• Carl D

    Carl D

    @carl-d

    Viewing 15 replies - 211 through 225 (of 240 total)
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    • All of the Federal and State government entities I’ve had dealings with over the past 6 months here in Australia are now running Windows 10. Probably all ‘upgraded’ from perfectly functional Windows 7 or earlier systems.

      And, I bet they don’t have Candy Crush and it’s ilk on their Windows 10 computers.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • in reply to: Google and Microsoft Reveal New Spectre Attack #194010

      Ask yourself: Who stands to make money by getting everyone hyped up with headlines like…

      people relaxed. That was a mistake.

      and

      If you thought that you are done patching your devices against Meltdown or Spectre exploits, you might want to reconsider.

      It strikes me again and again that “Spectre” and “Meltdown” are first and foremost tools to manipulate the masses, used by those trying to make money in “security”. Woody called it right with his very first response to the Meltdown and Spectre introduction. These are vulnerabilities with an all too well-developed marketing campaign. -Noel

      And, all of this “Spectre” and “Meltdown” business also seems to be giving Microsoft another “weapon” in it’s seemingly never ending quest to kill off Windows 7 and force everyone (or, as many people as it can) onto Windows 10.

      For example, the slowdowns experienced by Windows 7 with the Spectre/Meltdown patches apparently don’t affect Windows 10. How convenient for MS.

      As others have said in the past, the GWX “campaign” never really ended. MS has just changed tactics. Definitely a well orchestrated plan, in my opinion.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • Does this include the infamous Candy Crush Saga?

      During the short time I had Windows 10 1803 on my old laptop a couple of weeks back I tried removing Candy Crush several times (Start Menu > right click  > uninstall) and it just kept coming back again and again.

      I can’t stand those sorts of shenanigans which is one reason why every new version of Windows 10 is always short lived on any of my devices.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • Not sure if this is related but last week I decided to download the 32bit ISO of Windows 10 1803 and try it out again on my 12 year old HP laptop with a Samsung 840EVO SSD.

      When Windows 10 was first available nearly 3 years ago I tried it on this laptop with the same SSD but I was getting blue screen errors on a regular basis plus Windows kept insisting on downloading a Synaptics touchpad driver that didn’t work for this machine.

      I was pleasantly surprised with 1803 at first on this laptop – it had all the drivers installed except for a driver for a card reader that I don’t use anyway (it didn’t download a Synaptics touchpad driver but the touchpad worked fine with the standard Windows mouse driver) and it ran flawlessly for the short time I used it.

      All seemed OK until I used the laptop on battery power, imagine my surprise when the battery ran down to the low power warning in half the time it takes to run down with my Windows 7/Linux Mint dual boot on the other Samsung 840. And, all was doing was surfing the Internet.

      And, the battery was new just a couple of years back.

      Needless to say, I’ve now put the other SSD back in with 7/Mint.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • As I’ve mentioned once or twice before I have a 12 year old HP laptop which originally came with Windows XP then upgraded to a solid state drive and Windows 7 a couple of years ago.

      It has an Intel T2050 at 1.60GHz and I am certain it will never see anything from Intel or Microsoft to protect against Meltdown or Spectre.

      Nowadays, the laptop runs a fully up to date (including kernel) Linux Mint 18.3 and I’ve just run a script that checks for Meltdown and Spectre vulnerability. It is no longer vulnerable to Spectre variants 1 and 2 but still vulnerable to ‘Meltdown’ aka ‘Variant 3’ and it tells me to get the latest kernel available. As I don’t like being on the ‘cutting edge’ when it comes to Linux kernels I think I can wait until to fix becomes available via the normal update process.

      If Linux is able to fix these vulnerabilities for older processors (and without borking your computer) why can’t Microsoft do it – especially with Windows 7?

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • in reply to: Has the “real” Win10 version 1803 just been pushed #186819

      I was rather amused by a recent article on The Register where they referred to the next version of Windows 10 as “Windows 10 Springwatch”.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: Elementary OS #181126

      Might have to give Elementary OS a try sometime (that’s the advantage of having spare solid state drives sitting around here).

      My  nearly 12 year old HP laptop would be a good candidate for this. I did have Linux Lite on it for a while but I was having problems with both Firefox (version 52 ESR) and Pale Moon crashing regularly for some strange reason – Pale Moon would just close without any notification at all. Disabling hardware acceleration in both browsers cut down the amount of crashes but I was still getting a few.

      I was thinking it might just be the age of the laptop – motherboard parts getting old, etc. but the same 2 browsers work perfectly (so far – and again with hardware acceleration disabled) with Linux Mint 18.3 which I’ve had on the laptop for several days now.

      Edit: Oh, I see there isn’t a 32 bit version which I would need for my old laptop 🙁

      I’ll have to get the 64 bit version and give it a spin on my main PC.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: Win10 usage share drifts down in March, Win7 goes up #181104

      “We need to move from people needing Windows to choosing Windows to loving Windows…We want to make Windows 10 the most loved release of Windows.”

      – Satya Nadella

      I was always under the impression that the word love was meant to be reserved for describing feelings between two people – not inanimate objects and certainly not computer software.

      A better choice of word would have been “like”.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: I think we’re back. Are you seeing any problems? #179176

      I get this message occasionally in Pale Moon when I arrive at the site:

      “Secure Connection Failed

      An error occurred during a connection to http://www.askwoody.com.

      The OCSP server has no status for the certificate.

      (Error code: sec_error_ocsp_unknown_cert)

      The page you are trying to view cannot be shown because the authenticity of the received data could not be verified.

      Please contact the website owners to inform them of this problem.”

      Happened about 3 or 4 times in the past few hours. If I try again immediately after seeing the message I usually get straight onto the site with no problem.

       

       

       

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • I think an Anonymous poster on The Register site hits the nail squarely on the head with this comment on the topic “Microsoft’s Windows 7 Meltdown fixes from January, February made PCs MORE INSECURE”:

      “Microsoft ain’t done til Windows 7 won’t run!”

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

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    • Hand raised here too, of course. Linux online, Windows (7) offline.

      If I need Internet access while I’m using Windows 7 I have my trusty HP laptop (running Linux) right next to me. Or I can use my tablet or smartphone.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: So, where’s the 32-bit Windows 7 Meltdown patch? #173395

      As I mentioned in another post, my nearly 12 year old 32 bit HP laptop is now running Linux Lite after using Windows XP and, after that, Windows 7 over the years. Much faster on the older hardware and I don’t need to play the “Oh, its Patch Tuesday, what is MS going to mess up/try to sneak in this month (KB2952664 – I’m looking at you – again)” game anymore.

      Meanwhile, the only question I have about Meltdown/Spectre at the moment is – has it surpassed Y2K yet as the biggest non event in computing history?

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Linux Lite #173172

      Jim,

      I was originally going to install Linux Mint as a dual boot with Windows 7 on the same solid state drive (Samsung 840EVO 250GB). I already had Windows 7 installed and I intended to install Mint on the extra empty space (about 50GB) that I deliberately left at the end of the drive after the Windows partitions (Windows 7, Games, etc.)

      The problem I had was that I still like to use Linux Mint 17.3 at the moment which is supported for another 12 months. But, I’m using a Kaby Lake processor and Mint 17.3 doesn’t recognize Kaby Lake enough to set up an automatic dual boot – i.e. no “Install Mint alongside Windows 7” option. I know I could probably do it manually with the “Something else” option but I couldn’t be bothered figuring it out at the time.

      So, I unplugged the Windows 7 SSD (and my separate Data drive SSD – another Samsung 840EVO) and installed Mint 17.3 on the OCZ 120GB SSD I put into the tower just for Mint.

      After installing Mint 17.3 I reconnected the Windows 7 and Data drives (after shutting down and turning the power off, of course) and then I had  to use the option in the BIOS to boot into the Windows or Linux SSD. I booted into Linux and did all of the updates which also included an update for the GRUB boot loader.

      After finishing the updates and rebooting I now had the option to boot into Windows or Linux via GRUB – as long as the Linux SSD is set as the first boot drive in the BIOS options. If I select the Windows 7 SSD as the first boot drive, the computer boots directly into Windows 7. So I leave the Linux SSD as the first boot drive so I can just use GRUB and not have to go into the BIOS to select which drive to boot from.

      What I like about this setup is that if I unplug either SSD, the PC will automatically boot into the other one which is handy in case one of the SSD’s fails (I have Macrium Reflect images of both Windows and Linux – Linux Mint can be imaged from within Windows) – and I have a couple of spare SSD’s so swapping out a failed SSD and restoring an image should be fairly quick and painless.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Linux Lite #173015

      I’ve recently installed Linux Lite on my nearly 12 year old HP laptop (dv-5203tu) and I must say that so far I am very impressed, much faster than the laptop was with Windows XP and later, Windows 7.

      The laptop originally came with 512MB of RAM and a 60GB spinner hard drive. Over the years I upgraded it to the maximum 2GB RAM and a solid state hard drive. Only use it for email, web browsing and the occasional document (my Epson printer works perfectly with Linux Lite as it does with Linux Mint on my main PC).

      On a related note, I decided it was time for clean installs on my main PC a couple of weeks back. I now have Windows 7 and Linux Mint in a dual boot (on separate solid state drives). Windows 7 has been patched up until last December and it is now no longer allowed to access the Internet (Network Adapter disabled in Control Panel). All online activities are done with Linux Mint. I prefer this approach instead of using virtual machines – never seemed to have much success with those for some reason.

      So happy to be off the Windows Update ‘treadmill’. I have better things to do with my time than playing that game, especially since the start of the Spectre/Meltdown fiasco.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • Not sure if this has anything to do with the problem but I’ll just throw this into the mix.

      Some years back a friend was suddenly having problems with none of his USB devices being recognized by his PC. Rebooting didn’t fix it, neither did shutting down the PC then starting it up again. Even restoring a Ghost image (which he was using at the time) made no difference.

      After a bit of  “Googling” I found that what we had to do was shut down the PC then disconnect it from the wall socket (turning off the switch which is usually on the PC power supply probably would do the same thing) so the motherboard is completely ‘powered down’, leave it off for a couple of minutes then turn the wall switch back on and start up the PC. After that all USB devices worked properly again.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 15 replies - 211 through 225 (of 240 total)