News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • bbearren

    Forum Replies Created

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 3,617 total)
    • Author
      Posts
    • in reply to: Credit Where It is Due #1952106

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      This has been explained elsewhere on AskWoody, but I think it bears repeating here in this context.  To avoid quoting an entire post when your intention is to respond to a specific statement, first use your left mouse button to scroll over and highlight the text you wish to quote, then click the Quote button.

      The highlighted text and the properly annotated quoted statement appear in the Reply To text box, ready for you to add your comment(s), as appears below.

      The use of other peoples’ work needs to be credited to the original author, even here at AskWoody. Not only is it the polite thing to do, it allows others to read the source discussion that went before the quote itself.

      This credits the author and references the original post at the same time.  This both calls attention to the statement to which you wish to reply, and saves space in your reply.

      Just my 2¢.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: After updates paused unable to resume updates #1951669

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Yes, run them again, except this time use

      dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth /source:c:\esd-wim\install.wim:1

      for the dism command.  The /limitaccess switch keeps dism from going online to get files from Windows Update.  If some file(s) are missing from your .NET Framework, or possibly corrupt, dism can go online to get whatever is necessary.  It may take a little longer for the process to complete.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: After updates paused unable to resume updates #1951218

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      A couple of things.  First, go to Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Programs and Features and click on Turn Windows features on or off.  Make sure there is a check in the box for .NET Framework 3.5 (includes .NET 2.0 and 3.0).

      Let us know the results.  I’ll stay with you on this.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: After updates paused unable to resume updates #1950852

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Error: 0x800f081f

      That’s a dot NET error.  I would still go with creating fresh installation media, and going through the procedure again.  It kinda all ties together.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: After updates paused unable to resume updates #1950849

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Thanks so much for the detailed very clear instructions to follow. All went fine until the final DISM command. After it finished, apparently unsuccessfully, the same DISM error as I reported in my previous post was displayed.

      I’m guessing that you used the same MCT USB/DVD that you used when you did the in-place upgrade.

      I suggest you create a fresh copy from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 and follow that same procedure again.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: After updates paused unable to resume updates #1950579

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Yes, that is not unfamiliar, and there are procedures to get your PC out of that hole. First, you need to be logged in as a member of the Administrators group. The procedure requires a Media Creation Tool USB drive or DVD. If you already have one, that saves some steps. If not go to https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 and click the Download tool now button. Follow those instructions to get the installation media on a USB thumb drive or burned to a DVD.

      Stay with me on these instructions. There are a few ways to do this, and someone may chime in with a different stroke, but just stay with me and follow these instructions. You’ll need to create a folder on the root of C: drive. In Explorer, click on C: in the left pane, then click New folder. Name the new folder ESD-WIM. Insert your DVD or plug in your USB thumb drive. Open explorer and navigate to the Sources folder on your installation media. Find install.esd, and copy that file to the new ESD-WIM folder. Once that copying is complete, you’re ready for the good stuff.

      Open an elevated Command Prompt, and navigate to the new ESD-WIM folder. In other words, the prompt in the command window needs to be C:\ESD-WIM> This way you don’t need to enter any path statements; less room for typo’s or errors. Now type

      dism /get-wiminfo /wimfile:install.esd

      and hit Enter. The result will give a listing of the different Windows 10 versions that are available in that install.esd compressed file. You need to make note of the index number of the version that matches your installation. For the sake of demonstration, I’m gong to use index:6, but be sure to use the actual index that matches your installation. With that information in mind (and remember, I’m just using 6 for the sake of demonstration) type

      dism /export-image /sourceimagefile:install.esd /sourceindex:6 /destinationimagefile:install.wim /compress:max /checkintegrity

      and hit Enter. This will take a little while. When it completes, you will have an install.wim file in the ESD-WIM folder, but the index will now be index:1, since there is only one extracted install.wim. Now type

      dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth /source:c:\esd-wim\install.wim:1 /limitaccess

      After that finishes, if the results in the command window say that the operation completed successfully, run

      sfc /scannow

      and let us know what messages that gives you. If you get an error message on the dism command, let us know that one, too.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: After updates paused unable to resume updates #1950130

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Do you mean the log files or messages that appear in command prompt window itself?

      Just the messages that appear in the command window itself.  Don’t worry about verbatim, just the general gist.  If there is an error code, get that, too.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: After updates paused unable to resume updates #1949947

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Even if you’ve already done the in-place upgrade, open an elevated Command Prompt (Run as administrator) and then run

      dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth

      After that completes, still in the elevated Command Prompt, run

      sfc /scannow

      Let us know what messages you get after each command.

       

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: Will Win10 1903 and 1909 co-exist? #1949500

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Nothing official, but something that will definitely work.  In the days of Windows XP, I devised Unleash Windows as a way of improving performance by putting parts of Windows on separate drives, and it worked quite well.

      After the introduction of Windows 7, I began getting email from my site visitors asking me when I was going to splice and dice Windows 7, and put that instruction set on my site.  That resulted in Set 7 Free, another comprehensive tutorial.  That same instruction set will work on Windows 10, but I’ve since devised an equally comprehensive but much less complex method.

      I haven’t yet uploaded the new method on my site, I’m still in the process of writing it up.  However, I’m writing this post from the B side of my dual boot, with is completely trisected, and still works just fine.  This type of installation blocks upgrades, but not updates.

      Windows Update will back out of an upgrade with the warning that the installation is not supported by Microsoft.  Updates, on the other hand, haven’t failed so far.  In fact, at the moment in Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update I’m seeing ”

      2019-09 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903 for x64-based Systems (KB4515384)

      Updates are ready to download (with the Download button prominently displayed)

      I must say that the procedure I use is not for the casual user; it is still quite involved, requires some utilities and a good bit of registry editing, but it works.  Once completed, Windows just works.

      Once your ready for the new upgrade, use the MCT USB and run an in-place update.  It will offer only a clean install, but, it will only mess with the C: drive.  Once that clean install is complete, all that is necessary are the registry edits and a bit of cleanup of the no-longer-necessary folders on the C: drive.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: MS-DEFCON 2: Get Windows automatic update locked down #1947633

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      I was only offered 3. KB4516115 for Flash Player, KB4514359 for dot NET 3.5 and 4.8, and Cumulative Update KB4515384.

      Nothing to report; everything’s runnin’ just fine.  I got some on the B side of m dual-boot as well, but forgot to write those down.  That’s the side where I do my slicing and dicing, so I cause the problems there, not updates.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: Admin rights? #1947318

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      I run routinely as a Standard user.  I do not sign in as a member of the Administrators group unless I’m wanting to do something that gets a popup “You must me logged in as an Administrator to perform this action”.  I have UAC set to default.

      I can say that if the default Administrator is enabled, there are a couple of things that account can do that a member of the Administrators group cannot, and it’s only a couple of things.  I have enabled and used it a time or two, then disabled it when I did what I wanted to do.

      I have recently, however, discovered a utility that allows one to run as TrustedInstaller.  Talk about a way to ruin your cupcakes!  It’s one you do not want to use without a very recent drive image, because there isn’t much that one can’t do as TrustedInstaller.  One can edit the registry without needing to take ownership of any keys.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • in reply to: Can CBS logs be deleted? #1942443

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      To delete CBS.log or DISM.log files, just run Notepad as Administrator, File > Open… navigate to the file and open it, delete the contents, save the file and close it.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

      1 user thanked author for this post.

    • bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      We’re owners of the hardware, though, and that is the part MS seems to forget. Nothing MS puts in the EULA changes that they do not own the hardware upon which Windows runs. An OS that sometimes serves the hardware owner and sometimes flatly refuses to do what the hardware owner wants so it can instead serve Microsoft’s interests isn’t what I would call fit for purpose.

      Group “L” (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.5).

      Microsoft is well aware that they are not the owners of hardware in the private sector.  They spell it out distinctly in the EULA early on.

      “By accepting this agreement or using the software, you agree to all of these terms, and consent to the transmission of certain information during activation and during your use of the software as per the privacy statement described in Section 3. If you do not accept and comply with these terms, you may not use the software or its features. You may contact the device manufacturer or installer, or your retailer if you purchased the software directly, to determine its return policy and return the software or device for a refund or credit under that policy. You must comply with that policy, which might require you to return the software with the entire device on which the software is installed for a refund or credit, if any.”

      That is to say, it’s your hardware, Microsoft’s software.  Use Microsoft’s software under their terms on your hardware or don’t use it at all.  Microsoft retains full ownership; always have, and apparently, always will.  Whether or not to enter into their license agreement is entirely up to you.  The terms of the agreement are entirely up to Microsoft.

      You chose to run Linux, instead.  Wise choice for you.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware


    • bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      What’s the point of dual-booting Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Pro? (Just curious.)

      I plunder within the innards of Windows quite a lot, and quite often break it.  The plundering is for purpose, so I don’t just restore a drive image, I keep digging and try to get it straightened out.

      I have found no greater tool for working on a pooched installation of Windows than a clean, fully-updated working installation of Windows that has direct access to the pooched version.  It’s all about finding solutions, as well as ways of making Windows more efficient and reliable.

      When I was running XP, I figured out how to completely separate the main system folders; Windows, Program Files, Users and the Page file onto different partitions/logical drives, and two separate HDD’s.  With the OS and Users on two separate HDD’s, XP loaded noticeably faster.  At that time I had the Users and Programs Files partitions on one HDD, and Windows on a different HDD.  The Page file was on a dedicated partition, formatted in FAT32, at the beginning of a HDD separate from Windows.  That was an additional speed boost.

      When I went to Windows 7, I had to modify the techniques considerably, but finally got Windows 7 working my way as well, without breaking Windows Update.  Even SP1 installed without a hiccup.  I did the same with Windows 8, and Windows 8.1.

      Windows 10 has proven to be a different animal.  I had to put my divided Windows back into a single partition before Windows 10 would upgrade over it.  I’ve been able to cut Windows 10 into pieces, but it breaks Windows Update.  That one is still a work in progress.

      My web site has more details.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

      4 users thanked author for this post.

    • bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      So you now agree that all updates can be paused for up to 35 days, but quality updates can only be deferred for up to 30 days? (Because this all started when you disagreed with me saying that.)

      No, I don’t agree, that simply is not my experience, because while I block driver updates, I neither block nor delay any other updates.  Also how does “all updates” not include “quality updates”?

      On the other hand, Microsoft says “Pause updates: We have extended the ability to pause updates for both feature and monthly updates. This extension ability is for all editions of Windows 10, including Home. You can pause both feature and monthly updates for up to 35 days (seven days at a time, up to five times). Once the 35-day pause period is reached, you will need to update your device before pausing again.”

      Updates

      This graphic of Update history from the B side of my laptop shows “Feature update to Windows 10, version 1903” as a “Feature Update”, while KB4506991 and KB4503308 are shown as “Quality Updates”.

      Clearly, going from 1803 to 1809 is a “Feature Update”.  Do “Quality Updates” fall under Microsoft’s category of “monthly updates”?  It would seem so, since “Quality Updates” are not “Feature Updates”, and the Microsoft article does not list “Quality Updates”, only “monthly updates”.

      However, I’m not going to postpone updates for 35 days just to test this premise, because I prefer being a Seeker, and staying fully updated.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

      Attachments:
    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 3,617 total)