News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Ascaris

    Forum Replies Created

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,154 total)
    • Author
      Posts
    • in reply to: CCleaner wipes Firefox extension settings #2286132
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      What the EULA says and what the program actually does are distinct things. The argument you are making is akin to saying that Windows 10 anti-telemetry programs like ShutUp10 don’t work because the Windows EULA still says they may collect your data, and because the options within Windows to turn on full telemetry are still there. ShutUp10 disables the telemetry, but it cannot alter a legal agreement to which it is not a party, including the one between the PC owner and Microsoft. Indeed, MS does still have the permission it granted itself to take all of your data even after you install ShutUp10… but permission and ability to actually do something are not the same.

      The same is apparently true of the portable version of CCleaner, which was not made portable by Avast, but by a third party. The portable apps version apparently downloads CCleaner from an approved source at installation time, and applies the tweaks to it at that time. It evidently does not change the menus of CCleaner, nor does it change the EULA you must accept to use CCleaner (to try do that would be fraudulent).  Avast still has permission you granted it to plunder your data, but it no longer (if the program works as reported) has the ability to do so, permission or not.

      That’s assuming the program works as reported. I don’t have any experience with it.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Microsoft and TikTok – a match made in Clippy heaven #2285997
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      It has not really seemed that MS was all that interested in the consumer market for some time, other than for Xbox.  The level of abuse they’ve dished out to consumer-level users of Windows doesn’t scream “We value you and want to keep you as customers.” You don’t make valued customers beta test their own paid software on behalf of corporate customers, nor do you put ads or other monetization efforts into software that isn’t free (as in beer). It has looked to me, since the start of Windows 10, that MS had one last use for Windows consumers, and that was to use them as a stepping stone to the mobile market (where they would be much more interested in consumers).  Once that failed, it just seems as if consumer Windows is moribund, with MS focusing everything on the enterprise sector.

      I don’t really know, or particularly want to know, what TikTok is, other than that it has something to do with vapid, mindless video content, and I had no idea MS was involved with them until just now, but it is a bit strange to me. I am not sure what their interest is, but I do know that there’s a good chance that TikTok is on borrowed time from this point forward.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Asus motherboard P8Z68-V Pro SATA connections #2285988
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      Is there a ! symbol next to the entry for the Marvell controller in Windows’ Device Manager? It could be that you need to download a driver for the Marvell from Asus or another source.

      I have a motherboard quite similar to yours in my desktop. It’s the Asus P8P67 (Deluxe), and it too has a secondary Marvell SATA adapter. When I had two SATA SSDs, I connected them to the two Intel SATA ports (SATA III, 6GB/s) and my rust spinner and DVD-RW drive to the Intel SATA II ports (3GB/s). The HDD is decently quick for a HDD (7200 RPM 3TB), but still not enough to saturate the SATA II bus speed, so I didn’t bother to enable the Marvell.

      When I added a third SSD, I enabled the Marvell controller and connected the new SSD to that. I’m using Linux, so if it is a Windows driver issue, it would be different, but after I turned on the Marvell, it just worked without missing a beat.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      It’s not that something is wrong with my setup or anything like that… I can’t see the changelog because I am not using Mint.  The package in question is a Mint specific thing, and while I did search for a changelog online, I didn’t find one.

      I do have a Mint test environment on my G3, but that was the same PC I was using to write the message.

      The distro I use, KDE Neon (which is also based on Ubuntu LTS, like Mint, but currently it’s 18.04) has one package that appears to be KDE’s version of that package, neon-settings.  It’s received a bunch of updates lately, though it is my guess that it has to do with the upcoming rebase of Neon to 20.04.

       

       

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      I just tried booting Windows 10 from the GRUB menu (on the G3) with secure boot enabled, and it worked just fine with the most recent GRUB update, FWIW. I’m using KDE Neon, based on Ubuntu 18.04 currently.

      If you have secure boot off or if you only want to load Linux, apparently, you won’t see the issue. The problem I saw described only seems to be an issue with secure boot and booting Windows.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Linux newbie: dual boot questions #2285541
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      And my desktop can’t do it.  It takes a secure boot capable OS and UEFI to make it happen. Windows 7 can’t be booted via secure boot even with a UEFI that is capable of it, and no secure boot is possible regardless of the OS on PCs like my Sandy desktop.

      A lot of people think UEFI boot and secure boot are the same. Clearly, they are not. UEFI booting is required for secure boot, but non-secure boots are quite possible within UEFI too.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      • This reply was modified 2 days ago by Ascaris.
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      I take it you are using Mint?

      If so, it is a legitimate, if perhaps somewhat controversial, part of Mint. It’s in one of these system adjustments that Mint blocks snap packages by default, a decision that some individuals think is absurd, while others (like me) can see the rationale.  It’s only a change in the default… users can enable snap capability if they want it. That’s the point… if they want it, they can turn it on, accepting the reduced control over updates this implies, but it won’t just happen without the user doing anything as it would in Ubuntu.

      I can’t see the changelog for the package in question, so I can’t tell what you mean about Firefox telemetry.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      in reply to: Linux newbie: dual boot questions #2285469
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      Watch out for any Partition Limits on Windows 7/Linux Dual boot configurations as there’s a Limit of 4 Primary Partitions for any NON UEFI enabled dual booting configurations.

      That is a limitation of any MBR setup, but you can create an extended partition and add logical partitions to that without an issue. Linux will happily boot from a logical partition, even though Windows can’t.

      I Had issues installing Linux Mint alongside Windows 7(Pro) on an HP Probook that came with the OS factory Downgraded to Windows 7 Pro from Windows 8 Pro, so the UEFI was set to legacy BIOS mode and I had to remove one Windows Created partition on that laptop to get the Linux Mint(19.3) installer to even offer me the option of installing Linux Mint alongside Windows 7 on that Probook(4540s) laptop.

      If you are only going to have four partitions, you can make them all primary, but adding another one means you would have to change one of them to an extended partition with a logical partition inside. This was apparently beyond the scope of the guided installer, but it may have been possible to do with the manual option “something else.” It’s been a while since I had to wrangle MBR partitions, and I don’t remember whether the Mint installer would be able to do that or if it would take something more powerful (like Gparted from the live session) to make this work.

      I’m averse to change for the sake of change, but the change from legacy BIOS boot to UEFI boot and  the change from MBR partitioning to GPT partitioning were changes that I embraced and appreciated from the first time I encountered them. I know there was some fear and loathing of both GPT and UEFI among some, with claims that they were the stuff of nightmares and that there was no reason to abandon the old BIOS/MBR setup, but UEFI and GPT were legitimate improvements. If your four partition disk had been GPT, the Linux installer would have had no problem adding more partitions.

      Also I’d like to know when UEFI was adopted and first used in laptops as I have a Samsung Series 3 laptop(Windows 7) that’s using an Intel Sandy Bridge generation Intel core i7 quad core processor that had in its BIOS some wording that Mentioned UEFI settings and I had thought that UEFI was not used or available for laptops based on Sandy Bridge generation Processors(?).

      My Sandy Bridge desktop uses UEFI, and when I had Windows 7 (x64) on it, I had it performing a UEFI boot, with all of the disks in the system using GPT.  Laptop or desktop shouldn’t make any difference here.

      Some people at this site have said that Win 7 usually came set up as MBR/legacy boot even on PCs that were capable of UEFI booting. I never had any reason to check on the systems I saw that had 7 preinstalled, and I never owned a PC that came with 7 personally, so I can’t say one way or another based on my own experience.

      Starting with Windows 8, MS began requiring OEMs to ship Windows with Secure Boot enabled, which only worked with UEFI boot mode, so legacy mode could not be used any more beyond that point. My Sandy desktop has UEFI, but it is not able to perform a secure boot, even if the OS can.

       

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      There’s Pinephone or the Purism phone.

      Personally, I just choose the easier way… no smart phone or tablet. People got by for a whole lotta years (self included) without one… no reason to think it can’t be done now.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      in reply to: ‘BootHole’ attack impacts Windows and Linux #2284210
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      From my reading, it sounds like Paul’s right here. There can be non-Linux related reasons to use GRUB to boot on a system with Windows, but it’s not by any means common.

      If you mean that it would be possible to install GRUB (quietly, without alerting the user) specifically to bypass secure boot before chainloading Windows… well, that’s certainly not described in the ZDNet article, and I don’t know how feasible it is.

      If you’re not using secure boot, this does not affect you even if you are using GRUB, though it only means that the lowered security of bypassing secure boot with this exploit is the normal situation (with all that implies).

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      in reply to: ‘BootHole’ attack impacts Windows and Linux #2284208
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      I received a GRUB security update yesterday (July 29, 2020) on Neon (Ubuntu 18.04 base). I didn’t know exactly what it was for, but I do now! Can’t beat the speed of a security update that arrives before the warning of the vulnerability.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Windows 10 turns five years old #2284156
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      I’ve addressed the dark side for consumers within my blogs. Some other MVP and me, we are collecting cases, where Microsoft Accounts are deactivated from Microsoft for some users (it was a machine learning program that made this decision). There is no way for an affected person to gain his Microsoft account back – the user is facing a ‘digital dead’ in Microsoft’s universe.

      Another reason not to create or use such an account in the first place.

      I do wonder if at some point MS will make it mandatory to use Windows at all. I’d be surprised if they didn’t, really. It’s been clear that they want control of machines they don’t own, and this would be another step in that direction.

      I know a lot of people have been hoping that MS would eventually get the message and fix the actual issues with Windows (which can be summed up with a single acronym: WaaS) rather than churning out feature update after feature update with lots of features no one asked for, but none that users have been demanding, asking for, and begging for over all five of the years that Windows 10 has been around.  I wish them luck, but my prediction has long been that it won’t get better in time, but worse. Considerably worse.

      Microsoft is still in the “trying to convince people to get on board” phase of Windows 10. With Windows 7 now out of support and Windows 8.1 never having much market penetration in the first place, and with Windows 10 now occupying the lion’s share of the Windows market, that phase is almost finished, and when it is, there is nothing stopping MS from imposing whatever it wants on any Windows user’s PC. The times that MS went too far, drew a little more backlash than they’d bargained for, pulled an “aw, shucks,” and backed off on a given trial balloon are fairly numerous by now, but going forward, my bet is that they won’t be backing off.

      It was the recognition of that eventuality that led me to start the migration away from Windows back in the final quarter of 2015. By then it was obvious that MS was not going to be listening to customers and fixing what was wrong with Windows. People asked for an OFF for telemetry, but they got excuses about how they had misunderstood what it was about and why they should not be bothered by it. They asked for a return to the control they had over updates with every version of Windows prior to 10, but all they got was a few more knobs to twiddle, but very little additional control. Each Windows license was actually a draft notice… your PC was going to be part of the “one billion” strong Microsoft army, and this was, as is the norm with conscription, not open for debate.

      So, no happy birthday wish from me. For all of the talk about how much Windows 10 has improved, it looks to me like the same bad deal as it did five years ago, and in some ways (like the growing importance of the MS account), it’s getting worse.  I’m not willing to share my PC with Microsoft, and certainly not on software that I have to pay for AND beta test.  If an OS is not made to serve my interests, as defined by myself, to the exclusion of all others, it’s not fit for purpose.

      As the old aphorism goes, I didn’t leave Windows… Windows left me. The Windows I signed on for and used for 25 years was, generally, fit for purpose by the above definition.  While there were a few areas where MS clearly prioritized its own interests above that of the hardware owner prior to 10, it was trivial stuff compared to what was to come.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      6 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: KDE Slimbook #2283891
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      Full-HD (1920 x 1080) IPS non-glare | 100% sRGB

      That’s all important stuff on that line. I’ve been insisting on IPS displays  (OLED would work too), but until recently, i had neglected the importance of the color gamut (100% sRGB). I knew my Dell G3 came with a narrow gamut IPS display when I bought it, and I came to regret that. The thing cannot display red… its attempts at red all look orange.  It’s bothered me since I noticed it, and when I discovered a cat-related scratch in the G3’s screen the other day, I used that as an excuse to upgrade from the stock 73% sRGB to a 95% sRGB panel. Both are the same series in the LGP lineup, and had the same cost, but one has the wider gamut. The Panelook site lists them as compatible, so it should be a simple upgrade once the panel arrives.

      Since then, I noticed that there is another panel not listed by Panelook as compatible, but that reportedly that should fit and work in the G3, and that also has a 120 hz refresh rate, but I don’t think that is a big concern. My G3 only has a 1050ti, so it is probably not going to be holding 120 fps gaming, and if so, it would probably mean that I could turn up the graphics settings a bit and get a visual boost, which I think I would appreciate more.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Microsoft Pushing Users to 365 #2283772
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      Another example of Microsoft’s intrusion into our systems and another reason why we are making the transition to Apple products.

      I share your disdain for what Windows has become (it’s why I made the transition to Linux a few years ago), but is there not also a Mac version of Outlook?  Does the Mac version not have the ads?

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      in reply to: Google Chrome’s market share has exceeded 70% #2283749
      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      The market share estimates are based on the useragent strings reported to the analytics scripts (presumably) running on the sites that are affiliated with NetMarketShare or the other stat gatherers, and adjusted to account for various sampling errors and the activities of bots.

      It’s difficult to know whether the absolute percentages are accurate or not, as there are a lot of complicating factors. If no persistent ID is assigned to each user who runs the script, it is difficult or impossible to distinguish multiple visits from the same person from unique visitors. Obviously, the visitors to the site don’t necessarily want a persistent ID, as that’s the thing that enables tracking, so any cookies that may be set in order to detect multiple visits may well be removed.  Certain visitors will also have script or adblockers that may well prevent the analytics scripts from running (though there are other ways of collecting the data that are not subject to that limitation, and I don’t know the specifics of what they do).

      The kinds of sites that each analytics company uses can also reach differing audiences, and the trends in any one audience may not translate to others.

      As such, the most useful bit of the market share stats is the trends, not the absolute numbers. There’s no question that the Chrome share has been growing.  Mozilla gave up on competing with Chrome years ago, so many users see no reason to even bother with the likes of Firefox.  It’s too bad the plucky Mozilla that dared to challenge the giant around the turn of the millennium is long gone, replaced with a company that’s as dedicated to following Google’s vision for a browser and the web as the Chrome devs are.That’s unfortunate, not just because one company with a history of hostility to privacy calls the shots, but also because Chrome is just… bad, as I see it anyway.

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,154 total)