• Windows 8.1 is getting close to the finish line

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    #2456600

    I know there are a fair amount of Askwoody readership that are still using Windows 8.1. Microsoft will be including a nag notification soon to indicat
    [See the full post at: Windows 8.1 is getting close to the finish line]

    Susan Bradley Patch Lady

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    • #2456603

      I have a Windows 8.0 laptop that hasn’t received Windows updates in years (except for the occasional Office 2010 updates that now seem to have stopped completely).  🙂

      It’s served me well, protected with the same multi-layered strategy described in this thread.

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2456985

        Did you know that Server 2012 updates will install just fine on Windows 8.0?

        If you’re so inclined, all you have to do is download them from the MS catalog and install them manually and you’ll have yourself a completely up-to-date Windows 8.0 system as of June 2022 (and going forward).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2456607

      Microsoft doesn’t offer free upgrades from 8.1 to 10/11.
      Microsoft wants users to buy a new 10/11 license or a new PC.

      • #2456645

        Anticipating the end of support for W8.1, I recently did an in-place upgrade from W8.1 Pro to W10 Pro. I downloaded the W10 ISO using the MS Media Creation Tool and installed from a USB thumb drive. W10 Pro was automatically activated with a perpetual digital license based upon W8.1 Pro having a valid product key. In effect, the free upgrade to W10 from W8.1 still worked despite MS saying the offer expired a long time ago. I did my upgrade at the end of March of this year. This has also been reported by others but I cannot verify anything other than my experience.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2456981

          Windows 10 is my planned upgrade via the ISO, so it is good to know it is likely to work.

    • #2456624

      Two thirds of our pre-planned done here with images should the need arise to revert back for any legacy programs offline.
      ‘I love it when a plan comes together – ‘Hannibal’ Smith, A Team ;)/

      Also notable on 10th Jan 2023
      Win7 gets it’s last ESU patch perhaps with SSU and/or dotNET updates?

      From 15th Oct 2023, Windows Server 2012 R2 will be offered ESU for 3 years at a cost per annum period which expires on 13th October 2026 over the whole course.
      Datacenter, Essentials, Embedded, Foundation and Standard.
      No indication of incremental costs yet…

      I’ll certainly miss Win7 with ESUb sniff

    • #2456719

      Susan,

      Thank you for the “heads up” on 8.1’s end-of-life.  I’m one of the “fair amount of AskWoody readership” that has used 8/8.1 since inception and have been very satisfied with the platform.  It has done everything I’ve needed and I’ve avoided all of the missteps/hiccups/mistakes/problems of subsequent Windows releases that have occurred.  I have checked in with <b>OPatch</b> and at the time a decision had not been made for future support so it’s good to hear that you’ll follow-up with OPatch as the countdown proceeds.  I can pay a reasonable price to continue to use 8.1 if support occurs.

      Thank you too for all of the rough, tough, it ain’t easy work you do each day to help us all navigate through the WorldWideWeb.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2456773

      Been using 8.1 x64 on an HTPC, just because I use WMC with a tuner-card.  Though since MS stopped providing EPG support for WMC it isn’t that viable any more.  I guess there are some hacks to get WMC installed on Win 10.  I know Python org stopped supporting Win 7 after Python 3.8 I think it had to do with long path names but there are forks for 3.9 or 3.10 that still install on Win 7.  Is there anything in Win32 api that would break 8.1 after EOL?

      • #2456833

        Is there anything in Win32 api that would break 8.1 after EOL?

        Given W7 hasn’t broken it seems unlikely W8/8.1 will break.

        cheers, Paul

    • #2456830

      Start planning now? I don’t see why I need to.

      I shall continue to use 8.1 (and 7) on most of my machines while switching one or two of them to Windows 10 1607 LTSB or 1809 LTSC as the main OS, which is already installed on the system disk in another partition (but the older Windows will be kept in case I need it in the future). Other versions of “newer” Windows are not worth my time, including the rubbish 11.

      I don’t care about the so-called “security” as I am strongly convinced it is blown out of proportion regarding most people. I have never had a problem regarding “security” using unsupported operating systems in the past and I don’t expect any going forward.

      While 8.1 won’t have an ESU, the server sibling of 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2 (whose end of support is in October 2023 and not January 2023), will have an ESU that ends in October 2026 :
      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/get-started/extended-security-updates-overview

      Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2456839

      I don’t care about the so-called “security” as I am strongly convinced it is blown out of proportion regarding most people

      You’re wasting your time fixing 97 percent of vulnerabilities

      According to new research only three percent of ‘critical’ code vulnerabilities are attackable, which means developers should be able to better prioritize efforts and significantly reduce their workload.

      The study from automated security testing firm ShiftLeft finds that focusing on the three percent allows teams to greatly speed up and simplify efforts. ShiftLeft saw a 37 percent improvement from last year in mean time to remediate new vulnerabilities with a median scan time of 1 minute 30 seconds…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2456919

      I know there are a fair amount of Askwoody readership that are still using Windows 8.1. Microsoft will be including a nag notification soon to indicat
      [See the full post at: Windows 8.1 is getting close to the finish line]

      Hi Susan,

      Thanks for heads up. Did Microsoft bring this date forward? I had assumed it would have been October 2023 since Windows 8.1 had its General Availability in October 2013.

      Have a good day.

    • #2456920

      Start planning now? I don’t see why I need to.

      I shall continue to use 8.1 (and 7) on most of my machines while switching one or two of them to Windows 10 1607 LTSB or 1809 LTSC as the main OS, which is already installed on the system disk in another partition (but the older Windows will be kept in case I need it in the future). Other versions of “newer” Windows are not worth my time, including the rubbish 11.

      I don’t care about the so-called “security” as I am strongly convinced it is blown out of proportion regarding most people. I have never had a problem regarding “security” using unsupported operating systems in the past and I don’t expect any going forward.

      While 8.1 won’t have an ESU, the server sibling of 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2 (whose end of support is in October 2023 and not January 2023), will have an ESU that ends in October 2026 :
      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/get-started/extended-security-updates-overview

      Your decision to care/not care is your own decision.

      For me with family members using a shared Windows 8.1 system, I care about their security since I can’t watch them 24/7 (nor would I want to). Yes, we have anti-malware, anti-ransomware software and use up to date versions of Microsoft Outlook 365 and web browsers but over time the security vulnerabilities will become more and more and I can’t expect these users to be perfect all the time to stay safe. Office 365 will likely drop support in early 2023 or shortly afterwards too.

      If they purchase new software or hardware, it’s a lot less likely to work on Windows 8.1. In the future. I’m considering either upgrading those systems to Windows 10 22H2 or Windows 11 22H2, I’ll discuss it with them.

      Only the minority of my systems run Windows 8.1 so it won’t be too big of an issue to upgrade.

      • #2459754

        Hi everyone,

        Upon closer examination, one of my Windows 8.1 systems will require hardware replacement since my CPU, a 6 core Intel Core i7 Extreme 980X from 2010 is not supported for use with Windows 10:

        https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/minimum/supported/windows-10-21h2-supported-intel-processors

        I suspect if I was to begin the installation Windows 10 I would simply receive an error message. Instead I intend to replace the CPU, motherboard and RAM with a new Intel 12th generation CPU. I’ll then install Windows 11 (I’ll install it on an SSD since I realize Microsoft will require this soon).

        I also know the GPU is really old too but its still supported by Nvidia and is powerful enough for my needs. I’ll replace it in the future if necessary. Those new Nvidia Geforce RTX 4000 series look enticing.

        The specification of this old system is provided. I’d appreciate if anyone could confirm if my conclusion (above) is correct. I built this system many years ago and I’d hate to see what was once a flagship system be scrapped if it didn’t need to be. Many thanks for any advice:

        =========================

        CPU: Intel Core i7 980X (6 core, 12 threads)(Gulftown architecture)

        RAM: 12 GB DDR3 (Triple channel configuration)

        Motherboard: Asus P6X58D Premium (BIOS 0703)

        GPU: Nvidia Geforce GTX 980 (with 4 GB RAM)

        =========================

        • #2459928

          According to this post it works with W11, so 10 should be OK.
          https://www.reddit.com/r/Windows11/comments/o9vp8b/windows_11_build_2200051_on_my_i7_980x_rig/

          cheers, Paul

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2466476

          Hi Paul,

          You were correct.

          I used the Media Creation tool for Windows 10 and it checked my older Windows 8.1 system for compatibility and began downloading Windows 10. So it appears my system is compatible after all.

          Many thanks for this.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2459944

          …I suspect if I was to begin the installation Windows 10 I would simply receive an error message. Instead I intend to replace the CPU, motherboard and RAM with a new Intel 12th generation CPU. I’ll then install Windows 11 (I’ll install it on an SSD since I realize Microsoft will require this soon)…

          I’ve never owned a Win 8.x computer, but does anyone know if Win 8.x users can still use Microsoft’s Get Windows 10 app mentioned in the 04-Jun-2021 groovypost article How to Check if Your Computer Can Run Windows 10 to see if their system meets Win 10 minimum specifications?  Is there a third-party utility that can do this for you?

          I have a relatively new Win 10 Pro v21H2 computer and used Robert Maehl’s  WhyNotWin11 utility to confirm my machine will be able to upgrade to Win 11, although I have no plans to do so for now. The system requirements on the download page <here> say that WhyNotWin11 should run on Win 8.1, although it’s optimized for Win 10.
          —————
          Dell Inspiron 5584 * 64-bit Win 10 Pro v21H2 build 19044.1766 * Intel i5-8265U CPU, 8 GB RAM, 256 GB Toshiba KBG40ZNS256G NVMe SSD, Intel UHD Graphics 620

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2456953

      Thank you for the “heads up” on 8.1’s end-of-life.

      I dislike seeing the phrase “End of Life” when referring to an operating system.  It’s really End of Support by Microsoft in the case of Windows.  For me still using Win 7, that means I can’t get album covers for my mp3 songs anymore (not a real big deal).  I’ve got old computers (with HDD’s) that are still running Win 95B, Win 98 SE, and Win XP Pro.

      When Antivirus and Web Browsers stop offering updates, that’s when you have to consider whether it’s still safe to go on the web.  Other than that you can keep using your favorite OS for a long time.  I have a museum piece – an IBM PS/1, ca. 1993 with DOS and Win 3.1 that is still running well!  I mostly play old games on these older computers, and have and use Lotus SmartSuite ’97 on the Win XP laptop.

      We're getting Sticker Shock everywhere now, not just car dealers.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2456970

        — deprecated, but not dead.

        Carpe Diem {with backup and coffee}
        offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
        offline▸ Acer AspireOne Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD GuineaPig
        online▸ Win11Pro 21H2.22000.795 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox104.0b6 MicrosoftDefender WuMgr
    • #2456975

      — deprecated, but not dead.

      Agreed.

    • #2456976

      Thank you for the “heads up” on 8.1’s end-of-life.

      I dislike seeing the phrase “End of Life” when referring to an operating system.  It’s really End of Support by Microsoft in the case of Windows.  For me still using Win 7, that means I can’t get album covers for my mp3 songs anymore (not a real big deal).  I’ve got old computers (with HDD’s) that are still running Win 95B, Win 98 SE, and Win XP Pro.

      When Antivirus and Web Browsers stop offering updates, that’s when you have to consider whether it’s still safe to go on the web.  Other than that you can keep using your favorite OS for a long time.  I have a museum piece – an IBM PS/1, ca. 1993 with DOS and Win 3.1 that is still running well!  I mostly play old games on these older computers, and have and use Lotus SmartSuite ’97 on the Win XP laptop.

      Hi Charlie,

      I hope you are doing well.

      Like you I have older virtual machines running Windows 98, Windows XP and Windows 7 that I use for various old software including games from 1992 which I bought on floppy disks back then and still love to play. I intend to keep using those OSes for a long time since they aren’t on the web any longer.

      But for those less technically savvy than you and I, they will need a system for their daily lives that they can rely on.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2457014

      I upgraded for free a Win7 machine a few months ago. An old Dell that was sitting unused. Took hours for catalog of Win10 updates. Went more or less painlessly. I’m not a techie, but can follow instructions! Unfortunately within a few days the HDD failed unexpectedly and catastrophically. Unable to image to new SSD. But, the upgrade was free.

      • #2457062

        Unable to image to new SSD

        What happens when you try?
        What software are you using?
        What hardware?

        cheers, Paul

        • #2457186

          I kept getting a factory prompt to choose a boot source. When I took out the HHD and plugged it into an external dock on my Win7 desktop the Seagate tools said it was dead. It wouldn’t even spin up. I was going to use Macrium to do a system image to boot from a Samsung EVO SSD.  So, with the HHD being dead I don’t have a valid MS “key”. I did somehow manage to do a basic, no account sign-in win10 home OS install using another HDD, but as it had no valid “key” from the dead HDD I could not use some basic functions and it was just too limited to try work around every time I turned on the computer. I don’t have the tech know-how to try anything else. That’s ok, I have 2 working XP desktops, a Win7 desktop & laptop, and 3 Win10 desktops. Why? People said they kept crashing and gave them to me!!! woo-hoo!

        • #2457202

          Might make a nice Linux box for surfing / email.

          cheers, Paul

    • #2457021

      Been using 8.1 x64 on an HTPC, just because I use WMC with a tuner-card.  Though since MS stopped providing EPG support for WMC it isn’t that viable any more.  I guess there are some hacks to get WMC installed on Win 10.  I know Python org stopped supporting Win 7 after Python 3.8 I think it had to do with long path names but there are forks for 3.9 or 3.10 that still install on Win 7.  Is there anything in Win32 api that would break 8.1 after EOL?

      There’s no problem installing WMC on Windows 10: I did it a couple of months ago on a laptop that I keep in front of our treadmill. The trick lies in keeping WMC installed each time Windows 10 gets forcibly moved to a new version. In this regard, it helps that this laptop never connects to the Internet, so I don’t have to deal with that recurring uninstallation/reinstallation hassle.  🙂  I only use it to watch programs recorded on other PCs which I then copy over as needed.

      Regarding the program guide, Schedules Direct offers an inexpensive subscription to listings that are better than what Microsoft used to provide, which you can download with the free EPG123 application. You can read all about this and SD at The Green Button.

    • #2457079

      > Nah it’ll be fine

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2457214

      So, with the HHD being dead I don’t have a valid MS “key”.

      There are many services the can rescue a “dead” HDD, for a cost.

    • #2459952

      According to this post it works with W11, so 10 should be OK.
      https://www.reddit.com/r/Windows11/comments/o9vp8b/windows_11_build_2200051_on_my_i7_980x_rig/

      cheers, Paul

      Hi Paul,

      Many thanks for this. I’ll check if this system passes the compatibility check of the Windows 10 installation for 21H2 in the coming days and post an update.

    • #2459954

      …I suspect if I was to begin the installation Windows 10 I would simply receive an error message. Instead I intend to replace the CPU, motherboard and RAM with a new Intel 12th generation CPU. I’ll then install Windows 11 (I’ll install it on an SSD since I realize Microsoft will require this soon)…

      I’ve never owned a Win 8.x computer, but does anyone know if Win 8.x users can still use Microsoft’s Get Windows 10 app mentioned in the 04-Jun-2021 groovypost article How to Check if Your Computer Can Run Windows 10 to see if their system meets Win 10 minimum specifications?  Is there a third-party utility that can do this for you?

      I have a relatively new Win 10 Pro v21H2 computer and used Robert Maehl’s  WhyNotWin11 utility to confirm my machine will be able to upgrade to Win 11, although I have no plans to do so for now. The system requirements on the download page <here> say that WhyNotWin11 should run on Win 8.1, although it’s optimized for Win 10.
      —————
      Dell Inspiron 5584 * 64-bit Win 10 Pro v21H2 build 19044.1766 * Intel i5-8265U CPU, 8 GB RAM, 256 GB Toshiba KBG40ZNS256G NVMe SSD, Intel UHD Graphics 620

      Hi lmacri,

      I remember running that Get Windows 10 utility on this system back in 2015 and it gave the system a pass after checking if installing Windows 10 was possible. I was under the impression though that Microsoft controversially dropped support for my CPUs since then.

      I’ll check if I can find that report from 2015, I do remember saving it. I’ll run that WhyNotWin11 utility on this system too. I have used it on other systems before. I know I’ll have to scrap this system sometime but its working perfectly and it more than meets my requirements for the role it fulfills for me so Windows 10 would be preferable to a rebuild.

      Yes, I realize I can bypass CPU and TPM requirements and install Windows 11 anyway but I wouldn’t be confident on how long such measures would work for before you stop being offered larger annual feature updates. While I do have spare TPM v2 modules, the systems motherboard doesn’t have the header/connector for them, its too old.

      Thanks very much and I’ll let you know what I find out.

    • #2466477

      …I suspect if I was to begin the installation Windows 10 I would simply receive an error message. Instead I intend to replace the CPU, motherboard and RAM with a new Intel 12th generation CPU. I’ll then install Windows 11 (I’ll install it on an SSD since I realize Microsoft will require this soon)…

      I’ve never owned a Win 8.x computer, but does anyone know if Win 8.x users can still use Microsoft’s Get Windows 10 app mentioned in the 04-Jun-2021 groovypost article How to Check if Your Computer Can Run Windows 10 to see if their system meets Win 10 minimum specifications?  Is there a third-party utility that can do this for you?

      I have a relatively new Win 10 Pro v21H2 computer and used Robert Maehl’s  WhyNotWin11 utility to confirm my machine will be able to upgrade to Win 11, although I have no plans to do so for now. The system requirements on the download page <here> say that WhyNotWin11 should run on Win 8.1, although it’s optimized for Win 10.
      —————
      Dell Inspiron 5584 * 64-bit Win 10 Pro v21H2 build 19044.1766 * Intel i5-8265U CPU, 8 GB RAM, 256 GB Toshiba KBG40ZNS256G NVMe SSD, Intel UHD Graphics 620

      Hi lmacri,

      I tried using the WhyNotWindows11 tool on my older Windows 8.1 system.

      While it informed me the system is not compatible, it didn’t provide any insight into whether it was compatible with Windows 10.

      I used the Media Creation tool for Windows 10 and it checked my older Windows 8.1 system for compatibility and began downloading Windows 10. So it appears my system is compatible after all.

      Many thanks.

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