News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon

We're community supported and proud of it!

  • Windows memory usage

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Windows memory usage

    • This topic has 14 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by anonymous.
    Viewing 12 reply threads
    • Author
      Posts
      • #2365243
        rbhall52
        AskWoody Plus

        When you restart windows 10, the memory usage goes way down or at least down quite a bit. How can I get the memory usage to go down in the same way without restarting windows?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2365260
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        When you restart windows 10, the memory usage goes way down or at least down quite a bit. How can I get the memory usage to go down in the same way without restarting windows?

        Memory is there to be used not to be un-used.
        The only problem would be if your memory usage is always at 100%.
        In that case you should add more RAM.
        Ideal RAM amount for Windows 10 is 16GB. 8GB of RAM is Adecvate.

        You can check in Task Manager RAM usage by application and see if any application consumes a lot of RAM.

      • #2366493
        rbhall52
        AskWoody Plus

        You did not really answer my question. I just want to know how to reduce memory usage as if I had restarted my computer, but without restarting it. Perhaps someone else can answer my question.

      • #2366500
        PaulK
        AskWoody Lounger

        Is this a fair re-construction of your question:
        What is occupying/filling-up memory as I use the system?

        How, and at what points, are you determining the ‘memory usage’?

        When you say “restart Windows”, does this mean immediately after a boot (as soon as you can get a measurement), or after Windows has settled down for a bit, but before you have started using the system?

        Are you familiar with the Resource Monitor, RESMON? Use the (tab) Memory.
        Note that one can re-sequence the data by clicking on the column headers.

        Suggestion:
        Take a screen shot after booting, at a convenient time. Perhaps several shots, with different columns sequenced.
        Use the system for awhile.
        Take another screen shot(s), to match the initial one(s).
        Compare the set(s) of shots to see what “Images” are still in memory.

        And no, this doesn’t answer your question as to how to purge ‘excess'(?) memory usage, but it will give you some clue as to who all is responsible for all the bits that are there.

      • #2366559
        rbhall52
        AskWoody Plus

        What is occupying/filling-up memory as I use the system?

        Me – What is filling up memory before I use the system as I have just logged in already see a lot of memory usage.

        How, and at what points, are you determining the ‘memory usage’?

        Me – answered above.

        When you say “restart Windows”, does this mean immediately after a boot (as soon as you can get a measurement), or after Windows has settled down for a bit, but before you have started using the system?

        Me – I mean just restart windows 10 at some point during the week when the memory usage after I have just logged in is about 50 percent before I have started doing anything on the computer.

        Are you familiar with the Resource Monitor, RESMON? Use the (tab) Memory.
        Note that one can re-sequence the data by clicking on the column headers.

        Me – I have read about RESMON, but I don’t think I’ve tried to use it. I will try that and see what it tells me.

      • #2366595
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I just want to know how to reduce memory usage as if I had restarted my computer, but without restarting it.

        Why do you care ? Does your PC reach 100% of RAM usage ? How much RAM does your device have ?
        The more RAM the OS uses the better ! With lack of RAM the system will use swap file with extensive HDD read/writes.
        RAM is orders of magnitude faster than an SSD in read/write speed.

        SSD – up to 750MB/sec , RAM – 12,800MB/sec

        • #2366717
          rbhall52
          AskWoody Plus

          Actually, we’re talking about clearing unused memory, which would be a good thing. That way, windows has more memory to use for all programs :).

      • #2366601
        anonymous
        Guest

        It is possible that you have program(s) which are allocating RAM for their use when they are running, but the program(s) do not free the RAM back to the Windows “pool” when the program(s) stop, so you appear to have more RAM in use when idle after PC use, compared to when idle after start-up. (“Possible”, but not certain.)

        There is a 3rd party program called “CleanMem” which aims to “clean” up stray RAM in this scenario. It frees the RAM still allocated to process(es) which are no longer running.

        I have had “CleanMem” installed on PCs running Windows 7 and 8.1 for several years – the installer for version 2.5.0 which I have squirrelled away is dated Aug 2015.

        I have installed this in some earlier Windows 10 installations (the most recent version 1909), but I use W10 so rarely I don’t have the same experience with it on W10 PCs. I don’t know if its developer officially supports W10.

        Basically, either manually or in the background using timers in the Windows task scheduler, “CleanMem” checks RAM allocated to processes and makes sure that the process is still running. If the process is not running, it calls a Windows OS function to free the RAM back to the Windows RAM pool.

        It includes a fancy “monitor” just above the taskbar in the lower right corner which I usually switch off. (“CleanMem” is free, but I believe the paid for version includes extra options to tweak this “monitor”. I have no experience of this.)

        This leaves a traffic light coloured square icon in the taskbar which includes the percentage of RAM used as a number 0..100. I think it is coloured green below 50% RAM usage and red above 70-something%, but I don’t remember the percentages exactly. (I don’t normally have a red icon in that corner of the screen, so on the rare occasions it appears I catch it out of the corner of my eye.) There is also a “start with windows” tick box which needs to be ticked – possibly to put the square icon on the taskbar, but I forget. You might need to tweak it a bit to get it how you like it – for me this was several years ago.

        The task scheduler timer events can be tweaked. I normally set them to 5 minute intervals, because the longer default settings (whose value I forget) seemed a little too long to me.

        I don’t know if this will solve your problem, or will work as well or at all with the latest Windows 10 (constantly changing unlike W7 and W8.1), but it might.

        HTH. Garbo.

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2366708
          rbhall52
          AskWoody Plus

          I have used cleanmem for years myself, and it works pretty well, but I just tried rammap from sysinternals, and it cleared the working sets, which freed up a bit of memory, so I will start using both programs as the need arises. Thanks to EricB for the rammap suggestion, and to anonymous for mentioning cleanmem.

          I  have seen the way all programs allocate memory under windows when they start up, and they never deallocate it and clean up after themselves once they are up, running, and waiting for user input.  I have been a computer programmer for several decades, and it seems to me a rather simple task to find out which microsoft functions cleanmem uses and rammap uses, and to use those functions to clean things up for the user as you are waiting for user input. I know cleanmem using such functions because they explain how their program works. I’m not as sure about rammap along those lines.

      • #2366691
        ClearThunder
        AskWoody Plus

        I’ve been having this very same issue with Win10 (pro) since I bought my computer. When I start the machine, and all the startup programs are done loading, it shows I have 2.8GB of RAM used. So, let’s say I open firefox with 18 tabs (typical). It will show 5.2GB of RAM used. Then I’ll launch Excel, then Word, then Adobe reader. Now the monitor shows I am using 8.3GB of RAM.

        I use a neat app called ‘Mo0 System Monitor’ that monitors RAM used, CPU core temp, fan speed, usage, GPU usage, fan speeds, etc. And I watch those processes as I use the machine. This little app is included in the 2.8GB figure when the rig is started up.

        Then I’ll close Excel, Word and Adobe. My memory used drops to 6.9GB. When I close firefox and those 18 tabs, the monitor shows 5.9GB of RAM is still being used.

        By what?

        I started with using only 2.8GB of RAM. All the programs I opened gobbled up almost 6GB of RAM, but when I closed those programs, you’d think I would get that 6GB back. But No.

        Yea, I checked task manager. Apps look OK (none are open), and the background processes look about right. But that’s when I stopped scrolling down the list because I can only take so much mediocrity. Just looking at all the running windows processes …. all 89 of them ….. gets me depressed.

        I remember back in the late 90’s people were having these issues with Win95, then Win98, then XP, et al. It seems that this ‘mystery memory’ issue has been around as long as windows has. Back in those days, I used to use a small app called ‘Memory Defragmenter’ which helped somewhat and it freed-up a few MB (Yes, MB …. we’re talking 1990’s here),
        but it wasn’t a proactive solution, only reactive. And now, 26 years later, it seems we’re all still struggling to find out what is using our memory after closing the programs that once used it up.

        When I bought my first computer in 1994 (which I still have and still works) the IT guy where I worked told me that the first thing Windows does after it boots up is it “grabs” all of your available memory to use for programs. What he didn’t tell me is that it doesn’t always like to give it back.

        "Censorship is thought control" ----- Ronald Reagan

      • #2366692
        EricB
        AskWoody Plus

        Take a look at the https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/downloads/rammap

        This utility from Microsoft will provide a lot of information about memory usage and also includes an option to empty the different types of system working sets.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2366727
        joep517
        AskWoody MVP

        Windows does a good job managing RAM. Leave it alone. It will free up RAM when needed. When a program terminates not all the memory it used may be released immediately. There could be language support routines loaded that are likely to be used by other programs. It would be inefficient to free that RAM only to load it shortly thereafter.

        Memory cleaners/optimizers are snake oil. Do some true tracking and testing. You will find the system does not run any better after using one of these apps than before using it. As Alex said above, RAM is there to be used.

         

        --Joe

      • #2366730
        Susan Bradley
        Manager

        Launch task manager, which application is sucking up that ram? If there is something that stays in the background and sucks memory you typically have to find out a. how to really close that application or b. talk to other users how they deal with the memory use and specifically c. complain to the vendor that their application is doing this.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      • #2366753
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Actually, we’re talking about clearing unused memory, which would be a good thing. That way, windows has more memory to use for all programs :).

        Windows OS takes care of that automatically.

      • #2366803
        anonymous
        Guest

        Is there any little used software you do not need?

        For some relevant knowledge and fun here’s a good video: Dave was an engineer at Microsoft and answers the question of Why Does a Reboot Fix Everything?

    Viewing 12 reply threads

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, no politics or religion.

    Reply To: Windows memory usage

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.