• Carl D

    Carl D

    @carl-d

    Viewing 15 replies - 196 through 210 (of 240 total)
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    • @Ascaris

      If you don’t want Windows 10 to install Candy Crush and all of the other ‘bloat’ just make sure your PC or laptop is not connected to the Internet when installing Windows 10. This even works with the Home Edition which I have on my laptop and I’ve just installed on the main PC.

      I also turn off and remove all the live tiles from the Start menu and go through and change all of my privacy settings, etc. before allowing W10 to connect to the Internet. No sign of Candy Crush and all of the other ‘bloat’ even after using Windows Update.

      If you have more than one account in Windows, make sure you’re disconnected from the Internet before signing into the other account(s) for the first time or those accounts will get Candy Crush, etc. even if the main Administrator account didn’t.

      Edit: You still get things installed like Feedback Hub, XBox, Groove Music, Mobile Plans, etc. but these are easily removed (I use CCleaner).

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • Well, the “free” upgrade definitely still works for me here in Australia.

      Did one less than 6 hours ago. Used an ‘old’ Windows 7 Home Premium license key which was accepted and gave me a “new” Windows 10 Home license for the main PC.

      Reason for doing this is I want to have a dual boot of Windows 7 Professional and Windows 10 on this PC. I already have a Windows 10 Professional upgrade license for the W7 Professional but you can’t (or at least you’re not supposed to) use Windows 7 and the Windows 10 license upgrade for it as a dual boot on the same PC.

      Not really worried about using Windows 10 Home as opposed to Pro in this dual boot seeing as there doesn’t seem to be a great deal of difference between them any more – the option to defer updates in Pro is good as long as MS don’t decide to override it. And, I have Windows Update Blocker to (hopefully) stop updates in Home – it works for the W10 Home I have on my old laptop so far.

      Edit: If anyone’s wondering why I don’t just install the Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 10 Professional as a dual boot it is because I have 32GB of RAM in this PC and Windows 7 Home Premium can only use half of the RAM.

       

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • in reply to: Gralla: How to handle Win10 updates #205054

      I wonder if this Windows Update Blocker works with Windows 10 Home Edition? If it only turns the Windows Update service off then it won’t be any good because (as I found out recently) Microsoft will just turn the service back on again without your permission and download and install updates.

      I even had it disabled with O&O’s ShutUp10 and had everything I could find also disabled in Task Scheduler – including a couple of tasks under Windows Update  (something about “healing” and turning the Update service back on when needed) but that didn’t make any difference. Updates still downloaded and installed.

      If this tool does actually work with W10 Home then I might consider installing W10 again on my 12 year old laptop because it did run rather well (even if a little slow) up until Microsoft force installed updates last week and caused the laptop to blue screen.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • David,

      That’s an interesting question. I have seen several shop windows recently with TV’s/monitors displaying advertising where I’ve seen a blue Windows box in the image which says something like:

      “Windows needs your help. Windows Update has been unable to check for updates for the past 30 days” (or words to that effect) and there are 2 choices – go to Windows Update or Close.

      I’m assuming these shop computers are running Windows 10 and they’re not connected to the Internet. I’m also assuming that if you close the message box it will keep coming back again and again.

      Now, I don’t know if there is a way to disable these notifications but if any”workarounds” are as effective as the methods of disabling Windows Update for W10 (especially in the Home Edition) then I don’t believe there is much chance of stopping them. Unless you go online and let Windows Update run, of course.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: Windows 10 Version 1803 #204559

      Well, my new found enthusiasm for Windows 10 didn’t last long. After running flawlessly for nearly a week (although it did run a little slow which is what one would expect for such an old laptop) I went to shutdown the laptop 2 nights ago and what do I see?

      “Installing updates – do not turn off your computer”

      Hmm… I had Windows Updates disabled in Services as well as with O&O’s ShutUp10 so you can imagine my surprise when this happened. I was even more surprised after I restarted the laptop when it finished installing the updates – less than a minute after restarting I get a blue screen error. Fantastic. I managed to get a quick look in Services before the blue screen and I noticed that the Windows Update service had switched itself to Manual from Disabled.

      I realize this was Windows 10 Home Edition which usually has no control over updates but as far as I’m concerned this sort of behaviour in an operating system is unacceptable. Just downloading and installing updates with no notification except for when the deed is done. And then find the updates have messed up your computer (yep, I know – I’m preaching to the choir here).

      I then tried restoring a Macrium Reflect image, I had made 3 of them over the past week. For some reason all 3 of them were corrupt and would not work. That was the end of it for me. Thank goodness I hadn’t wiped my Linux Mint solid state drive, it has gone back into the laptop and it will probably stay there for good this time. I would have liked to put Windows 7 back on the laptop but since the processor doesn’t support SSE2 I can’t install any updates since the beginning of the year without getting blue screen errors because Microsoft can’t/won’t fix it.

      I’ve also gone back to Windows 7 on the main PC. I had Windows 10 Professional on there with (supposedly) has a bit more control over updates but who knows what will happen next with MS and Windows 10? At least it hadn’t ‘auto updated’ when I last used it like the laptop did but I don’t have time to keep checking each day (or several times a day) to see if my Windows Update settings have ‘magically’ changed.

      Might see what happens with the next release of Windows 10 in a few months time but I won’t be holding my breath hoping for some change in the forced updates for Home Edition.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: AskWoody turns 14 years old #203641

      Congratulations, Woody.

      Your site started just over 3 years after I first went online – about March 2001.

      Keep up the good work.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • I’ve been seeing on different forums that Microsoft is trying to force pc’s to upgrade to Win 10 again..

      I’m guessing after a few million more Windows 7 machines are “accidentally upgraded” to Windows 10 we’ll be seeing the all too familiar “Oops, sorry – we made (another) mistake, that wasn’t supposed to happen” line from MS.

      Gets a bit tiresome after a few years. And, why they’ve been allowed to get away with this sort of behaviour for the past 3 years continues to escape me.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • What I really don’t understand is the 61% Chrome usage…. I use FF 90% of the time.

      That’s really quite simple. Chrome has been ‘bundled’ with just about every bit of freeware (and more) that people have downloaded for the past several years.

      And, since most people just ‘click through’ without reading when installing their nice new bit of freeware they suddenly find this extra icon on their desktop/taskbar for Google Chrome and wonder “where did that come from?” (it is always ticked to install by default).

      I’ve even had one or two friends who didn’t even realize Chrome had been installed (despite the presence of the abovementioned icon).

      All of these probably count in the statistics even if these people never even use Chrome after it is installed.

      Even my Gigabyte motherboard driver discs over the past 3 years have had Chrome on them (recommended by Gigabyte and ticked to install by default, of course).

      I’m sure Firefox (or any other browser) would be the #1 browser today had they been able to use the same ‘tactics’ as Google has with Chrome.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Pentium III users knocked out of Win7 patches #198860

      My HP laptop is a 5203TU which originally came with Windows XP Professional, 512MB RAM and a 60GB ‘spinner’ hard drive.

      Over the years I’ve upgraded it to the maximum 2GB RAM and a solid state drive with Windows 7 Home Premium. Surprised it is still working after all these years but I do look after my computers. The other thing I’ve always liked about this laptop is that things like the hard drive, wireless card, RAM and even the button battery for keeping the BIOS settings are easy to get to. Unlike most new laptops these days.

      Well, I’ve put the Linux Mint 18.3 SSD back in (I’m typing this reply from the laptop with Mint right now) and I’ve wiped the Windows 7 SSD and put it away as a spare.

      At least Mint 18.3 is supported until 2021 which is one year more than Windows 7 was supposed to be. Might try 19 on another SSD when it is released shortly.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: Pentium III users knocked out of Win7 patches #198826

      Great post, Ascaris.

      In regards to Windows Update being blocked on newer processors, I’ve been running Windows 7 on Kaby Lake for nearly a year now – fully up to date with Windows Updates (there’s at least 2 ways of getting around MS’s block). No problems with drivers for Windows 7 either, they came on the motherboard disc (they’ve since been updated on the Gigabyte website). Runs perfectly with no problems whatsoever.

      And, while we’re on the subject of MS’s shenanigans, let’s not forget the “eternal wait for Windows 7 updates” saga which, strangely enough, started happening just after the release of Windows 10. I still believe that was another deliberate action by MS to get people off 7 and onto 10 despite claims of “update supersedence” or whatever.

      The thing that finally convinced me that this was deliberate was when Windows 8.1 started having the same issue some time later. I actually installed 8.1 a couple of times 2 years back… the first time I installed it the initial check for updates took a few minutes. Within the space of a few months the initial check for updates started taking hours just like it was for Windows 7.

      I’m sure MS only finally “fixed” the update issue for Windows 7 after countless numbers of people (especially businesses) complained.

       

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • in reply to: Pentium III users knocked out of Win7 patches #198807

      Well, that’s the end of it for me with my 32bit  12 year old HP laptop running Windows 7 on an Intel T2050 @ 1.60Ghz and 2GB RAM.

      This doesn’t support SSE2 and I’ve been holding off patching for the past few months waiting for MS to fix the problem. Well, they’ve just made it easy for me as I said in a previous post a few days back:

      “Out comes the Windows 7 SSD and in goes the Linux Mint one – for good this time”.

      And, I still believe this is a deliberate move by MS in their ongoing crusade to kill off Windows 7 early. I’m waiting with bated breath to see their next move. But, I might be watching it from an all Linux/Android environment hopefully.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: June 2018 Patch Tuesday is upon us #198055

      The support page for KB 4284826 gives a “Known issue” that was introduced in the March Rollup and still has not been fixed by Microsoft. This is due to a lack of support for SIMD/SSE2. If you can turn it on in the BIOS, it may fix the issue you are having.

      MS doesn’t seem to be in too much of a hurry to fix this, do they?

      Second (or third?) month in a row now where I’m not game enough to patch Windows 7 on my 32bit 2006 vintage HP laptop.

      Maybe that’s part of the ongoing plan by MS to kill off Windows 7… get rid of the remaining 32bit versions by making them unpatchable then move on to the 64bit version? Well, I’ll give them one more month to fix this. If they don’t then out comes the Windows 7 SSD and in goes the Linux Mint one – for good this time.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • in reply to: June 2018 Patch Tuesday is upon us #197509

      One cannot help but wonder if there really are more security issues in Windows 10 than 7 and 8.1 or whether MS isn’t bothering to patch all of the security issues in it’s older OS’s as part of their ongoing crusade to get everyone onto Windows 10.

      I’ll take my tinfoil hat off again now (it has almost become a permanent part of my attire lately).

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • in reply to: Microsoft to stop participating in Windows 7 forums #197308

      The seemingly endless parade of bad updates over the past 6 months or so especially since the appearance of the Meltdown/Spectre fiasco (which the cynic in me still can’t help but think is yet another deliberately engineered ‘plot’ to try and kill off Windows 7) also doesn’t appear to be deterring too many people from leaving Windows 7.

      After reading this again what I meant to say was “doesn’t appear to be deterring too many people from using Windows 7”.

      (I had only just got out of bed when I typed that).

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: Microsoft to stop participating in Windows 7 forums #197122

      The cynic in me makes me wonder what MS might have planned for the remaining 18 months of so called support for Windows 7?

      Let’s see… The GWX campaign with all of it’s shenanigans didn’t seem to have the desired effect of moving everyone to Windows 10.

      The seemingly endless parade of bad updates over the past 6 months or so especially since the appearance of the Meltdown/Spectre fiasco (which the cynic in me still can’t help but think is yet another deliberately engineered ‘plot’ to try and kill off Windows 7) also doesn’t appear to be deterring too many people from leaving Windows 7.

      These things did however cause lots of threads to be created by angry W7 users on the support forums.

      Maybe MS is about to make a last ditched attempt to sabotage Windows 7 so they’re ‘battening down the hatches’ so to speak to try and avoid the inevitable backlash which could be worse than what we’ve seen up to date?

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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