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  • AceOfAces

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    • in reply to: Patch Lady – are you seeing issues with KB4556799? #2265064
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      I have installed the update on three machines (an old ASUS X51RL laptop – running Windows 10 Pro 32-bit, a custom built AMD Ryzen 5 APU based desktop and my daily driver HP 15 ay049nv). None of them had any issues. Only the daily driver had HP Support Assistant installed and HP Connection Optimizer. The only issue I’ve encountered with it is breaking when I’ve upgraded to the May 2020 Update (although the  HP Support Framework still works. I can go to HP’s website and use the included batch download tool). All of them are prett much stock, with no tweaks applied.

      KMODE Exception sound to me that there’s a bug with a kernel driver. I wouldn’t be surprised that Riot Vanguard (Valorant’s anti-cheat driver. Yes.)would cause issues as well (it’s beta, but does it really have to run every time the system starts?)

      On a minor note, I noticed that the Windows Update offered a new driver for Realtek HD Audio (6.0.8940.1). Not sure if it’s due to me having an OEM driver or it’s due to Windows finding a compatible driver for 2004, but I wouldn’t be surprised. Sometimes, newer OEM drivers find themselves on Windows Update.

      • This reply was modified 2 days, 10 hours ago by AceOfAces.
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well… Looks like SmartScreen in Chromium Edge blocked the test site. Somebody caught up with it. So…

      Attachments:
      in reply to: May 2019 Patch Tuesday arrives #1622311
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well, another Intel security bug was found. https://www.chromium.org/Home/chromium-security/mds

      Looks like it’s another Spectre type of attack (if I read the info I found correctly so far, it attacks the buffers to retrieve sensitive data. Still reading.) and Microsoft added them in to all May 2019 patches (I can confirm it in 1903’s patch notes). Intel is rolling out microcode as well.

      And just when you thought this would be over soon…

      Quick Edit: Quick clarification: This is a cocktail of 4 bugs in the processors:

      CVE-2018-12126

      Store buffers on some microprocessors utilizing speculative execution may allow an authenticated user to potentially enable information disclosure via a side channel with local access.

      CVE-2018-12127

      Load ports on some microprocessors utilizing speculative execution may allow an authenticated user to potentially enable information disclosure via a side channel with local access.

      CVE-2018-12130

      Fill buffers on some microprocessors utilizing speculative execution may allow an authenticated user to potentially enable information disclosure via a side channel with local access.

      CVE-2019-11091

      Uncacheable memory on some microprocessors utilizing speculative execution may allow an authenticated user to potentially enable information disclosure via a side channel with local access.

      The first three are considered Medium in severity. The last one is low.

      • This reply was modified 1 year ago by AceOfAces.
      3 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Patch Lady – so I don’t get it #401999
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      I sometimes wonder if the development team is spread too thin and they have a hard time to debug all versions of Windows. They have to maintain tens of versions of Windows 10 on about 5-10 devices, they have to also maintain Windows 7 and 8.1. And that assumes that they have to maintain one architecture for each. And have to release updates monthly. How can more QA help debug updates for all SKUs if there are too many in the first place? I know that the team is large, but there is a limit to everything. I think they should have streamlined the versions they maintain so they can focus on debugging them, otherwise, any QA testers added will provide marginal improvements. Having one “current” release and one “LTS” release (and maybe an ESR release for Volume License users that have really sensitive systems). Maybe have Win 7, 8.1 and 10 ESR on a separate Patch Tuesday as well.

      Aside from this, the issue with AV programs breaking with kernel changes is rather absurd today. It’s still not addressed. Both Microsoft and the AV makers need to talk and figure out what’s needed. First, PatchGuard [edited] AV makers, then the under usage of ELAM and AMSI, now this? Now it’s getting ridiculous at this point.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well… https://www.thurrott.com/google/194556/microsoft-confirms-it-will-adopt-chromium-for-microsoft-edge

      It will be available on all supported Windows versions and MacOS.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hmm… I actually have mixed feelings about moving to Chromium. On the one hand, EdgeHTML is pretty solid (although development is slow). Edge itself is pretty fast and the sync capabilities work pretty well. And the JS interpreter has a pretty good potential for HTML5 games. On the other hand, Chrome has practically become the Web Renderer. I guess it makes perfect sense to simply use a well-maintained engine in the long run since they can focus on making features for the browser.

      But if Microsoft sticks with Chakra (that’s the JS Interpreter of Edge) and replaces V8 (assuming that Blink and V8 are separate from the code base of Chromium) with that, it could potentially make it pretty unique. There is a version of NodeJS that uses MS’ interpreter and Chakra itself is open source, so it could be a good candidate. Add in NodeJS to UWP and it would only take a few minutes to convert a web app to UWP.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      Yikes. And I sat for a day to get the (no longer) RTM build. It installed fine through Windows Update (I usually use either the Media Creation Tool or the Windows 10 Upgrade Tool) and I haven’t noticed that bug. My best guess as to what could be (based on the pretty shallow dive I did to build 17133) are possibly kernel side. There’s a new entry in Windows Defender, which covers protections for the device (Secure Boot, TPM, etc.). In there, there’s an option to isolate the kernel (could it be the protection against Spectre/Meltdown or Hypervisor-based Code Integrity?). Maybe it could be something else in the kernel…

      Attachments:
      3 users thanked author for this post.
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well… I installed the patch on my only machine (I know, but I have far fewer things that can break and I am cynical at the moment). So far, the patch went smooth and I haven’t noticed any issues. Not even a slowdown (although, I have installed 8GB of RAM on my laptop in dual-channel mode, so any loss was mitigated or lessened). I’m keeping an eye out for any issues.

      Something of interest: HP has released a BIOS update a month a few days after the Intel ME fiasco (F.40 on my machine) which is supposed to improve the firmware’s security, but when I ran Microsoft’s utility, there isn’t any protection in the hardware yet for the CPU vulnerabilities. My best guess was to fortify the ME chip or fixed some security issues that the BIOS had.

      in reply to: Intel Firmware Security Bulletin issued #147106
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      HP has released the firmware update for their notebooks (I don’t know if they released them for all of the affected ones, but my laptop has the update on the driver downloads). The date of release (according to the Support Site) is October 17, 2017. This comes with firmware version 11.8.50.3390 (SVN 3) and the ME driver version 11.7.0.1043. There’s also an update to Intel’s Trusted Execution Technology as well.

      in reply to: Throttling CPUs in Win10 Fall Creators Update, version 1709? #143824
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      I wonder if a post-install script ran a few days after installation of the update. It took a while to replace the power plans with the slider (and the Battery Sense feature was added to the slider as well). Oddly, HP’s power plan (which was active on my laptop at the time the change was applied) was left in there. Maybe the OS checks if the system is a mobile device first?

      The only slowdown I noticed was due to heavy apps sending a good chunk of RAM used to the hard drive. That laptop has 4GB of RAM and it was present on 1703 as well.

      Quick Edit: Looks like that some background apps are indeed moderated the OS (on my side anyway. Although the tab writes “Limited Power” (rough translation from Greek, take it with a grain of salt)). Most of them were simply sitting on the background (such as the Logitech SetPoint, Discord, some of Microsoft Edge’s processes, etc.). Maybe there are some criteria for it?

      EDIT #2: Found this detail on the Microsoft Document @b linked:

      Devices that have the High Performance, Power Saver, or any “OEM Recommended” power plans will not be disturbed during the upgrade process. If a user has any of these power plans selected when they upgrade to Windows 10 version 1709, there will be no change to their power plans, and they will not see the slider UX. Users can still configure their power plans in the same way they could before upgrading.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      Linux year coming finally? ?

      I don’t think so. If NSA doesn’t stop pilling up vulnerabilities, Linux may have it the worst, since they can patch their systems (the compiler for Linux is publically available, right?) and stay silent until a vulnerability is exploited (assuming that nobody notices them). I have already concerns with Linux and the recent kerfuffle is the icing on a really bad cake.

      AceOfAces
      AskWoody Lounger

      To be honest, Windows 10 left me with mixed feelings and thoughts. It’s like Microsoft’s taking one step forward, two steps back. Introduce a new platform that could work on multiple types of devices? You got my interest (especially since HTML5 programs and games can access some native APIs). No option to remove inbox apps that you replaced with better ones (both Win32 and UWP)? Well, s***. A way to simplify installations of programs and games? This is great. Advertisements on the shell? No thank you. Office Hub (assuming you use Microsoft Office)? That’s neat (although  don’t use it often since a. I can find the files easily and b. it updated Get Office (and they didn’t change the title at all) sneakily to replace it, so most people removed it anyway). I do like Live Tiles, but I don’t like Tiles as advertisement. I want the Tiles to be informative (as at the glance info). The model they have for monetization is going against Windows’ design. I’d rather buy for upgrading to a newer version and don’t deal with ads, rather than getting free updates and have to deal with them. I think that it would be a better idea to pay for what modules you want. It’s cheaper to get what you want at least.

      I may have a developer license for publishing to the Windows Store, but I’m really hesitant to use the advertisement platform they offer. And in a few years time, they may have to completely reboot the OS (assuming they give a dime). And this will be a big crater there…

      Edit: pls note Lounge Rules

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