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  • Canadian Tech

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 700 total)
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    • in reply to: Freezing Win7 PC #2265472
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      I look after 120 Win7 systems. Over the last year, i brought every one to my desk and did a complete re-install. In most cases, I replaced the C drive as well. Not a single one of those machines has any problem at all. Every one runs like a well oiled machine.

      One of the biggest source of problems is badly designed/executed Windows Updates. if you will precisely follow the re-install plan outlined here, you will find yourself with a good machine.

      Canadian Tech: How to rebuild a Win7 system with minimal snooping

      CT

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Applications take forever to start #2265024
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      USB sticks make lousy back up devices. They are just not that reliable. Please buy yourself an external hard drive. I mean one with an hard disk. I can go into a lot of detail, but suffice to say the ideal backup device is one of those larger external drives with a 3.5″ drive inside.

      The ones you buy off the shelf are not that good either because you have no idea of how good a drive was installed inside and they are sealed.

      I do this for my clients all the time. Likely have made 50 or more of them. They last forever, I mean decades. Buy an external drive enclosure that houses a 3.5″ drive. Also buy a 3.5″ internal hard drive (the kind that goes into a desktop PC. It is simple to assemble.

      Buy a top end housing and a top-end drive.

      I use this enclosure. $28.75 Cdn Vantec
      And I use only Western Digital Black drives of 1TB or more. WD blacks carry a 5 year warranty, the longest in the industry.

      I do not recommend USB sticks or SSD for backup. Solid State memory physics are that each write to a cell literally wears that cell. Eventually the cell will wear out. Backup are almost 100% writing. Unlike SSD for the OS in your laptop. OS in the SSD are not written often probably 90% read which has no effect on SSD cells.

      Backup devices are like fire extinguishers. You never want to have to use them, but when you do, you really want to be able to be certain it will work.

      CT

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Some anti-virus suggestions for Win 7? #2264482
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      i believe you are very correct about the potential longevity of Win7. Last i checked there were well over 300 million (about 30% of all computers) Win7 users still using the web. That’s a substantial market. Any company that decides to walk away from that market is idealistic and not realistic. There is lots of money to be made continuing to support win7. I have prepared all my 120 clients for a long term use. Personally, i expect i will be using Win7 for years and years to come.

      CT

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Some anti-virus suggestions for Win 7? #2264399
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      If you will take a careful look at this report, you should understand the different qualities of the alternatives https://www.av-comparatives.org/comparison/ When reading these comparisons, you have to keep in mind that a program that provides 95% protection is about 5 times more likely to allow an infection when compared to another product which provides 99%.

      CT

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Some anti-virus suggestions for Win 7? #2264362
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      If you will read my post again:
      Never have more than one AV in place. It will create all sorts of conflicts
      After years and years of working with many different AV’s, two of the last ones I would use are McAfee and Norton. They just do not provide the level of protection that other much better ones do. On top of that, they take a toll on resources and provide lots of false postitives.

      CT

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Some anti-virus suggestions for Win 7? #2263105
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      John, I agree. I have seen Norton in hundreds of PCs. It is a serious resource hog. That is one of the things that I like about BD AV+, very little use of resources. Completely automatic. You never hear from it. It does everything under the covers during times you are not using it.

      CT

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Some anti-virus suggestions for Win 7? #2263104
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      I used malwarebytes for years. Then a Dell technician pointed out a new guy on the block (long time ago). AdWcleaner. It is just as effective, much faster, and is not an installable app. It is a scanner. In my clients’ PCs, the only security/protection product running is BD. I do not allow anything else. When I remotely login, I routinely run ADWcleaner. It often finds nothing because BD does not allow most malware.

      I do not think you need to install norton to run the removal tool. I do agree that it is best to run it more than once. Also you may find Norton folders left behind even after you run the removal tool.

      CT

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Some anti-virus suggestions for Win 7? #2263061
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      Another bit of advice:
      1. Do not ever install more than one AV product.
      2. 99% of the other products that claim to make your PC safer do not. Many are in themselves malware.
      3. 99% of the products that claim to “clean up” your PC can easily make your PC a mess if you are not quite expert.

      CT

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Some anti-virus suggestions for Win 7? #2263050
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      I look after about 120 win7 systems. Have for many years. My clients use only the AV that I install. After almost 5 years, not one of them has seen a single infection of any kine. My clients are not commercial installations. The ONLY AV I will install is Bit Defender Antivirus +. Note well that I do not allow any “security” software. AV is all you need the rest of the stuff in the Security packages are attempts to do better than native windows functions and they do not do a good job of it, in spite of all their claims. The AV-only product is also cheaper.

      I discovered that when I have to diagnose a problem the non-AV stuff actively works against me. Consequently, the only way I will begin diagnosis on a PC that has a security package is by first removing it.

      There is a free version available, but it comes with all the other stuff you do not want or need and lots of commercials. The AV in all version of BD are the same.

      Your source for valid believable test data is the non profit https://www.av-comparatives.org/comparison/

      I should also tell you that for many years preceeding BD, I used Norton AV exclusively. Based on my experience, BD is a clear winner by far.

      CT

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Which External hard drive? #2258975
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      One of my clients has had an external hard drive failure. The drive needs to be initialized. This particular drive was purchased at a store about a year ago. It is a WD Mybook. The case cannot be opened unless you are willing to destroy the case. I did just that.

      Inside I found a Seagate drive manufactured in 2008. Using recovery software, I found over 200,000 files (none of the backups). The files that were recovered were the same files that you would find in a typical Windows installation.

      Clearly, a older/used drive was installed at the factory.

      I have always been suspicious of those pre-assembled external drives. Simply, because you have no way of knowing what is inside. This is a case that proved my concerns.

      I strongly recommend you “build” your own. It is extremely simple. Buy a top-end external drive housing — available for as little as $30USD. Buy a top-end 3.5″ internal drive and assemble them. Cost is only slightly higher. Assembly is very simple.

      CT

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Best way to set up partitions? #2258934
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      The reasons for separate logical partitions pre-dates Windows 7 design. windows 7 no longer has a practical limitation on partition size
      By design, Win7 stores most all data in the User account
      Antivirus software works just as well with small, big or mixed use partionts.

      When you start the installer, when it asks where to install the OS, click advanced. Delete all partitions. Let the installer create the partitions it needs.

      One big C:, is the best configuration.

      CT

      in reply to: Best way to set up partitions? #2258933
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      System restore has no affect on data in Windows 7

      CT

      in reply to: Applications take forever to start #2258376
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      I would be willing to bet, you have faithfully been allowing Microsoft to “update” Windows 7.  That’s the cause.  I have 120 win7 client systems that run day in day out like clocks.  Better than when they are new.  The reason:

      About a year ago, I started bringing them to my desk one at a time.  I did a complete re-install of Windows 7 following the procedure you will find here: https://www.askwoody.com/2019/canadian-tech-how-to-rebuild-a-win7-system-with-minimal-snooping/

      Before I started I decided whether to replace the hard drive.  If a laptop, 4 or 5 years old or more, replace.  If a desktop 7 or 8 years.  Considering their age on average, most got replaced.

      I can virtually guarantee that if you will follow my procedure precisely as written, you will have a system you will delighted with, as my clients have.

      Feel free to ask questions

      CT

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Keizer: Windows 7 usage isn’t going anywhere #2223553
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      One factor to keep in mind: Desktop computer life expectancy is about double that of laptops.

      CT

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Keizer: Windows 7 usage isn’t going anywhere #2223287
      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody_MVP

      I look after about 120 Win7 client machines. The current crisis has caused a surge in my support work as my clients are using their systems far more.

      I read a few months ago that something like 75% of medical scene computers using Win7 will not be replaced by Win10 systems. Medical use computers tend to be integrated with other systems. The cost of a switch over like that is many times the cost of the PC itself. AND, those systems are mostly behind walls that protect them. Win7 is actually a much better system for most of those settings.

      I am not the least bit interested in Windows Update. Not a one of my client systems has had a WU in 34 months now and they run far better than any systems I have ever seen. Not a single instance of any kind of problem in 34 months on 120 systems.

      CT

      10 users thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 700 total)