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  • “Zoominfo Notification”

    Home Forums AskWoody support Questions: Browsers and desktop software “Zoominfo Notification”

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      • #2290006
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        Not sure where to post this, maybe someone can point me elsewhere if appropriate…

        Just received a detailed email (in Spam) from sender in topic title informing me that they are collecting my personal information for marketing purposes.  Subject line reads, “Notice of personal information processing.”  There are links in the message that supposedly offer an opt-out.

        I’m assuming that the best move is to ignore this completely and not click on any links.  Comments?

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2

      • #2290013
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Do you recognize the sender? Do you recall subscribing to that service?

        If it is service or subscription, which you do not use anymore, I recommend to sign out / opt out.
        Using your personal information can mean/lead to increasing number of emails incoming to your email inbox )spam folder to be exact). It can be harmless, but it can become very annoying to receive 10 emails per day which you do not read. Important messages can be drown easily.

        I recommend to get rid of all subscriptions you do not use, marketing emails content small link on the bottom of the page to unsubscribe.
        If sender is MSFT, Google, Apple or other tchnological giant, its up to you whether you want to continue to use them.

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2290014
        PKCano
        Manager

        If you click on anything, you may infect your PC.
        If you opt-out you simply tell them your email address is valid (to use/sell).
        Mark it as spam – then delete it. Then delete it from the trash.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2290015
          Slowpoke47
          AskWoody Plus

          If you click on anything, you may infect your PC. If you opt-out you simply tell them your email address is valid (to use/sell).

          That was my thought as well.  Thanks for confirming.

          Linux Mint Mate 19.2

      • #2290016
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        Do you recognize the sender? Do you recall subscribing to that service?

        Never heard if it before.  No idea where this entity got my email address, as I try to be careful with personal info.

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2290019
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          According to Zoominfo webpage, they are clearly marketing company.
          Several times I recieved telephone call offering me medical equipment and other things I never asked for, so I always ask where they took my number, then immediately tell them to delete my number from the database. And since the call is recorded, they must obey my wish.

          In the past, these companies could forward your personal information to others – but now with GDPR it is not possible.

          So if I want some service no more, I try to unsubscribe regullary, so they cant use my email/phone no more. Sometimes I click “unsubscribe” in email that I recognize, sometimes I log to online account and terminate that account.

          I would never click link, that I dont recognize or I didnt subscribe. In that case, this approach:

          Mark it as spam – then delete it. Then delete it from the trash.

          is the best way. Thanks @PKcano, I didnt realize, that clicking the link says your email is valid..

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

          • #2290022
            PKCano
            Manager

            In the US, we are not protected by GDPR rules. “Unsubscribe” tells the sender your email is valid, then they can use it. They are not obligated by your wishes, statements.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2290057
              zat_so
              AskWoody Plus

              They are not obligated by your wishes, statements.

              I would argue that they are, morally. But this is marketing, where, like love and war, all is fair.🙄

              • #2290058
                PKCano
                Manager

                There are no morals in marketing.

                2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2290109
                wavy
                AskWoody Plus

                If one has already ASKED for an email subscription after having determined that the source is reliable there should not be a problem asking to be unsubscribed. It mostly works. 😉

                🍻

                Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2290060
          anonymous
          Guest

          @Slowpoke47

          As Doriel has said above, Zoominfo is an information company for marketing. Do yourself a small favor, and Google the term “zoominfo” (without the quotes, of course) and look at the results. I just did, and I paid particular attention to the third listing for their main web site. The first two listings are ads because they have the word “Ad” in bold at the beginning of the listing. In the actual, non-ad, listing on Google, I found the following words:

          “We combine the leading business contact database with best-in-class tech to pinpoint your customers & deliver the intelligence you need to hit your number.”

          So, my guess is that they may have bought your email address from someone else you’ve done business with and whom you didn’t somehow tell NOT to share or sell your info. The other possibility is that they may have paid a service to “spam” emails out to every possible address within a certain domain (like xyzmail.com, for example) hoping to “get a live one” to use for a lead of some kind.

          Either way, to me it sounds like the email may be on the up and up, but you never know these days. The best bet might be to go to their website and click on a link that’s probably towards the bottom of the main page that says “Privacy” or “Opt out”. That will lead you to the company’s privacy policy and that policy will tell you how to opt out from getting any more marketing from them and how to tell them to not sell your info to other entities. It will also tell you just what info they collect and just how they will use it.

          Companies are nowadays required to honor any type of “Don’t sell my info” or opt-out requests or face heavy penalties. However, just because they’re required to doesn’t mean they will always honor one’s request, unfortunately. YMMV.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2290099
        Bill C.
        AskWoody Plus

        If I get spam like this, I will go and look at my cookies cache to see if that entity is there. If there is a cookie, I will delete it and any others I do not recognize that are dated with the same creation date or the same ‘last accessed’ date.

        Additionally I use HTTPS Everywhere, the Facebook container, Adblocker Ultimate, and the Malwarebytes browser extension, as well as the Google Analytics Blocker. I also have tracking protection in Firefox set to strict. I rarely get truly unknown spam. My ISP however also blocks some valid emails from sources with their own algorithms, even though I have asked to get email from them and mark them as NOT SPAM, so I check the spam folder whenever I access my phone email. Marking them as OK just does not work. That usually ramps way up in advance of silly season in the US, a/k/a elections. I do know some of it is based upon which commercial emailer some vendors and groups use.

        Using the blockers can be a hassle at times as you have to disable certain ones for some websites, but that is largely rare now, I know what to look for, and it is well worth the effort to browse quickly. HTTPS is especially good with popups.

      • #2290205
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        We take online privacy seriously and anything Google is off limits.  A year ago when moving from Win7 to Linux, we replaced Chrome with Firefox and closed my gmail and Google accounts.  We use Invidio as an end run around the intrusiveness of Youtube.  We use mapsdirections.org rather than Google maps and Duckduckgo instead of Google search.  On those rare occasions that some tentacle of Google shows up, we delete that cache and the cookies immediately.

        Of course, multiple other entities do what they can to “harvest” personal info, and we try to nip them in the bud.  How would you feel if, when making a purchase in a bricks-and-mortar store, they wouldn’t let you leave without supplying name, rank, and serial number, etc?  Firefox is set to delete cookies and cached site data upon closing, but I usually do that manually during a browsing session if I have visited sites that plant them.  Although FF sends “do not track” requests to visited sites, that appears to be useless, as personal info is valuable online currency.  Google did not become one of the highest-capitalized companies in the world by giving away its services.  We do recognize that maintaining a website costs money, however, and contribute to quite a few sites that provide free content, including Linux.

        We get regular email blasts from Duckduckgo on the topic of privacy, and the latest one arrived yesterday with several helpful links, this one included:  https://www.komando.com/kims-column/stop-amazon-from-sharing-private-info/747110/

         

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2344716
        anonymous
        Guest

        My problem with the zoominfo example, to use an analogy, it’s like protection payments to organized crime saying “You can choose to not pay us to protect you, but who knows what will happen to you if you don’t”, knowing full well that they encourage un-safe things to happen to you/your property if you don’t pay them. So basically this company is saying  “We have your info by scraping the internet, give us more of your info and we won’t sell your info, don’t, and who know what will happen with your info, you don’t know how much info we have on you, you may still be anonymous, you may not be”. It’s like the “do not call registry” about a decade ago in Canada, you don’t know if your info is out there, you’re encouraged to call a line to add you to a “do not call list”, and the list was made available for a fee, as a list of people you weren’t allowed to call. I’m sure there were alot of legit companies, but it was just a cheap way for other companies outside of Canada to get a huge list of contacts. There were all sorts of stories in the news about people that went from no calls to many calls on every number they gave, even the ones that were previously unlisted. Any company, etc. outside of Canada couldn’t be touched by the law, it was a joke.

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