• Your worst Windows 11 irritations — solved!

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    #2582389

    ISSUE 20.34 • 2023-08-21 PUBLIC DEFENDER By Brian Livingston Despite all the wailing and gnashing of teeth that Windows 11 users have directed at Micr
    [See the full post at: Your worst Windows 11 irritations — solved!]

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    • #2582392

      My Windows 10 22H2 Start Menu.
      Can I get the same on Windows 11 ?

    • #2582399

      Well, what’s so wrong with the Win11 interface?

      The menu lacks Win10’s folders to organize your apps and documents.

      Windows 11 has had start menu folders for 11 months:

      How to use Start menu folders in Windows 11 version 22H2

    • #2582390

      “It’s likely that we’re little more than a year away from being forced to run Win11, like it or not.”

      I don’t know about you, but I’m still in August 2023, so I’m a little more than 2 years away from October 2025

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2582411

      Maybe it’s just me but the calls from users to make Windows 11 look more like Windows 10 is tiresome.  I’ve adapted to Windows 11 features or lack there of.  My only issue is the inability to run Windows 11 o on my Windows 10 machines without jumping through hoops.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2582583

        I’m with you. I never liked anything about Windows 10 (nor 8/8.1 either); and all of my computers now run either Windows 7 x64 sp1 (the two pc’s that no longer connect to the internet) or Windows 11 22H2 (my new desktop and new laptop). Other than the annoying warnings in the event viewer logs pertaining to LSA, and Microsoft’s annoying assumption that everyone will (or should in their view) either use rapid boot, sleep, hibernation, or just leave their computers running non-stop, which if one does not, also produces annoying warnings due to the fact that the OS assumes it is connected to the internet at the same very moment that one pushes the power button; my only real complaint about Windows 11 22H2 is the fact that Microsoft did away with the desktop tool bar for the taskbar, which is no longer available (no I won’t install any third party application that will just cause problems sometime later after a monthly cumulative update).

        What really is their justification for doing away with the desktop toolbar, anyway? It very conveniently allows one to immediately, from the taskbar and the desktop home screen, go directly to any screen, folder, file, or whatever by following the popup menu and expanding flyout menus, instead of launching and sifting through a multitude of overlapping screens just to get somewhere.

         

    • #2582424

      Maybe it’s just me but the calls from users to make Windows 11 look more like Windows 10 is tiresome.

      There have been complaints about the UI for almost every version of Windows since 3.11. As you suggest, users rapidly adjusted.

      Since Windows 8, however, that has not been the case. 8, 8.1, 10, and now 11 not only had loud choruses of complaints, but third-party solutions to ameliorate them. In addition, Microsoft has done a terrible job explaining why the changes are better for its customers.

      There are many Windows users, such as yourself, who go with the flow. I’d venture that it’s probably the majority. Tiresome or not, the population of users who are dissatisfied with the evolution of the Windows UI just seems to keep growing.

      • #2582520

        I guess I’m one of those who like Windows 11. The only change I’ve made is with the right click menu in file explorer. It is true what one of your users said: there have been complaints every time windows releases a new version. I can remember all the wailing when Windows 10 first came out.

         

        If I have any complaints, it’s that phone link is buggy just like it was in Windows 10.

    • #2582436

      My solution to the irritating problems caused by Win 11, and Win 10 for that matter, is to rely more and more on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S4. I use Win 10 when I need to do extensive typing, letters mostly. I have also given up on the redesigned MS apps such as Weather, Money, and games. I still access my checking account and Ask Woody using Windows, but that too may not be the case much longer.

      Yes, I have looked at Win 11, and yes, I find nearly nothing I could call an improvement over Win 10, which I find to be no real improvement over Win 7.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2582441

      Forget minor, cosmetic changes and get StartAllBack.

      My very first task after upgrading to Windows 11 Pro, having been a happy user of StartIsBack++ with Windows 10 Pro.

      Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
      We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2582451

      Windows 8.1 Start Screen is still my favourite

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2582454

      All I really want is a way to taskbar items from stacking.

      I’m very hesitant to install anything that messes with the base operating system.

      I was using the free explorerpatcher for a long time. It solves a lot of irritations. Then the latest windows update ended up not being compatible with it and explore would crash over and over again before windows would finish loading. The only solution was to reinstall windows (keeping data). Nightmare!

      • #2582781

        Never Combine and Show Labels on the taskbar is back in the latest Insider Preview builds (Dev Channel) and seems to work great.

    • #2582456

      Mr Livingston, your article for the Win11 start menu issue comes across as a paid endorsement for StartAllBack. With so many freeware options out there, I was surprised to see you promote a paid product. The open source app Open Shell gives you the classic Win7 menu back on Win11 along with other fixes for zero dollars. Just saying.

      https://github.com/Open-Shell/Open-Shell-Menu

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2582530

        I prefer paid products as that ensures that there are paid developers fixing any bugs.  These third party menus DO interfere with updating so I don’t want to depend on the kindness of strangers and want to ensure that someone can keep food on their table as I enjoy their product and gain benefit from it.

         

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

      • #2582576

        (…) your article for the Win11 start menu issue comes across as a paid endorsement for StartAllBack.”

        That’s a strange take. I like to read about free AND paid products to make informed choices. And in fact, I’m happy to read reviews about paid products because I want to be sure it’s worth my money ! And besides, I use several open source programs (Thunderbird, LibreOffice, etc.) and they all ask for donations, and I do make donations because I enjoy their products. So, free or not, I end up paying money for the programs I use.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2582474

      I was surprised to see you promote a paid product

      The Newsletter does not restrict itself to free products. Reviewing a paid product does not constitute an endorsement. (We do not accept product placement articles, paid or otherwise, which are offered to us on almost a daily basis.)

      Should we discover that a contributor has accepted compensation from a vendor for a product review, that person will no longer be an AskWoody contributor.

      I’m confident that Brian purchased StartAllBack on his own. His report that he likes it is entirely consistent with our editorial policies.

      9 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2583212

        I have no affiliate relationships with anyone, and I receive nothing if you buy any product or service that I happen to mention.

        I can honestly assure you that I’ve downloaded and paid for StartAllBack myself, even before writing about it.

        There’s nothing inherently wrong with free software. But I agree with Susan Bradley that products supported by a payment or donation model are more likely to be upgraded in a timely fashion to keep pace with the OS. (The developer is not required to neglect their day job to make extensive code updates with no compensation.)

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2583280

          I agree with Susan Bradley that products supported by a payment or donation model are more likely to be upgraded in a timely fashion to keep pace with the OS.

          I concur.  Just two days ago after the “problematic” preview update KB5029351, I checked the properties of my StartAllBack installations on my desktop daily driver and my Windows 11 Pro-powered NAS.  The desktop installation was fine.  The NAS installation Properties > About had the hyperlinked message, “You need a license update”.  I clicked on the link, a “StartIsBack” web page opened momentarily, and the “You need a license update” transitioned to “Your license is activated”.

          That almost complete lack of hassle is worth $4.99 to me.  I use a number of utilities, all of which are paid versions save one, “Process Hacker“, because the authors don’t offer a paid version, but they do keep it updated.  I’m running v2.39.124.

          Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
          We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2583565

          Another option is to go open-source (free with optional donateware)
          Open-Shell (formerly Classic Start/ Shell by Ivo Beltchev) has been used here by members and myself for Windows 7/8/10
          Since then, the Open-Shell developers have provided what microsoft failed to, a familiar GUI with various customizations constantly being reduced by default in Windows.
          My own methodology was to revert to a previous version as I had saved and stored 2/3 versions previous to the current offline for use if needed.
          Fortunately, issues never happened although I think Win10 1909 posed a problem where the dev released an update within days/week of 1909 release to fix the issue.
          Never had an issue with Open-Shell. YMMV
          (disclaimer: i have no association with open-shell etc..just a happy user)

          Win8.1/R2 Hybrid lives on...
          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2582487

      The primary reason I haven’t moved to Windows 11 is a superficial one. Since my first days of Windows, I’ve had my taskbar running up the left side of the screen. This always seemed better because (1) it’s a better use of real estate, (2) you can make it as wide as you want in order to see open file names, (3) it works better with Extended Desktop and (4) it feels more natural, though that may be just because I’m used to it.

      StartAllBack claims it can “Move taskbar to top, left or right edges.” I’ve read elsewhere that this is buggy. I’m wondering if anyone has done this.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2582531

        StartAllBack claims it can “Move taskbar to top, left or right edges.” I’ve read elsewhere that this is buggy. I’m wondering if anyone has done this.

        Yes, and no, in my experience it’s not buggy.

        Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
        We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2582534

          The key (IMHO) is to delay patching to ensure that the vendors have time to deal with Windows 11 changes that may impact the menu helper software.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2584062

        StartAllBack is buggy. I tried it and I had all kind of problems. Why can’t Microsoft just let us move the taskbar like in other versions. I prefer the taskbar at the top.

    • #2582543

      I dislike change for the sake of change ( planned obsolescence) if it ain’t broke leave it alone, why introduce more problems! I found the easiest way was to dump Windows as my daily driver and move to Linux. Furthermore, I use Win 11 only as far as required for work to test our software and make sure the “updates” do not break it.  yes I do have machines running XP, 7, 10, 11 but only as test beds.

      I actually dumped MS when they began nagging in Win 7. I always feel sorry for the users ( ummm unsuspecting beta testers) when MS breaks things . Then again, not all of us are comfortable with command line use and/or tweaking the OS ourselves.

      I do agree with Susan – delay with new products/updates to make sure the bugs are fixed. Seems to apply to everything.

      I do have to say you folks are awesome in noting the issues that arise and noting products both free and paid that are helpful. I send folks here so they may have more insight into Windows.

      Thank you!

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2582871

      I am still using Windows 10. I have used Classic Menu, now Open Shell for many years and multiple versions of Windows and it works with Windows 11. I cannot imagine wanting to go through all those “options” when I can install Open Shell and have my familiar menu back!

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2582925

        Yep, IMO the benefit-to-risk analysis for Classic/Open Shell definitely favors sticking with it, especially with regular imaging.

    • #2583063

      Start menu replacement software really became needed after Windows 7 when Microsoft tossed the pinnacle of the Windows 95 style start menu/desktop design into the trash. That design was initially created from extensive user feedback and refined over time and is what really helped establish their dominate market position.

      But ever since then it seems Microsoft no longer has many competent UI designers/programmers nor anyone in management who really cares or has much respect for the end user anymore. Now it’s all about controlling your computer and monetizing you via their Windows as a Service (WaaS) model.

      So IMHO using start menu replacement software on such systems (Windows 10/11) is just putting lipstick on a pig. You still have to jump through a bunch of hoops to try to control the computer and minimize Microsoft attempting to monetize you, which only seems to be increasing with Windows 11 and in particular with their Edge web browser.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2583073

      I have the taskbar on the left of my dual monitor Windows 10 computer.  I’d rather sacrifice some horizontal rather than vertical real estate.

      Has been a nightmare battle to try and replicate this configuration in Windows 11.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2583294

      The primary reason I haven’t moved to Windows 11 is a superficial one. Since my first days of Windows, I’ve had my taskbar running up the left side of the screen. This always seemed better because (1) it’s a better use of real estate, (2) you can make it as wide as you want in order to see open file names, (3) it works better with Extended Desktop and (4) it feels more natural, though that may be just because I’m used to it.

      StartAllBack claims it can “Move taskbar to top, left or right edges.” I’ve read elsewhere that this is buggy. I’m wondering if anyone has done this.

      I have been a taskbar on the Left user since the beginning of Windows.  It is so simple to create Quicklinks Groupings on the taskbar with NO additional tools.  All Docs and Apps are ONE click away with NO additional tools.  Leave the Taskbar unlocked to see the Quicklink Separators for a better UI experience. With Win10 Pro, use Group policies to NEVER allow upgrading to Win 11.  That’s where I am.  Cheers to all the Left Toolbar Users who do not accept being Compliant NPCs.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2583322

      I also don’t like Win11.

      Window’s Server 2003 / Windows 7 was Microsoft’s pinnacle of performance and quality.  Since then, they’ve been progressively moving BACKWARDS.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2583327

        Server 2003?  If you would have said Server 2008R2 you would have a better argument but not 2003.

        I have helped too many forum folks back in the day on 2003.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

    • #2583330

      Server 2003?  If you would have said Server 2008R2 you would have a better argument but not 2003.

      I have helped too many forum folks back in the day on 2003.

      My mistake, I did indeed mean Server 2008 R2 and Wundows 7.

      (The number 2003, unrelated to Windows, was in my mind due to another conversation I was having while typing my post and I guess it just rolled of the fingers :])

    • #2583435

      your worst windows 11 irritations solved
      absolutely, I reverted back to a W10 image, sorted!
      Neutered, restrictive, dull and boring was my experience of that OS, good riddance. I’m sure the MSFT shills would disagree..

      Open-Shell FTW, it’s free and works well with all current in-support OS versions and legacy.
      Just updated recently

      Win8.1/R2 Hybrid lives on...
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2583490

      your worst windows 11 irritations solved

      I’ve stripped all the bloat and extraneous, useless-to-me “features” out of Windows 11 Pro, too.  I started with Windows 7 Ultimate, and have upgraded (no clean installs) to every succeeding Windows OS, keeping it lean and trim, blowing away any new useless-to-me “features”.

      With Windows 8 the first version of StartIsBack merely turned the Windows 7 start menu back on, and made the tile menu an option.  It did it without introducing any new processes, just enabling what Microsoft had disabled but left intact.  With StartIsBack+ for 8.1, they introduced some of their own coding for the start menu.  With StartIsBack++ for Windows 10, they stayed ahead of Microsoft’s game.

      Now with StartAllBack for Windows 11, they have outstripped Microsoft by offering more options, dealing with Search and File Explorer as well.  My Windows 11 looks, feels and performs like a souped up Windows 7, with better networking, security and stability.

      In other words, I don’t have Windows 11 irritations.  They can be eliminated.  I have no intentions of throwing up my hands in despair an reverting to Windows 10.  Windows 11 is a better OS once the useless-to-me “features” have been stripped out.

      Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
      We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

      • #2583514

        It’s good that you have the patience to strip out what you don’t want/need and that everything works well for you even with upgrades instead of a clean install. I have also always tweaked and cleaned Windows systems to keep them running lean and mean. But at some point a clean install is needed if you really want to get the best performance (and reliability) from a Windows system. Experience has proven this when comparing upgraded systems versus a clean install. It’s just the nature of Windows and how a lot of cruft builds up over time despite best efforts to clean and optimize everything.

        As to stripping out unwanted features or having to use third party Start menu software, I have lost all patience to deal with any of it anymore, even when Windows 8.1 was my primary OS with Classic/Open Shell. It’s one of many reasons I switched to Linux Mint. Now I no longer have to tweak anything or remove unwanted “features” or worry about updates breaking something/Microsoft changing something or continually trying to keep the system running lean and mean. Linux Mint is already a minimally designed and well optimized system out of the box, and where installing updates have no unexpected changes or need to run any post-update clean up or maintenance tasks. The system has built-in tasks that periodically run that keep things running lean and mean. So there is little need for me to do much of anything other than just use and enjoy the system.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2583535

          But at some point a clean install is needed if you really want to get the best performance (and reliability) from a Windows system. Experience has proven this when comparing upgraded systems versus a clean install. It’s just the nature of Windows and how a lot cruft builds up over time despite best efforts to clean and optimize everything.

          I have been dual booting Windows since Windows XP Pro.  I’ve also followed Fred Langa’s advice about a new installation of Windows; get all the settings and customizations in place, then create a drive image of this pristine installation as a guaranteed fallback point.  Dual booting offers the distinct advantage of comparing apples to apples, or oranges to oranges, because the OS comparisons are done on not just identical hardware, but the very same hardware.

          I’ve made such comparisons over the years to test my tweaks and configuration changes.  After all, if a tweak gains nothing, abandon that one and try something else, which I have done.  What I have found in the past couple of decades is that the quote above is simply not true.

          Experience has proven this when comparing upgraded systems versus a clean install.

          It has been my experience that when comparing a reconfigured and tweaked upgraded installation to a clean install on the exact same hardware, the reconfigured and tweaked upgraded installation wins, always, hands down.  Always.

          It’s just the nature of Windows and how a lot cruft builds up over time despite best efforts to clean and optimize everything.

          Task Scheduler takes care of all of my routine maintenance chores, such as running an extended Disk Cleanup every day at 11:00 PM.  I run HDCleaner weekly, as well as DISM and CBS log files after monthly updates.  The cruft can be very easily controlled.  The only cruft I have to deal with is when a feature update re=installs those useless “Special Folders”.  Those are very easily taken care of by importing a crafted file into the registry; poof.

          As to stripping out unwanted features or having to use third party Start menu software, I have lost all patience to deal with any of it anymore

          As for the tweaks and configurations, a feature update does not mess with them in the least.  I don’t have to spend any extra time redoing those.  StartAllBack stays in place; read #2583280 above.  We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don’t need anyone’s approval, and we don’t all have to do the same things.

          Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
          We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2583550

          Question – as I haven’t had a chance to delve into this.  Can you set up browsers to auto update?  Because I don’t like seeing browsers being gated and waiting for approval.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

      • #2583541

        Done all that also as a long-time habit and more with Windows !! over a few weeks.
        So the ‘lesser of two evils’ in support wins the day, Windows 10 ’til 2025 (possibly longer) with ‘OS behavioural’ firewall rulesets in place now and beyond EoS.

        Win8.1/R2 Hybrid lives on...
        • #2583549

          Done all that also as a long-time habit and more with Windows !! over a few weeks.

          My upgrade from Windows 10 Pro to Windows 11 Pro involved opening regedit as Trusted Installer and importing my crafted reg file to remove “Special Folders”.  StartAllBack took care of itself just by opening its Properties > About, clicking on the link “Your license needs an upgrade”.  A StartIsBack web  page opened, then the link became a statement, “Your license is activated.”

          Next I opened O&O Shutup10, selected “Revert changes” and restarted my PC.  That was it.  Nothing more needed to be done.  Everything else that I’ve put in place since Windows 8.1 remained untouched.  The Services I’ve disabled remained disabled.  It’s all good, looks like Windows 7.  No ads to be seen, no bloat to remove.  It didn’t take a few weeks, just a few minutes.

          I’ve done dual boot direct comparisons between upgrade vs. clean install on exactly the same hardware so many times that I can see absolutely no justification for the colossal waste of time that is a clean install.

          Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
          We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

          • #2583558

            Thanks for your advert but, still not going there, it’s as I said, neutered, restrictive, dull and boring compared to previous windows versions, may suit your needs well but, not for me (as a windows user from WFW 3.11)

            FYI: The installation was a fresh install, unpolluted by previous binaries on an unformatted clean SSD with imports for F/Wall, GP settings and firefox pref.js
            The rest was manually input or installed as per normal users to provide an accurate base for my own experience. With every day that passed, a 6th sense urged me to image restore, to the point I did, with no regrets.

            Win8.1/R2 Hybrid lives on...
            • #2583650

              The installation was a fresh install

              I knew that from this:

              Done all that also as a long-time habit and more with Windows !! over a few weeks.

              But there’s this:

              … unpolluted by previous binaries

              In my experience that is just an old wives tale.  The only “binaries” exist within the CPU and associated similar hardware.  Windows is compiled code written in a programming language.  That compiled code is translated into “machine language” and from there into “assembly language” and from there into the binaries (1’s and 0’s) that the CPU can actually use.  I’ve written simple programs in assembly as an exercise in one of my IS courses.  It’s tedious, yet still not binary.

              I’ve done dual boot direct comparisons between upgrade vs. clean install on exactly the same hardware so many times that I can see absolutely no justification for the colossal waste of time that is a clean install.

              In my experience, having done this over the past two decades+ (beginning with Windows XP, then a necessary clean install of Windows 7 Ultimate) on numerous different hardware configurations, never have I seen a clean install out-perform an upgrade in any way, shape or form.  It just ain’t so.  But bear in mind that all of my upgrades are performed on detritus-free clean-lean-and-mean Windows installations, kept that way by a regimen of Task Scheduler-run routine maintenance.

              As an aside, and in keeping with the incorrect notion of  “unpolluted by previous binaries”, the first version of StartIsBack for Windows 8 did nothing more than restore the functionality of the Windows 7 Start Menu that Microsoft left completely intact in Windows 8, just disabling it.  Also, many of the Windows 10/11 family feature updates do nothing more than enable code that already exists within the current installation.

              Again, in my experience, anecdotal though it may be, running a clean install is a colossal waste of time, personally confirmed by direct comparison on the same hardware.  It has long been my contention that, most likely, the main reason I have yet to have any hiccups with Windows Updates is that I am updating already-fully-updated-Windows installations which have their roots in Windows 7 Ultimate or Windows 7 Pro.

              Don’t forget the green text in my signature.

              Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
              We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

    • #2583557

      Can you set up browsers to auto update?

      Edge, Edge DEV, Firefox, Firefox DEV, and Chrome all update automatically on my systems. I don’t think Vivaldi does. I don’t have a Mac, so I don’t know about Safari.

      • #2583583

        Yes, that’s windows.  On my Mint I noticed it appears to be gated with the update manager program.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

      • #2583584

        MacOS – Safari updates through the Software Updates in the System Settings.
        You can choose:
        Screenshot-2023-08-25-at-6.01.44-PM

        FireFox updates are like Windows settings – choice of automatic or not.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2583579

      Never Combine and Show Labels on the taskbar is back in the latest Insider Preview builds (Dev Channel) and seems to work great.

      Never Combine and Show Labels on the taskbar is back in the latest Insider Preview builds (Dev Channel) and seems to work great.

      That would be fantastic. Can’t wait.

    • #2583599

      Yes, that’s windows.  On my Mint I noticed it appears to be gated with the update manager program.

      Yes, software updates are normally delivered via Mint’s official software repository when either manually checking via Update Manager or when it’s set to automatically check for updates. This is to provide a safe and centralized method of obtaining updates for software included with Mint and software installed from the repository (via the Software Manager application).

      However there are various other advanced methods to install software, such as by downloading tar files, deb files or RPM packages directly from a software source. As an example, for Firefox ESR I download the tar.bz2 file directly from Mozilla as soon as the latest version is available, then extract the files and install/update as detailed in my post here.

      However keep in mind that when installing software outside the repository like that future updates will not be displayed in the Update Manager. Instead updates will have to be done either in the application itself (if it supports it) or you need to stay aware of available updates and then download/install them yourself (my preferred method as it provides for the greatest level of control over updating).

      Or for some applications, such as Firefox, they have their own software repository or PPA (Personal Package Archive) that could be added as a software source for Update Manager to check. But I prefer to keep it simple and only use Update Manager for core OS updates and manually check/install updates for the few applications downloaded/installed outside the software repository (ex. Firefox ESR, Ungoogled Chromium, Thunderbird, VirtualBox and Citrix Workspace app/ICA Client).

      • #2583606

        I need to see if I can set the browsers to auto update all by themselves.  Browsers IMHO should update independently from the OS on all platforms.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

        • #2583649

          I have not tried to check for updates directly in Firefox (whether Linux or Windows) as I have always set the policy to disable auto-updates in the browser as I want full control over when to apply updates.

          But it’s also because I’m already aware of Mozilla’s release/update schedule via: https://whattrainisitnow.com and will download the latest update as soon as it’s posted to their FTP site, which is often a day or two before it’s available via the update mechanism in the browser itself (from what I have seen on some computers at work that also use Firefox and can check for updates since they do not have the policy set to disable auto-updates).

    • #2583614

      I prefer to clean up the start with very few items, and not really use it.

      Then use Auto Hot Key to launch applications etc.

      You can also use an app-file launcher. Plenty of good ones around.

      Say goodbye to the Start menu.

    • #2583657

      I prefer paid products [with] paid developers fixing any bugs.

      I agree, and think the same applies to freeware products with a donation model. I use an extension to Visual Studio Code to support PHP programming; the author’s premium edition costs $20. I can go without lattes for a couple of days, especially for something as astoundingly valuable as his extension.

      Speaking of which, his extension has been downloaded eight million times, a huge number when compared to other popular VSC extensions. If a mere 5% of his users coughed up the dough — well, you can do the math. I talk to the guy regularly and was sad to learn that he’s not yet a millionaire (at least from the extension). That is so wrong.

      So if a $10 product scratches your itch from a Windows 11 irritation, skip the latte.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2583986

      Well, so for regular customisation of Windows, there is a plenty of 3rd party programs, but I would not recommend to use them until you know are you doing.

      Nevertheless thanks for the summary, although I would not recommend average home user to download and run SW from the GitHub.. Its good for developpers, but for home users I dont think that is very safe.

      Dell Latitude 3420, Intel Core i7 @ 2.8 GHz, 16GB RAM, W10 22H2 Enterprise

      HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      PRUSA i3 MK3S+

    • #2586573

      I prefer paid products as that ensures that there are paid developers fixing any bugs.

      Wow..you must be rich. I am poor and have no money to spend on fix MS mistakes. This is why I use open source whenever I can.

      I dislike change for the sake of change ( planned obsolescence) if it ain’t broke leave it alone, why introduce more problems! I found the easiest way was to dump Windows as my daily driver and move to Linux.

      Agree. Changes seems to lead to issues especially when talking about MS. With MS, anything they acquire or buy gets a death sentences. IE Skype, yammer etc…

      I also don’t like Win11. Window’s Server 2003 / Windows 7 was Microsoft’s pinnacle of performance and quality. Since then, they’ve been progressively moving BACKWARDS.

      100% agree. Wait. 200% agree with you. Server 2003 and WIndows 7 were the best OS that MS made. Now everything is crap. This is why I move to Linux.

      • #2586578

        I’m not rich, I just realize that nothing is “for free”.  Someone needs to put food on their table.

        As to the best operating system was Server 2003.   You lose the argument completely by saying that. Memory leaks.  Scheduling rebooting was normal for that platform.  Make a better argument because making 2003 the best has zero merit.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2586662

        With MS, anything they acquire or buy gets a death sentences. IE Skype, yammer etc…

        Reports of Skype and Yammer‘s death are greatly exaggerated.

    • #2586593

      Another irritation in W11 is WinRE update failures for some..
      Although, help is at hand, as microsoft have documented KB5028997 which contains a manual walkthrough on how to expand the WinRE partition manually, by their recommended 100mb.

      Another irritation solved..

      Win8.1/R2 Hybrid lives on...
      1 user thanked author for this post.
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    Reply To: Your worst Windows 11 irritations — solved!

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