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  • Carl D

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 163 total)
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    • in reply to: Disappearing Printers #2266034
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hi, printers are locally installed.

      Here’s a screenshot of my printers:

      printers1

      Now, this is what happens when I turn on the two printers:

      printers2

      And, when I turn the two printers off:

      printers3

      It will stay like that for maybe a week if I don’t turn on either printer and then they just “disappear” and I end up with screenshot 1 again until I turn the printers on.

      But, I can live with it. All I need to do is turn the printers on and they “reappear”.

      Does seem a little odd though because, as I mentioned earlier, this never happened with Windows 7 or earlier Windows versions.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

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      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Disappearing Printers #2265913
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thanks, Paul.

      It is rather unusual though, I’ve always left my printers turned off and only turn them on when I need to print something. Never had this issue in Windows 7 or earlier versions of Windows.

      Not really a huge problem. As I said, I just turn the printers on and they “reappear”. And, I have to change the default back to one of my two printers, of course.

      I usually notice it when I go to print something after not using the printers for some time and nothing happens because the default printer has changed to Microsoft Print to PDF. If I’m really paying attention before that I’ll notice that my two printers are missing from the list of available printers when I’m asked which one I want to use.

      @anonymous, I’ll check back and read your reply later. Can’t see it at the moment because its awaiting moderation.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      I downloaded the latest evaluation version of 2004 the other day from UUP Dump and installed it on a spare solid state drive.

      Took about 10 minutes before I shut it down and reconnected 1909. Can’t really see any difference between 1909 and 2004 except a few changed icons on the Start Menu and a couple of extra “features” which I’m sure I would have been uninstalling very quickly.

      I didn’t have the PC connected to the Internet (as usual) during the install so I didn’t get to see what extra ‘bloatware’ came with 2004.

      Oh, and I remembered to turn off Fast Startup in the Power Settings of 2004 and rebooted before shutting it down and disconnecting and reconnecting my 1909 SSD otherwise Windows wants to run chkdsk on the 1909 drive. Been caught out with that one before, I have no idea why MS keep making Fast Startup the default on every Windows 10 install, it causes more problems than it “solves” in my opinion – especially on dual boot systems.

      Oh, and I use StopUpdates10 to block all Windows 10 updates until I’m ready to install them.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      in reply to: Cheap Windows 10 product keys — Are they legit? #2265766
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Not sure about Windows 8/8.1 or Windows 10 but I do know that OEM keys for Windows 7 (and presumably earlier) would activate and stay activated on a completely different PC if more than 120 days have passed since the key was last activated.

      In other words, the activation data on Microsoft’s servers would be deleted after 120 days.

      Not actually legal but Microsoft didn’t seem to be too concerned about it.

      I’m referring to OEM versions that you bought from a computer shop, etc. when you built your own PC or bought hardware like a new motherboard, etc. (some shops would even sell you an OEM copy of Windows if you just bought a new mouse or keyboard and I know of one shop here that used to sell you an OEM copy without buying any hardware at all). But, I believe this “practice” was stopped some time back.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      And, once again I can’t help but wonder just how many of these “scary” zero days would ever have seen the light of day if these (presumably) highly paid “security researchers” hadn’t found them?

      I cannot imagine any (or at least most) of these ever being discovered by the “hacker wannabes” hiding away in the darkness of their parents’ basements furiously typing away day in and day out trying to create the next “big scary security issue” (and impress their peers, of course).

      As I’ve said before, PC “security” is big business these days with the seemingly never ending “security issues”. And, as I’ve also said before, Microsoft love it because it enables them to keep a ‘leash’ on customers’ computers.

      (The best “security tool” is still common sense, in my opinion).

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      in reply to: Freeware Spotlight — KillEmAll #2175289
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      KillEmAll (original)

      Quote from above link:

      The reason you don’t simply close or “X out” the popup is because malicious code can be run even if you click the X button — it is after all just another button, you might as well be clicking OK or Yes, please do what you want with my PC…

      Yes, I’m sure a lot of Windows 7 users learned all about that during the GWX campaign.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      It seems to me that Microsoft are going to have to spend a lot of time (and devote quite a few staff who could probably be doing something else – like making sure Windows 10 updates are less problematic) over the next 3 years of Windows 7 extended support not just writing the security updates but also playing the ‘cat and mouse’ game with people who are obviously determined to get the extended security patches for free.

      I’m sure someone from MS said a few years back that one of the reasons (if not the main reason) they wanted everyone on Windows 10 was so they could concentrate on the one operating system.

      Since they are going to be spending just as much time supporting Windows 7 (probably even more now with the abovementioned ‘cat and mouse’ game) they should have just kept ‘extended’ Windows 7 support available for everyone for the next 3 years and even beyond.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      It seems like every time there is an unusual attack method there is a lot of noise saying ‘update now or die a horrible death’. But the fearmongers are ignoring how likely one is to be vulnerable to the attack in the real world not in some carefully crafted lab exercise. It is truly rare that one must patch immediately upon release updates. In those truly rare cases were one might be vulnerable, a little bit of caution is often adequate for the near term until the patch stability is ascertained.

      Exactly.

      Weren’t we all supposed to die a “horrible death” if we didn’t patch 2 years ago when there was a lot of noise (mostly static, it seems) about Meltdown and Spectre?

      Still waiting for reports of these being exploited in the wild. Same for the majority of these “security issues” being reported and patched every month.

      As I’ve said before – security has become a multi million dollar business these days. Security researchers are seemingly falling over themselves trying to find every little security issue in Windows (and other software, of course) so they can be the first to announce “Oooh… look what we’ve found, aren’t we clever?” And, most importantly, they get paid big dollars for finding all these “flaws”.

      MS apparently also want this situation to continue indefinitely because, as I’ve said in the past, it enables them to keep a ‘leash’ on peoples’ computers with the never ending updates.

      I always think of Canadian Tech with his 130 Windows 7 client computers which haven’t had a single Windows Update installed since May 2017 (and haven’t had any security issues) every time a new “OMG!! You’re in danger… must patch now!!” security issue appears (I’m expecting an escalation in these now that Windows 7 isn’t getting any more security updates to try and get more people onto Windows 10).

      But, having said all that I’ve checked Firefox, Edge and Internet Explorer on my Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit with the January updates installed and I’m not vulnerable (I always have Macrium Reflect to save me from any Windows Update issues every month).

      P.S. where is the cute little logo for this vulnerability? Haven’t seen one yet. I’m most disappointed especially after the nice ones we had for Meltdown, Spectre and BlueKeep.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: What OS are you using? #2018888
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Great idea.

      Just added my PC specs as my signature.

      (this post is actually a test to make sure it worked).

       

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: December 2019 Patch Tuesday running commentary #2017735
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Yes, MS seem to be great at coding things like “W7 end of support” and “W7 and 8.1 unsupported hardware” nag screens and the entire former (has it really ended?) GWX campaign.

      Perhaps they should concentrate a bit more on coding security and bug fixes instead.

      A little less ‘Ninja Cats’ and ‘Taco Hats’ and instead, getting on with the job of providing a secure and stable operating system for all of their paying customers.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by Carl D.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Firefox 71.0 – Is it safe or not? #2017095
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      I updated to 71.0 a few days back (I did say in a previous post somewhere that I was going to wait a while but I always have Macrium images to save me if something goes wrong).

      Working well with no problems so far. Windows 10 1909 64bit. Can’t imagine there is anything seriously wrong with 71 or surely they would have pulled or updated it by now?

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Interesting. I knew someone would find a way to enable this.

      Let’s see what happens after January.

      My Digital Life – I gave up trying to read threads on that forum a long time ago. All I ever saw was “You need to login to view this posts content” every second or third post. And, no… I don’t want to register.

      I suspect that’s the ‘default’ setting for posting there, i.e. the members needs to turn it off every post for non members to be able to see their messages. I assumed this because a lot of the posts (especially from ‘newbies’) are not really the sort of posts that the Admins/Mods there should think needed to be hidden from non members.

      Oh, and in case anyone’s wondering how I’ve seen a lot of the ‘hidden’ posts – if someone quotes a ‘hidden’ post, non members can see the original post in the quote regardless of whether the quoted post was hidden or not.

       

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by Carl D.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thanks for the heads up on this.

      I’ve just checked for updates in Firefox and I’m getting the “offer” to update to 71.0. I think I’ll leave it for a while.

      “As the saying goes, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

      Mozilla are planning to move to a 4 week release cycle for Firefox by March next year, looks like they’re trying to outdo Chrome with their current 6 week cycle.

      If they weren’t constantly adding mostly useless features that most people probably don’t need or want and wouldn’t use then I imagine quite a few staff wouldn’t have a job.

      As seems to be the case with a lot of software companies (I’m looking at you, MS) these days.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      in reply to: Avast snooping gets called out by Firefox #2014322
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Have CCleaner/Avast been at it again with the Black Friday ‘flyout’ ads this year?

      I would have thought that after all the flak they copped about this last year they wouldn’t have tried it again. Goes to prove they really don’t care about annoying people. Just like a lot of companies these days.

      Anyway, what I do with CCleaner (like I do with Windows and a lot of programs and drivers, etc. these days) is install/update it with the computer disconnected from the Internet.

      After the install or update, I disable and delete the 2 scheduled tasks CCleaner creates.

      I then go to Program Files > CCleaner and delete the CCleanerUpdate executable and use a little program called OneClickFirewall to disable Internet access for the CCleaner and CCleaner64 executables (with OneClickFirewall you just right click on the executables and select “Block Internet Access”).

      This, of course, stops CCleaner accessing the Internet. No flyout/popup ads or other shenanigans.

      (Before I found out about OneClickFirewall I tried blocking CCleaner’s Internet access with Windows Firewall but it didn’t seem to work for some reason? This was during last year’s “premiere” of the Black Friday ads. Don’t know if I had Windows Firewall configured incorrectly or it was something more ‘sinister’ going on where Windows Firewall ignores certain firewall rules, I’ll just leave it at that but I’m sure everyone knows what I’m hinting at).

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

      • This reply was modified 5 months, 4 weeks ago by Carl D.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Macrium Black Friday sale 2019: 50% off #2012108
      Carl D
      AskWoody Lounger

      Not sure if I’m on the right track here but the free version of Macrium Reflect has always been able to do full restores, even to a different hard drive or SSD. Unless something’s changed with the free version lately (I’m now using paid)?

      I have full images of the SSD that Windows 10 is installed on (which is split into several partitions). The images are on a separate SSD. If my main SSD which I’m using right now fails, I can swap it out with another SSD and restore the Reflect image onto it by putting the SSD with the images into a USB3 external dock and booting with the recovery thumb drive I created.

      The main difference that I’ve seen so far between the free and paid versions is the paid version will do Rapid Delta Restores which makes restoring images very quick because it compares the image you’re restoring with your current Windows installation and only restores the parts that have changed since the image was created.

      Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 1909 64bit.

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 163 total)