867 first and it were the worst thing to do. It blue screened on me and took a good twenty min in recovery mode, trying to fix it, even after restoring.

      It said this after it completed repairs for that June 2018 SKB4284867 patch

      Root cause
      Unspecified changes to system configuration might have caused the problem.

      After all that I worked backwards to try, May 2018 KB 4103712. I had the same issues as June and another good  15 to 20 min system recovery. So both failed to install. I won’t bother with April 2018 as I am sure the same will happen as last two.

      Last two logs from windows update.

      Security Update for Windows (KB4284867)
      Windows    08/07/2018    Failed (0x80242016)    wusa
      Security Update for Windows (KB4103712) Windows    08/07/2018    Failed (0x80242016)    wusa

      It sort of defeats the object, working backwards like that and we should not have to.

      I really think Microsoft have broken these update patches , so much this year. Still not moving to windows 10 microsoft.

    • #202327 Reply

      anonymous

      Well PKCano I did run windows update troubleshooter and it said, Service registration is missing or corrupt and fixed it . Eveything else were OK.

      I believe them updates I did before, may of cause the corruption. So after that I tried once again to install KB4088878. Still the same and same error.

      Unless there is another option, fix, I have come to the conclusion that the march 2018 update and after, is completely screwed up bad. You can see from my update history that all installed with no major issues but soon as march 2018 needs to install, it’s no go. Microsoft needs to sort this out.

      I haven’t installed any net framework updates or updated it. I did find under the old windows updates system that, installing the latest net framework, actually caused windows update issues but would installing all and any net framework updates, help do you think?

      • #202332 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        I don’t think the .NET are the solution.

        If I had access to the machine, there are things I would try, but it’s a little too far to swim. I would uninstall everything installed after Jan 1, 2018. I would quit trying to use Group B and try to bring the computer up to date using Group A (hide all the Rollups offered after Jan 1, 2018 and the telemetry patches, install all the older updates for Win, unhide all the Rollups from Jan-June, and install the Rollup(s) offered. If that didn’t work, I would reset Win Update by deleting the datastore. If that didn’t work, I would use the System Restore disks (if you didn’t make them when you got the computer you can do it now)). So what do I recommend?

        My first recommendation is to back up your data to an external drive or USB. That is EVERYTHING under your User ID (C:\Users\<UserID>
        Then seek help – a techy friend, a computer shop you trust. They are probably going to reinstall Windows, so have your software disks available to reinstall all your programs.

    • #202372 Reply

      Elly
      AskWoody MVP

      March 13, 2018—KB4088878 (Security-only update) had a lot of issues identified by Microsoft… so it isn’t like there was one problem. I noticed that Microsoft has added a problem with drivers where 32-bit (x86) computer won’t boot or keeps restarting after applying the security update.:

      “Before applying this security update and subsequent security updates, uninstall the following external drivers until they are fixed by the vendor that owns them:

      HASP Kernel Device Driver (a.k.a. Haspnt.sys)
      Hard Lock Key Drivers (a.k.a. hardlock.sys)”

      You wouldn’t have those on your system, would you?

      Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

    • #202444 Reply

      anonymous

      PKCano thanks. I have now installed all .Net updates and few others but no difference at all, as you said, in installing the security updates. I even tried to install June 2018 KB4284826 rollup but even that won’t install and has same error as before.

      I could reinstall myself, so no need to get someone to do it for me but installing all updates, again would be a pain and take ages. I may try and see if July 2018 windows updates install but likely same issue I think.

      Elly. No I am not aware I have them drivers as I don’t use that sort of software.

      I have give up for now. Unless anyone knows what is the issues with March 2018 and after updates, knows how to fix it. I will just have to keep using windows 7 without the newer updates.

      Thanks anyway.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #202450 Reply

      EP
      AskWoody_MVP

      you’re using a Realtek NIC device, mr anonymous?

      Install the latest Realtek NIC driver from their web site.

      fixing the KB4088878 update problem & above is another story that I’m still puzzled.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #309336 Reply

      HappyElderNerd
      AskWoody Plus

      Here’s how I’m preserving my sanity during this era when M$ exhibits its’ gross incompetency in software development, compounded by the inability to fix problems THEY create in trying to “Fix” things.  I am eager to adopt any other software product, provided my local (non-technical) clients can use it, which rules out Linux.

      First of all, I have a strict policy about how software products and data are separated.  Consider the C: and D: partitions:  C: is for Code, D: is for Data.  Where I can move data off the C: drive, to place it on the D: drive, I do.  That means that I can “roll back” a system’s executables and code (and its’ own configuration data) without losing valuable data.  For example, all my financial data (in Quicken) is stored on the D: drive (or, by extension, some other external drive shared by several computers), while Quicken itself is on the C: drive.  By keeping these rigidly separated, I can (for example) attempt an update of Windows on the C: drive, knowing full well that when it fails, I can roll-back to last nights’ backup of the C: drive, without loss of any data changes I may’ve made.  Rather waste an hour than lose my completed work.

      Next, I have a robust backup plan for 100% of all computers, each and every day, both code and data.  On any given day, I can roll any particular computer back to any day in the past 15 days.  So, if I attempt an update to Windows, and (as it usually does) it fails, I merely roll an older C drive backup onto the computer, and proceed as if nothing had been attempted.

      If the update works for several days without failure, I can then confidently perform the same change to other computers in the network.  It’s a practice I can use for small businesses and home network…but, then, none of my clients (or my own network) have more than a peak of six computers.  And, after all computers have been updated to a particular update level, I can proceed to the next Microsoft pending update.

      It’s tiresome, and time consuming, and I shouldn’t have to do it…if Microsoft had any integrity about its’ products, I wouldn’t have to…but as they’re the only game in town for common PCs, I’m forced into these contortions to keep my networks reliable.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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