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  • Woody’s Windows Watch: Seven Semper Fi – How to ride Win7 into the sunset

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Woody’s Windows Watch: Seven Semper Fi – How to ride Win7 into the sunset

    This topic contains 39 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 3 months, 3 weeks ago.

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    • #342800 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Humbug. The Windows “experts” who say that you should throw away your Win7 machine because it’s too old are just out of touch. Ain’t broke, don’t fix.
      [See the full post at: Woody’s Windows Watch: Seven Semper Fi – How to ride Win7 into the sunset]

    • #342846 Reply

      DavidForrest57
      AskWoody Lounger

      An interesting idea. However, I think an experiment of this type needs some kind of benchmark for comparison.

      Will a fully patched, but otherwise similarly equipped Windows 10 PC be run alongside under the same conditions?

      As with all experiments, the devil is in the detail. How is the experiment to be run, and what results are you looking for?

      • #342879 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        It’s not a question of performance.  At least, not hardware performance.

        I want to find out what obstacles appear, and how to overcome them.

        To me,  Win10 is not the only alternative.

        • #343049 Reply

          DavidForrest57
          AskWoody Lounger

          I wasn’t thinking of hardware performance, but of online security.

          There are widely differing opinions regarding the use of Windows 7 after “end of Microsoft support” (let’s call it EOMS, not EOS or EOL, because that’s what it is) in 2020. Some argue that it will become a dangerously flawed OS that nobody should contemplate using beyond 2020; others argue that simple precautionary measures will keep the OS going for years (see https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/dont-worry-about-win7-after-2020-firefox-just-quit-supporting-xp/). Where does the truth lie?

          From my own experience, I used XP for 3 years beyond EOMS and didn’t have any problems. Was I lucky? Was this a result of good computing practices? Maybe the threat wasn’t as great as some would have had us believe? Maybe I had problems and was blissfully unaware of them? In all honesty, I don’t know the answer.

          So I’d value some kind of controlled experiment to establish the real-world dangers of using Windows 7 beyond 2020.

          I could continue to use Windows 7 for some years beyond 2020. I’ll keep my browser patched. Antivirus and malware scanner will be kept up to date and scans run regularly. I’ll use a standard user account for everyday tasks and the administrator account will only be used when necessary. This system will be fully backed up, so that it can be restored if problems do arise. Beyond that, I could dual-boot with a Linux distro, using that for online work while keeping Windows offline.

          I agree that Windows 10 isn’t the only alternative (to Windows 7). My question is really about whether an alternative is necessary at all, at least in the short term.

          4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #342884 Reply

      plodr
      AskWoody Plus

      I’ll be watching your “ride” with interest. For me Windows 7 is the last version of Windows I’ll be running. I’ll use my android tablet to surf. It has a 10.1″ screen which is almost as large as the 11″ screen on the Acer netbooks we use. I have a case that doubles as a stand for portrait or landscape viewing and a full sized bluetooth keyboard.

      Since I make monthly images of all the computers, I think my husband will be okay doing his browsing on his netbook after January 2020 until I find a Chromebook for him. If he mentions the computer seems to be acting weird, I’ll restore an image. I’ll pull his desktop computer off the network. He can use the programs on it, it just won’t be on the internet. He’s been through this before when I pulled his Windows 98, 2K and XP off and told him he can still use them just not to surf.

       

      Perhaps sometime in 2020 you’ll consider having sections on ChromeOS and android for those of us who prefer those OSes over Windows and linux.

      Got coffee?

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #342893 Reply

        Microfix
        Da Boss

        Perhaps sometime in 2020 you’ll consider having sections on ChromeOS and android for those of us who prefer those OSes over Windows and linux.

        There are already with no doubt more to come once the ‘Whale is swallowed’ 🙂

        Other platforms – for Windows wonks

        ********** Win7 x64/x86 | Win8.1 x64 | Linux Hybrids x64 **********

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #343314 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          … and I hope to expand coverage there.

          There’s a significant, important niche for former windows users who go elsewhere.

          (Sent from my android phone. )

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #342903 Reply

      TsarNikky
      AskWoody Plus

      I feel confident that MS’s original “drop dead date” for Windows-7 updates will be extended, and likely for several more months.  Until MS has a long multiple-month track record of Windows-10 updates not trashing whole systems or disabling what used to be operational functions, why would anyone who values stability and reliability want to move to an OS that is less stable and less reliable?  As for Windows-10’s much vaunted “security enhancements,” that remains debatable.

      As a rhetorical question for MS:  Why didn’t you follow good programming protocols by using a modular structure?  Combining a lot of peripheral functions (gaming, touch-screens, cloud computing, synching, etc., etc.) to a business-oriented OS, made it needlessly complicated.  What happened to the concept of options?  If one doesn’t need gaming or touch-screen functionality, don’t install those modules.  Now, when an update is applied to, say, the gaming code and it “breaks” that code, the entire OS code no longer works.

      9 users thanked author for this post.
      • #343558 Reply

        I feel confident that MS’s original “drop dead date” for Windows-7 updates will be extended, and likely for several more months.

        You make many valid points. I think there is much in this; if enough of us non-corporate (I hate that euphemism “enterprise” ever since it came in, it just gets under my skin) users really start making some noise, it’s gonna be kinda hard for MSFT to continue bang their Win 10 gong over the din of a “Revolt in the Rear”.

        It may not work, but the only failure in life is not trying at all.

        /philosophy mode

        Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
        --
        "...All the people, all the time..." (Peter Ustinov ad-lib from "Logan's Run")

        • #343664 Reply

          TsarNikky
          AskWoody Plus

          It is not limited to just “us non-corporate,” users.  It includes all those corporate users who do not need all the folderol (read needless complexity) included in Windows-10 to support, among other things–gaming, touch screens, synching to the cloud, etc., etc.  This would probably include a large number of small- to medium-sized companies, and certainly any larger company without a dedicated in-house IT staff.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #342926 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      We are planning to install 8.1 on all of our Win7 office computers. We have only three different types of office computers. One of each will be upgraded, and then the rest slowly will. As for me personally, I probably will use Win7 beyond EOL.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #342996 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        GoneToPlaid: Good short-term to mid-term strategy, provided that is intended to gain time, first to prepare and then to carry out an eventual switch to a non-Windows OS, at least for those that take full care of other people’s computers and do not think that upgrading to Windows 10 is ever likely to be a good option.

        What one does with one’s own computer, at home and at one’s own risk, is another matter altogether, of course.

        Ex Windows 7, Group B. Now Group L&M (Linux & macOS)

    • #342928 Reply

      jeremy7079
      AskWoody Plus

      Change to win 8.1 to buy some time, any comments on that?

      • #342931 Reply

        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        That will only get you a few extra years, then you will be faced with the same problem. Things can change in a few years, but it’s not looking very promising right now as far as MS goes.

        Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Groups B & L

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #342934 Reply

          TsarNikky
          AskWoody Plus

          True, it gives one a few more years.   Definitely, right now, things are not looking good for MS.  Maybe, in the intervening years, MS will see the results of their poor business decisions and will learn from them.  They have, clearly, “erred and strayed like lost sheep.”  While branching out into other areas is often a good thing, one should never neglect one’s core product.  Regrettably, Windows-10 shows the results of that neglect.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #342955 Reply

            anonymous

            Maybe, in the intervening years, MS will see the results of their poor business decisions and will learn from them.

            Sorry but MS will never learn from their mistakes. It is time to switch to different OS or keep using the old MS OS that work well.

          • #342986 Reply

            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            While branching out into other areas is often a good thing, one should never neglect one’s core product.

            That’s just it.  Windows is no longer a core product at Microsoft.  It doesn’t even have its own department anymore, if there was any doubt about this.  Microsoft’s head is in the cloud these days, and from up there, all of the Windows users, and all of their problems, look like ants.

            Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

            4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #342953 Reply

      anonymous

      How to ride Win7 into the sunset

      I agree with this. I will be using Windows 7 for many more years to come. To quote you,

      “Ain’t broke, don’t fix.”

      . Many have seen what a mess MS has made with trying to improve Windows 10 and making it 100% worse. I still use my Windows Xp machines since several programs do not work in Windows 7 or newer. I have them online many hours a day and no problems with hacking or viruses since my firewall and anti viruses are on. Many sites have to use agent switcher to trick them to see a new OS and site loads fine after that. One of Windows Xp recently finally bit the dust with either the motherboard or power supply going. Might have to see if it is power supply and replace it if get some free time.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #342983 Reply

      Joulia.S
      AskWoody Plus

      İn full agreement with you Woody…

      Love your writing  style and expressive attitude.

      Always an entertaining  read !

      Regards.

      Windows 7,Home Premium 64 bit - Lenovo laptop
      Group A - Intel (R)Core i7 Processors -

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #342993 Reply

      anonymous

      Just upgrade your security and run unpatched, I’m doing this currently with 1709; turn it on and it always works. Ideas to explore:

      Basic essentials: Macrium Reflect, Windows Firewall Control, UMatrix and ad blocker. Data not on system drive.

      Concerned: Add Voodoo Shield, Sandboxie or a container for browser and email client. Comodo with Cruel Sister settings is worth trying.

      Tin foil hat: Basic essentials and virtual machine with Linux for internet activities.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #342999 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Perhaps I am wrong about this, but my understanding is that accessing the Web from a Linux VM is done through the Windows communications layer, so it is not safer than using Windows.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #343004 Reply

          anonymous

          It all depends on the vector.

          The worst malware is from a web ‘drive by’ such as a script or malware in an advertisement due to being a passive action. Sanboxing or a VM is going to catch that.

          Alternatively, common sense has to be bypassed by opening an attachment or downloaded file.

          It is the first point of contact that is the issue. From what I have read and experienced, most malware isn’t magic and or just appears. Malware is actually rare and often requires an effort to infect your system, as some of the forums IT guys say it used to be a good source of income but not anymore.

          Most malware will be picked up quickly by WD or third party, except for the new ‘zero day’ variety, which is what all the patching is for. But it still needs be accessed and executed.

          • #343039 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Anonymous: True enough. But all that you mention is what one can and should do to browse safely when using Windows directly. So, browsing the Web with Linux on a VM running on a Windows PC is not safer than using Windows directly. Please, notice my use of the comparative inflection of the adjective “safe” here and in my previous entry.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #343173 Reply

              anonymous

              Malware is tested in VMs, so we will have to agree to disagree.

            • #343196 Reply

              mn–
              AskWoody Lounger

              There being several kinds of VMs…

              Notably if you disable any paravirtualization features and accept the performance penalty, it does become somewhat safer.

              Then it becomes somewhat safer still if you dedicate a NIC directly to the VM from the PCIe layer so it doesn’t go through the host networking stack at all.

              Then there’s the extension that AMD was advertising a while ago, where you have memory encryption with different keys, and…

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #343340 Reply

              Ascaris
              AskWoody_MVP

              To me, the biggest security advantage of a VM is the ease with which one can roll back to a known good state.  I use VirtualBox, so that’s my point of reference, but the principles within apply to other VM software too.

              When I am done using the VM, I move the mouse pointer to the bottom of the screen, which brings up the VirtualBox toolbar overlay.  I click the X on the right side to close, and a menu appears.  Three options are shown with a radio button: Save the machine state, Send the shutdown signal, and Power off the machine.  There’s also a checkbox “Restore current snapshot ‘name'”, where ‘name’ is the name of the snapshot you started when you began the VirtualBox session.

              If you select “Power off the machine” and check the “Restore current snapshot” button, the VM will shut down immediately, so you can continue to use the host OS.  The next time you start your VM, it will by default start from the same point as with the last session, so if any malware had been introduced during that session, it would be gone.  Starting the VM from that point takes a few seconds (about two seconds on my G3 laptop with NVMe SSD, or about 15 seconds on my desktop with 7200 RPM HDD).  No need to boot up each time; it starts from whatever point you want it to.

              If you make a change that you want to keep, you can simply select “Save the machine state” from the VirtualBox shutdown menu, and it will save the current machine state as a new snapshot that you can restore next time.

              When you want to make a permanent change, first restore the current snapshot to get to a known good state, then make whatever change you wish, whether it be reconfiguring your UI, installing a trusted program, or whatever it is.  Once that’s done, save the snapshot (using the Snapshot menu option or by shutting down with “Save machine state”), and from that point forward, use that snapshot as your main one.

              You can use these options to provide far greater protection from malware than you can achieve with the bare-metal OS.  If you use “Power Off” with “Restore current snapshot” as your standard shutdown (it will be the default after the first time you use it), it will discard any malware that may have gotten a foothold, even if you’re not aware of it.  Just be in the habit of using external storage for any files you want to keep, since you know you’re going to roll back the machine state.

              I do this with my Windows 7 VM even though 7 is still supported.  If I didn’t intend to make any changes to the VM that I want to save, there’s no reason not to roll back.

              There is software that can approximate this with a bare-metal Windows installation, but it can’t be as fast and easy as with a VM. Rolling back to a known good state is no harder than saving with persistence, and you can use whichever option suits you at the time.

              When you consider that you can do all of this in a VM that lives in a window that allows you to keep doing whatever you wish in the host OS, it allows you to do any incidental browsing in the host, which provides a security advantage over a bare-metal installation where any such browsing will necessarily be done from the vulnerable OS, since that’s all you have at that moment.

              It’s true that this isn’t “automatic” security that happens without you having to think about it, but security isn’t automatic.  It always requires thought and planning, whether in fully-patched MacOS or Linux or long-unpatched Windows.  Security isn’t a quality that a given piece of software has or does not have… it’s a series of decisions made by everyone involved, from the devs of each program used to the end-user down there at the end of the chain who is using all that stuff.

              A VM is a powerful tool that allows for a lot of added security if you have a security mindset when you use it.  If you don’t have such a mindset, you’re not going to be safe no matter how up-to-date your operating system and other software may be.  It’s something that corporations have a lot of difficulty with– they try to keep all of their computers safe, but a workforce that doesn’t understand security (and generally, it won’t) is very difficult to protect from itself.  Even with a dedicated IT team to handle administrative tasks, which allows locking a PC down far more than is feasible with a standalone home PC, it’s hard to keep people safe if they insist on infecting themselves, as they so often do.

              Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #343434 Reply

              wdburt1
              AskWoody Plus

              This is very helpful to those of us who are intrigued by the idea but haven’t a clue how it works.

            • #343496 Reply

              anonymous

              It is an interesting project to undertake if you have the time. It can be frustrating, but I found rewarding. It is also good for ‘collectors’, as now I have Linux, latest Win10 and MacOS in VMs.

    • #343002 Reply

      anonymous

      I’m watching this project with interest.  I’m trying to hold out on Win 7 as long as I can, but corporate rules don’t allow for us running that after the January drop-dead date.

      However…

      Microsoft obviously wants to push all Win7 users into buying Windows 10 (the free ride is over). And many industry pundits say that you shouldn’t keep using your Win7 hardware anyway — it’s too old, and there’s much better stuff on the market.

      January 2020 isn’t the end of the line, for at least some hardware.  The blind spot for the industry pundits (as well as Microsoft) is the assumption that everybody wants/needs the latest features, as soon as they’re available.

      Even after Microsoft released Windows 10, it wasn’t hard to get machines shipping with Windows 7 (even if the licenses were Win 10, and considered to be “downgrades” by Microsoft), and there’s still plenty of machines out there where the hardware is contemporary with the 1507, 1511 and 1607 updates, and even a few at 1703.  In my opinion, there’s no hardware reason to replace those machines, and it’s still possible to upgrade them from Windows 7 (see below).

      Even for older hardware, upgrade isn’t beyond consideration, although with caveats. For business-grade laptops (not cheapo consumer rigs), if there’s no obvious stability or performance issues, and they haven’t been abused by rough use, I think it’s worth considering upgrade of machines dating back to approximately 2015, especially Lenovo ThinkPad and Dell Latitude. I’m not quite as enthusiastic about HP ProBook and EliteBook, because I know that HP was more aggressive in pushing Windows 10, from the beginning.  I do know that that during the GWX promotion, it was more frequent that HP machines were having problems with not having Win 10 versions of drivers (causing problems with upgrades), although I’m inclined to believe that that was more of a problem with HP consumer models.  Still, it may be that HP models are more likely to have problems with upgrades.

      Something else that also gets missed in the hype over latest features is that with Windows 10 itself (as with all Windows versions since Vista) is Windows 6.x, and the overall hardware requirements haven’t really changed very much. I won’t discount that there’s technical advances in CPUs, chipsets, video cards, etc., and that for some, those are important, and that applications often expect closer to the leading edge for their own hardware needs.

      @woody: The thing that Microsoft isn’t saying is that Windows 7 and 8.1 licenses can be activated in Windows 10.  This was a key part of the GWX promotion, that once Windows 10 was downloaded/installed, all it took (or was supposed to take) to activate was acceptance of the Win 10 EULA. And for users that didn’t want to do the upgrade in place, it was possible install a copy of Win 10 from a formatted hard drive, and then activate with a Win 7 or 8.1 license. Although the GWX promotion is gone, Microsoft is still accepting those licensees for activating Windows 10.    There’s a number of guides out there, for how to do it — one of the more prominent ones is from Ed Bott at ZDNet: https://www.zdnet.com/article/heres-how-you-can-still-get-a-free-windows-10-upgrade/

      Thus, all it takes is in getting the correct Windows 10 .ISO (32 or 64, language, release edition), and installing.  Heidoc.net all the downloads available (as well as Office .ISOs, as well), and a really useful downloadable tool for navigating the archives apart from a browser: https://www.heidoc.net/joomla/technology-science/microsoft/67-microsoft-windows-and-office-iso-download-tool .

      In my case, I’ve upgraded several machines (both Win 7 to Win 10, and Win 10 to more recent versions after deferral, and not using Windows “Check for Updates”), and both Pro and Home editions.  In my own work, I take things a step further by not physically burning the .ISO to external media — using Virtual Clone Drive, and then mounting that way is sufficient.

      I’m not suggesting that all older machines can or should upgrade to Windows 10.  There’s plenty of reasons to leave old machines on Windows 7.  However, if you have a machine that’s still working adequately, and the primary reason that you didn’t upgrade with GWX was that you weren’t ready to do so, you haven’t missed out on the ability to do so without having to pay Microsoft for a Win 10 license.  The capacity is still there, just that Microsoft isn’t advertising it.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #343319 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        You’re absolutely right about the mechanics of validation a Win10 license on a validated Win7 or 8.1 machine. But there’s a lot of confusion right now, especially among those with many licenses, whether those upgraded licenses are valid, if they ocurred after GWX ended.

        Individuals needn’t be concerned — Microsoft doesn’t want to bust you. But for companies with many machines, it isn’t so clear.

    • #343010 Reply

      pHROZEN gHOST
      AskWoody Lounger

      Linux runs fine on old machines.

      Win 7 may have issues in future when the Internet changes so much that browsers are no longer supported. Don’t say I didn’t warn. After all, there’s not much you can do now with Win 3.1 and the browsers it runs.

      Byte me!

      • #343020 Reply

        anonymous

        I would envision some catastrophic hardware failure before that happens.

      • #343180 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        Linux runs fine on old machines.

        Well, that’s all relative… especially compared to something like NetBSD.

        … … After all, there’s not much you can do now with Win 3.1 and the browsers it runs.

        Well sort of… you could make it run all kinds of things if you have the right toolchain and build from source. It’s just, same amount of work on the same hardware gets you much more if you don’t keep the Win 3.1 in there…

    • #343106 Reply

      Bravo, Woody! To lapse into my rusty and corrupt schoolboy Latin,

      “Ave, Heros, Magister et ex machinationibus software!”

      Or, as they say in Hawai’ian,

      “GEEVUM!” 🙂

      Aloha!

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "...All the people, all the time..." (Peter Ustinov ad-lib from "Logan's Run")

    • #343867 Reply

      Steve
      AskWoody Plus

      I have a custom-built computer running Windows® 7 Professional x64.

      It is not on the internet all the time. Yes, astounding as it may appear (| sound), I do not have broadband access back at the abode.

      I rely on AskWoody (.com) to let me know which Windows® updates to download. Those are downloaded onto a USB3 flash drive. The downloading computer is a Windows 8.1® Professional x64 (!) computer bought third-hand at a metropolitan Chicago pawn shop. This is also how I download that Windows® OS updates. I do not run any of them until Woody changes the MS-Defcon level to 4 or 5.

      The reason I scribe this response is because, just this past week, it was time for me to do my U.S. 2018 Income Tax.

      I fret that the genuine end-of-life for people running Windows® 7 will be when they attempt to compose their 202# income tax return and discover that the updated tax software or World-Wide Web site they have used no longer supports Windows® 7.

      I hope they would not have waited until mere days remained to file lest they really freak out.

      Anybody have any advice on how to manuever this – if it occurs?

      (Not to make you feel small or anything, but I filed both my Federal and state tax returns earlier today. I owed nothing, and I had no refund awaiting.)

      EDITED formatting

      Important links you can use, without all the fluff or sales pitch = https://v.gd/sdr28
      • #344389 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        We’ll find out for sure later this year, but it wouldn’t surprise me if TurboTax, in particular, continued to run on Win7 for a few more years.

        As for finishing your taxes already… yer a better man than I, Gunga Din!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #344246 Reply

      ve2mrx
      AskWoody Plus

      One point to consider when using Windows 10 on old hardware :
      No longer supported (networking) hardware!

      The reason is that everything that directly touches Internet can be attacked, including network drivers. There has been vulnerable network drivers in the past.

      It’s also the reason why running a virtual machine of any flavour on a Windows 7 host after sunset is not to be considered safe. Better install Linux and run your VMs on top. You can then run anything you want with more safety (assuming the system BIOS/UEFI, Management Engine, CPU, firmware and network drivers are safe).

      Overall, it’s safer to get a newer, still supported system with continuing updates.

      Special exception : Many (most?) AskWoody readers have the knowledge to check and ensure their important devices are still supported and kept up to date with security fixes. If you want to take that responsability, do it, knowing your machine’s ass is your hands!

      My family will upgrade to new hardware. Some of the 10 years old stuff will be repurposed and switched to Linux.

      Martin

      • #344537 Reply

        anonymous

        “Overall, it’s safer to get a newer, still supported system with continuing updates.”

        Yup…if you have the means; some of us are Seniors and broke. (i.e. 80% of seniors, according to US statistics.)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #344361 Reply

      anonymous

      I am somewhat concerned with Google Chrome support on Windows 7. Google stopped issuing updates for Chrome on Windows XP two years after its EOL, yes, but it simultaneously also ended support for Vista as well, even though it still had another year of extended support.

      I tried doing a Google search but I can’t seem to find the page explaining Google’s policy on when to stop supporting Windows versions. I seemed to recall reading somewhere that they only supported the last three or so Windows releases. I’m still not entirely sure what their policy about Windows 10 is. To my knowledge, they’re still releasing updates even for 1507 users (if they still cling on to that).

      Chrome doesn’t offer ESR releases to my knowledge the same way Firefox does (if they do it’s not for regular consumers cause I’ve never heard of it) so who knows for how much longer will Chrome be viable for Windows 7? I don’t run any Windows 7 PCs anymore, but at one point in time keeping things in sync over Chrome made it much easier to keep all of my devices harmoniously connected (the dream that Microsoft keeps trying to dream). For those who still want that connectivity, they’re probably going to have to abandon Chrome completely when it goes EOL on Windows 7 and use Firefox everywhere.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #344388 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Good point, but one alternative is to abandon Win7 and use a Chromebook!

        Chromebooks sync like a-ringin’ a bell.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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